Samuel Aparicio

BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

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Publications (109)1646.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of lapatinib versus trastuzumab combined with taxanes in the first-line setting of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive metastatic breast cancer (BC) is unknown. The MA.31 trial compared a combination of first-line anti-HER2 therapy (lapatinib or trastuzumab) and taxane therapy for 24 weeks, followed by the same anti-HER2 monotherapy until progression. Stratification was by prior (neo)adjuvant anti-HER2 therapy, prior (neo)adjuvant taxane, planned taxane, and liver metastases. The primary end point was intention-to-treat (ITT) progression-free survival (PFS), defined as time from random assignment to progression by RECIST (version 1.0) criteria, or death for patients with locally assessed HER2-positive tumors. The primary test statistic was a stratified log-rank test for noninferiority. PFS was also assessed for patients with centrally confirmed HER2-positive tumors. From July 17, 2008, to December 1, 2011, 652 patients were accrued from 21 countries, resulting in 537 patients with centrally confirmed HER2-positive tumors. Median follow-up was 21.5 months. Median ITT PFS was 9.0 months with lapatinib and 11.3 months with trastuzumab. By ITT analysis, PFS was inferior for lapatinib compared with trastuzumab, with a stratified hazard ratio (HR) of 1.37 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.65; P = .001). In patients with centrally confirmed HER2-positive tumors, median PFS was 9.1 months with lapatinib and 13.6 months with trastuzumab (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.83; P < .001). More grade 3 or 4 diarrhea and rash were observed with lapatinib (P < .001). PFS results were supported by the secondary end point of overall survival, with an ITT HR of 1.28 (95% CI, 0.95 to 1.72; P = .11); in patients with centrally confirmed HER2-positive tumors, the HR was 1.47 (95% CI, 1.03 to 2.09; P = .03). As first-line therapy for HER2-positive metastatic BC, lapatinib combined with taxane was associated with shorter PFS and more toxicity compared with trastuzumab combined with taxane. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
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    ABSTRACT: The bradykinin receptor B1R is overexpressed in many human cancers where it might be used as a general target for cancer imaging. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using radiolabeled kallidin derivatives to visualize B1R expression in a preclinical model of B1R-positive tumors. Three synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro and in vivo for receptor binding and their ability to visualize tumors by positron emission tomography (PET). Enalaprilat and phosphoramidon were used to evaluate the impact of peptidases on tumor visualization. While we found that radiolabeled peptides based on the native kallidin sequence were ineffective at visualizing B1R-positive tumors, peptidase inhibition with phosphoramidon greatly enhanced B1R visualization in vivo. Two stabilized derivatives incorporating unnatural amino acids ((68)Ga-SH01078 and (68)Ga-P03034) maintained receptor-binding affinities that were effective, allowing excellent tumor visualization, minimal accumulation in normal tissues and rapid renal clearance. Tumor uptake was blocked in the presence of excess competitor, confirming that the specificity of tumor accumulation was receptor-mediated. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for non-invasive B1R detection by PET imaging as a general tool to visualize many human cancers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Cancer Research 01/2015; DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-1603 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionThe extracellular signals regulating mammary epithelial cell growth are of relevance to understanding the pathophysiology of mammary epithelia, yet they remain poorly characterized. Here we applied an unbiased approach to understanding the functional role of signaling molecules in several models of normal physiological growth and translated these results to the biological understanding of breast cancer subtypes.Methods We developed and utilized a cytogenetically normal clonal line of hTERT immortalized human mammary epithelial cells in a fibroblast-enhanced co-culture assay to conduct a genome-wide siRNA screen evaluating the functional effect of silencing each gene. Our selection endpoint was inhibition of growth. Rigorous post-screen validation processes including RT-QPCR to ensure on-target silencing, deconvolution of pooled siRNAs, and independent confirmation of effects with lentiviral shRNA constructs, identified a subset of genes required for mammary epithelial cell growth. Using three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel growth/differentiation assays and primary human mammary epithelial cell colony assays, we confirm that these growth effects are not limited to the 184hTERT cell line. We utilized the METABRIC dataset of 1,998 breast cancer patients to evaluate both the differential expression of these genes across breast cancer subtypes and their prognostic significance.ResultsWe identified 47 genes that are critically important for fibroblast-enhanced mammary epithelial cell growth. This group was enriched for several axonal guidance molecules and GPCRs, as well as the endothelin receptor, PROCR. The majority (43 out of 47) of genes identified in 2D were also required for 3D growth, with HSD17B2, SNN, and PROCR showing greater than 10-fold reductions in acinar formation. Several genes, including PROCR and the neuronal pathfinding molecules EFNA4 and NTN1, were also required for proper differentiation/polarization in 3D cultures. The 47 genes identified show a significant non-random enrichment for differential expression among 10 molecular subtypes of breast cancer, sampled from 1,998 patients. CD79A, SERPINH1, KCNJ5, and TMEM14C exhibit breast cancer subtype-independent overall survival differences.Conclusion Diverse transmembrane signals are required for mammary epithelial cell growth in 2D and 3D conditions. Strikingly, we define novel roles for axonal pathfinding receptors and ligands and the endothelin receptor in both growth and differentiation.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 01/2015; 17(1):4. DOI:10.1186/s13058-014-0510-y · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genomic and phenotypic analyses indicate extensive intra- as well as intertumoral hetero- geneity in primary human malignant cell populations despite their clonal origin. Cellular DNA barcoding offers a powerful and unbiased alternative to track the number and size of multiple subclones within a single human tumour xenograft and their response to continued in vivo passaging. Using this approach we find clone-initiating cell frequencies that vary from B1/10 to B1/10,000 cells transplanted for two human breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer xenografts derived from three different patients. For the cell lines, these frequencies are negatively affected in transplants of more than 20,000 cells. Serial transplants reveal five clonal growth patterns (unchanging, expanding, diminishing, fluctuating or of delayed onset), whose predominance is highly variable both between and within original samples. This study thus demonstrates the high growth potential and diverse growth properties of xenografted human breast cancer cells.
    Nature Communications 12/2014; DOI:10.1038/ncomms6871 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human cancers, including breast cancers, comprise clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours. However, the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours have not been systematically examined at single-cell resolution. Here we show, using deep-genome and single-cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (<5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single-cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies using patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment.
    Nature 11/2014; DOI:10.1038/nature13952 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    Samuel Aparicio, Elaine Mardis
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    ABSTRACT: Background IntClust is a classification of breast cancer comprising ten subtypes based on molecular drivers identified through the integration of genomic and transcriptomic data from 1,000 breast tumors and validated in a further 1,000. We present a reliable method for subtyping breast tumors into the IntClust subtypes based on gene expression and demonstrate the clinical and biological validity of the IntClust classification.ResultsWe developed a gene expression-based approach for classifying breast tumors into the ten IntClust subtypes by using the ensemble profile of the index discovery dataset. We evaluate this approach in 983 independent samples for which the combined copy-number and gene expression IntClust classification was available. Only 24 samples are discordantly classified. Next, we compile a consolidated external dataset composed of a further 7,544 breast tumors. We use our approach to classify all samples into the IntClust subtypes. All ten subtypes are observable in most studies at comparable frequencies. The IntClust subtypes are significantly associated with relapse-free survival and recapitulate patterns of survival observed previously. In studies of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, IntClust reveals distinct patterns of chemosensitivity. Finally, patterns of expression of genomic drivers reported by TCGA are better explained by IntClust as compared to the PAM50 classifier.Conclusions IntClust subtypes are reproducible in a large meta-analysis, show clinical validity and best capture variation in genomic drivers. IntClust is a driver-based breast cancer classification and is likely to become increasingly relevant as more targeted biological therapies become available.
    Genome Biology 08/2014; 15(8):431. DOI:10.1186/PREACCEPT-1094756427137059 · 10.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The evolution of cancer genomes within a single tumor creates mixed cell populations with divergent somatic mutational landscapes. Inference of tumor subpopulations has been disproportionately focused on the assessment of somatic point mutations, whereas computational methods targeting evolutionary dynamics of copy number alterations (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in whole genome sequencing data remain under-developed. We present a novel probabilistic model, TITAN, to infer CNA and LOH events while accounting for mixtures of cell populations, thereby estimating the proportion of cells harboring each event. We evaluate TITAN on idealized mixtures, simulating clonal populations from whole genome sequences taken from genomically heterogeneous ovarian tumor sites collected from the same patient. In addition, we show in 23 whole genomes of breast tumors that inference of CNA and LOH using TITAN critically inform population structure and the nature of the evolving cancer genome. Finally, we experimentally validated subclonal predictions using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and single-cell sequencing from an ovarian cancer patient sample, thereby recapitulating the key modeling assumptions of TITAN.
    Genome Research 07/2014; 24(11). DOI:10.1101/gr.180281.114 · 13.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The gut endocrine system is emerging as a central player in the control of appetite and glucose homeostasis, and as a rich source of peptides with therapeutic potential in the field of diabetes and obesity. In this study we have explored the physiology of insulin-like peptide 5 (Insl5), which we identified as a product of colonic enteroendocrine L-cells, better known for their secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptideYY. i.p. Insl5 increased food intake in wild-type mice but not mice lacking the cognate receptor Rxfp4. Plasma Insl5 levels were elevated by fasting or prolonged calorie restriction, and declined with feeding. We conclude that Insl5 is an orexigenic hormone released from colonic L-cells, which promotes appetite during conditions of energy deprivation.
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    ABSTRACT: BRCA2 mutations are significantly associated with early onset breast cancer, and the tumour suppressing function of BRCA2 has been attributed to its involvement in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair. In order to identify additional functions of BRCA2, we generated BRCA2-knockout HCT116 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Using genome-wide microarray analyses, we have discovered a link between the loss of BRCA2 and the up-regulation of a subset of interferon (IFN)-related genes, including APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G. The over-expression of IFN-related genes was confirmed in different human BRCA2−/− and mouse Brca2−/− tumour cell lines, and was independent of senescence and apoptosis. In isogenic wild type BRCA2 cells, we observed over-expression of IFN-related genes after treatment with DNA-damaging agents, and following ionizing radiation. Cells with endogenous DNA damage because of defective BRCA1 or RAD51 also exhibited over-expression of IFN-related genes. Transcriptional activity of the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) was increased in BRCA2 knockout cells, and the expression of BRCA2 greatly decreased IFN-α stimulated ISRE reporter activity, suggesting that BRCA2 directly represses the expression of IFN-related genes through the ISRE. Finally, the colony forming capacity of BRCA2 knockout cells was significantly reduced in the presence of either IFN-β or IFN-γ, suggesting that IFNs may have potential as therapeutic agents in cancer cells with BRCA2 mutations.
    The Journal of Pathology 07/2014; 234(3). DOI:10.1002/path.4404 · 7.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypomethylating agents are widely used in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, it is not well understood why only some patients respond to hypomethylating agents. We found previously that the effect of decitabine on hematopoietic stem cell viability differed between Mll5 wildtype and null cells. We therefore investigated the role of MLL5 expression levels on outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients who were treated with decitabine. MLL5 above the median expression level predicted longer overall survival independent of DNMT3A mutation status in bivariate analysis (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression, 292 vs. 167 days, P=.026). In patients who received 3 or more courses decitabine, high MLL5 expression and wildtype DNMT3A independently predicted improved overall survival (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression, 468 vs. 243 days, P=.012). In transformed murine cells, loss of Mll5 was associated with resistance to low-dose decitabine, less global DNA methylation in promoter regions, and reduced DNA demethylation upon decitabine treatment. Together, these data support our clinical observation of improved outcome in decitabine treated patients who express MLL5 at high levels, and suggest a mechanistic role of MLL5 in the regulation of DNA methylation.
    Haematologica 06/2014; 99(9). DOI:10.3324/haematol.2013.101386 · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The histone methyltransferase EZH2 is frequently mutated in germinal center-derived diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL). To further characterize these EZH2 mutations in lymphomagenesis, we generated a mouse line where EZH2(Y641F) is expressed from a lymphocyte-specific promoter. Spleen cells isolated from the transgenic mice displayed a global increase in tri-methylated H3K27, but the mice did not show an increased tendency to develop lymphoma. As EZH2 mutations often coincide with other mutations in lymphoma we combined the expression of EZH2(Y641F) by crossing these transgenic mice with Eμ-Myc transgenic mice. We observed a dramatic acceleration of lymphoma development in this combination model of Myc and EZH2(Y641F). The lymphomas show histological features of high-grade disease with a shift towards a more mature B cell phenotype, increased cycling and gene expression and epigenetic changes involving important pathways in B cell regulation and function. Furthermore, they initiate disease in secondary recipients. In summary, EZH2(Y641F) can collaborate with Myc to accelerate lymphomagenesis demonstrating a cooperative role of EZH2 mutations in oncogenesis. This murine lymphoma model provides a new tool to study global changes in the epigenome caused by this frequent mutation and a promising model system for testing novel treatments.
    Blood 05/2014; 123(25). DOI:10.1182/blood-2012-12-473439 · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In breast cancer, the TP53 gene is frequently mutated and the mutations have been associated with poor prognosis. The prognostic impact of the different types of TP53 mutations across the different molecular subtypes is still poorly understood. Here, we characterize the spectrum and prognostic significance of TP53 mutations with respect to the PAM50 subtypes and Integrative Clusters (IC). Experimental design: TP53 mutation status was obtained for 1420 tumor samples from the METABRIC cohort by sequencing all coding exons using the Sanger method. TP53 mutations were found in 28.3% of the tumors, conferring a worse overall and breast cancer specific survival (HR=2.03, 95%CI=1.65-2.48, p<0.001), and were also found to be an independent marker of poor prognosis in estrogen receptor positive cases (HR=1.86, 95%CI=1.39-2.49, p<0.001). The mutation spectrum of TP53 varied between the breast cancer subtypes, and individual alterations showed subtype specific association. TP53 mutations were associated with increased mortality in patients with Luminal B, HER2-enriched and Normal-like tumors, but not in patients with Luminal A and Basal-like tumors. Similar observations were made in ICs, where mutation associated with poorer outcome in IC1, IC4 and IC5. The combined effect of TP53 mutation, TP53 LOH and MDM2 amplification on mortality was additive. This study reveals that TP53 mutations have different clinical relevance in molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and suggests diverse roles for TP53 in the biology underlying breast cancer development.
    Clinical Cancer Research 05/2014; 20(13). DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-2943 · 8.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5 0 truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context.
    Nature Communications 04/2014; DOI:10.1038/ncomms4644 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce PyClone, a statistical model for inference of clonal population structures in cancers. PyClone is a Bayesian clustering method for grouping sets of deeply sequenced somatic mutations into putative clonal clusters while estimating their cellular prevalences and accounting for allelic imbalances introduced by segmental copy-number changes and normal-cell contamination. Single-cell sequencing validation demonstrates PyClone's accuracy.
    Nature Methods 03/2014; DOI:10.1038/nmeth.2883 · 23.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amplification of the EMSY gene in sporadic breast and ovarian cancers is a poor prognostic indicator. Although EMSY has been linked to transcriptional silencing, its mechanism of action is unknown. Here, we report that EMSY acts as an oncogene, causing the transformation of cells in vitro and potentiating tumor formation and metastatic features in vivo. We identify an inverse correlation between EMSY amplification and miR-31 expression, an antimetastatic microRNA, in the METABRIC cohort of human breast samples. Re-expression of miR-31 profoundly reduced cell migration, invasion, and colony-formation abilities of cells overexpressing EMSY or haboring EMSY amplification. We show that EMSY is recruited to the miR-31 promoter by the DNA binding factor ETS-1, and it represses miR-31 transcription by delivering the H3K4me3 demethylase JARID1b/PLU-1/KDM5B. Altogether, these results suggest a pathway underlying the role of EMSY in breast cancer and uncover potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in sporadic breast cancer.
    Molecular cell 02/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.molcel.2014.01.029 · 14.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular barcoding offers a powerful approach to characterize the growth and differentiation activity of large numbers of cotransplanted stem cells. Here, we describe a lentiviral genomic-barcoding and analysis strategy and its use to compare the clonal outputs of transplants of purified mouse and human basal mammary epithelial cells. We found that both sources of transplanted cells produced many bilineage mammary epithelial clones in primary recipients, although primary clones containing only one detectable mammary lineage were also common. Interestingly, regardless of the species of origin, many clones evident in secondary recipients were not detected in the primary hosts, and others that were changed from appearing luminal-restricted to appearing bilineage. This barcoding methodology has thus revealed conservation between mice and humans of a previously unknown diversity in the growth and differentiation activities of their basal mammary epithelial cells stimulated to grow in transplanted hosts.
    Cell Stem Cell 01/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.stem.2013.12.011 · 22.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Complex focal chromosomal rearrangements in cancer genomes, also called “firestorms”, can be scored from DNA copy number data. The complex arm-wise aberration index (CAAI) is a score that captures DNA copy number alterations that appear as focal complex events in tumors, and has potential prognostic value in breast cancer. This study aimed to validate this DNA-based prognostic index in breast cancer and test for the first time its potential prognostic value in ovarian cancer. Copy number alteration (CNA) data from 1950 breast carcinomas (METABRIC cohort) and 508 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (TCGA dataset) were analyzed. Cases were classified CAAI positive if at least one complex focal event was scored. Complex alterations were frequently localized on chromosome 8p (n = 159), 17q (n = 176) and 11q (n = 251). CAAI events on 11q were most frequent in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases and on 17q in estrogen receptor negative (ER−) cases. We found only a modest correlation between CAAI and the overall rate of genomic instability (GII) and number of breakpoints (r = 0.27 and r = 0.42, p < 0.001). Breast cancer specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer progression free survival (PFS) were used as clinical end points in Cox proportional hazard model survival analyses. CAAI positive breast cancers (43%) had higher mortality: hazard ratio (HR) of 1.94 (95%CI, 1.62–2.32) for BCSS, and of 1.49 (95%CI, 1.30–1.71) for OS. Representations of the 70-gene and the 21-gene predictors were compared with CAAI in multivariable models and CAAI was independently significant with a Cox adjusted HR of 1.56 (95%CI, 1.23–1.99) for ER+ and 1.55 (95%CI, 1.11–2.18) for ER− disease. None of the expression-based predictors were prognostic in the ER− subset. We found that a model including CAAI and the two expression-based prognostic signatures outperformed a model including the 21-gene and 70-gene signatures but excluding CAAI. Inclusion of CAAI in the clinical prognostication tool PREDICT significantly improved its performance. CAAI positive ovarian cancers (52%) also had worse prognosis: HRs of 1.3 (95%CI, 1.1–1.7) for PFS and 1.3 (95%CI, 1.1–1.6) for OS. This study validates CAAI as an independent predictor of survival in both ER+ and ER− breast cancer and reveals a significant prognostic value for CAAI in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.
    Molecular Oncology 01/2014; 9(1). DOI:10.1016/j.molonc.2014.07.019 · 5.94 Impact Factor
  • Hong Xu, Peter Eirew, Sarah C Mullaly, Samuel Aparicio
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    ABSTRACT: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) do not represent a single disease subgroup and are often aggressive breast cancers with poor prognoses. Unlike estrogen/progesterone receptor and HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) breast cancers, which are responsive to targeted treatments, there is no effective targeted therapy for TNBC, although approximately 50% of patients respond to conventional chemotherapies, including taxanes, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, and platinum salts.Content:Genomic studies have helped clarify some of the possible disease groupings that make up TNBC. We discuss the findings, including copy number- transcriptome analysis, whole genome sequencing, and exome sequencing, in terms of the biological properties and phenotypes that make up the constellation of TNBC. The relationships between subgroups defined by transcriptome and genome analysis are discussed.Summary:TNBC is not a uniform molecular or disease entity but a constellation of variably well-defined biological properties whose relationship to each other is not understood. There is good support for the existence of a basal expression subtype, p53 mutated, high-genomic instability subtype of TNBC. This should be considered a distinct TNBC subtype. Other subtypes with variable degrees of supporting evidence exist within the nonbasal/p53wt (wild-type p53) TNBC, including a group of TNBC with PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) pathway activation that have better overall prognosis than the basal TNBC. Consistent molecular phenotyping of TNBC by whole genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and functional studies with patient-derived tumor xenograft models will be essential components in clinical and biological studies as means of resolving this heterogeneity.
    Clinical Chemistry 12/2013; 60(1). DOI:10.1373/clinchem.2013.207167 · 7.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage) along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3), the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.
    PLoS ONE 10/2013; 8(10):e77020. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0077020 · 3.53 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

10k Citations
1,646.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2015
    • BC Cancer Research Centre
      • Department of Molecular Oncology
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    • Terry Fox Laboratory
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2010–2014
    • BC Cancer Agency
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2007–2014
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2013
    • Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
      • Cancer Genome Project
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2012
    • Lund University
      • Department of Oncology
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 1996–2012
    • University of Cambridge
      • • Department of Oncology
      • • Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour
      • • Department of Medicine
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2000
    • Medical Research Council (UK)
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1997
    • Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom