Frank J Yuk

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Borough of Manhattan, New York, United States

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Publications (8)44.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Subjects with common variable immune deficiency (CVID) may have mutations in trans-membrane activator calcium modulator and cyclophylin ligand interactor (TACI). Unlike the murine gene, human TACI undergoes alternative mRNA splicing to produce isoforms with one or two ligand-binding domains. Since both are found in human B cells, we compared their functions in transduced murine B and human pre-B cells. While murine cells and even more dramatically, pre-B cells transduced with the long TACI isoform, retained surface CD19 and IgG, cells transduced with the TACI short isoform completely lost these B cell characteristics. Expression of the short TACI isoform produced intense NF-κB activation, nuclear p65 translocation and colocalization with MyD88 and CAML. The short TACI transduced cells became larger, CD138(+) with upregulated BLIMP1 and XBP1 mRNA, and acquired the morphology of plasma cells. In contrast, cells bearing the long isoform had significantly less BLIMP1 and XBP1 mRNA and for human pre-B cells, remained CD138(neg). While human B cells express both isoforms, the short isoform predominates in CD27(+) B cells, TLR9-activated peripheral B cells and splenic marginal zone B cells. While the transcriptional controls for alternative splicing of isoforms remain unknown, differential signals via isoforms may control plasma cell generation in humans. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hematology.
    Blood 01/2015; DOI:10.1182/blood-2014-05-575845 · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mounting evidence suggests that soluble oligomers of amyloid-beta (oAbeta) represent the pertinent synaptotoxic form of Abeta in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the mechanistic links between oAbeta and synaptic degeneration remain elusive. Most in vivo experiments to date have been limited to examining the toxicity of oAbeta in mouse models that also possess insoluble fibrillar Abeta (fAbeta), and data generated from these models can lead to ambiguous interpretations. Our goal in the present study was to examine the effects of soluble oAbeta on neuronal and synaptic structure in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) E693Q ("Dutch") mouse model of AD, which develops intraneuronal accumulation of soluble oAbeta with no detectable plaques in AD-relevant brain regions. We performed quantitative analyses of neuronal pathology, including dendrite morphology, spine density, and synapse ultrastructure in individual hippocampal CA1 neurons.
    Molecular Neurodegeneration 10/2014; 9(1):41. DOI:10.1186/1750-1326-9-41 · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of injury in the military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to examine whether blast exposure affects the cerebral vasculature in a rodent model. We analyzed the brains of rats exposed to single or multiple (three) 74.5 kPa blast exposures, conditions that mimic a mild TBI. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours or between 6 and 10 months after exposure. Blast-induced cerebral vascular pathology was examined by a combination of light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy.
    06/2014; 2(1):67. DOI:10.1186/2051-5960-2-67
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    ABSTRACT: Humans and nonhuman primates are vulnerable to age- and menopause-related decline in working memory, a cognitive function reliant on the energy-demanding recurrent excitation of neurons within Brodmann's Area 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the number and morphology (straight, curved, or donut-shaped) of mitochondria in dlPFC presynaptic boutons are altered with aging and menopause in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and that these metrics correlate with delayed response (DR) accuracy, a well-characterized measure of dlPFC-dependent working memory. Although presynaptic bouton density or size was not significantly different across groups distinguished by age or menses status, DR accuracy correlated positively with the number of total and straight mitochondria per dlPFC bouton. In contrast, DR accuracy correlated inversely with the frequency of boutons containing donut-shaped mitochondria, which exhibited smaller active zone areas and fewer docked synaptic vesicles than those with straight or curved mitochondria. We then examined the effects of estrogen administration to test whether a treatment known to improve working memory influences mitochondrial morphology. Aged ovariectomized monkeys treated with vehicle displayed significant working memory impairment and a concomitant 44% increase in presynaptic donut-shaped mitochondria, both of which were reversed with cyclic estradiol treatment. Together, our data suggest that hormone replacement therapy may benefit cognitive aging, in part by promoting mitochondrial and synaptic health in the dlPFC.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 12/2013; 111(1). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1311310110 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a significant cause of injury in the military operations of Iraq and Afghanistan, affecting as many as 10-20% of returning veterans. However, how blast waves affect the brain is poorly understood. To understand their effects, we analyzed the brains of rats exposed to single or multiple (three) 74.5 kPa blast exposures, conditions that mimic a mild TBI. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours or between 4 and 10 months after exposure. Intraventricular hemorrhages were commonly observed after 24 hrs. A screen for neuropathology did not reveal any generalized histopathology. However, focal lesions resembling rips or tears in the tissue were found in many brains. These lesions disrupted cortical organization resulting in some cases in unusual tissue realignments. The lesions frequently appeared to follow the lines of penetrating cortical vessels and microhemorrhages were found within some but not most acute lesions. These lesions likely represent a type of shear injury that is unique to blast trauma. The observation that lesions often appeared to follow penetrating cortical vessels suggests a vascular mechanism of injury and that blood vessels may represent the fault lines along which the most damaging effect of the blast pressure is transmitted.
    08/2013; 1(1):51. DOI:10.1186/2051-5960-1-51
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    ABSTRACT: Age-related impairments of executive functions appear to be related to reductions of the number and plasticity of dendritic spine synapses in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Experimental evidence suggests that synaptic plasticity is mediated by the spine actin cytoskeleton, and a major pathway regulating actin-based plasticity is controlled by phosphorylated LIM kinase (pLIMK). We asked whether aging resulted in altered synaptic density, morphology, and pLIMK expression in the rat prelimbic region of the PFC. Using unbiased electron microscopy, we found an approximate 50% decrease in the density of small synapses with aging, while the density of large synapses remained unchanged. Postembedding immunogold revealed that pLIMK localized predominantly to the postsynaptic density where it was increased in aging synapses by approximately 50%. Furthermore, the age-related increase in pLIMK occurred selectively within the largest subset of prelimbic PFC synapses. Because pLIMK is known to inhibit actin filament plasticity, these data support the hypothesis that age-related increases in pLIMK may explain the stability of large synapses at the expense of their plasticity.
    Neurobiology of aging 06/2012; 34(1). DOI:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2012.05.014 · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rhesus monkeys provide a valuable model for studying the neurobiological basis of cognitive aging, because they are vulnerable to age-related memory decline in a manner similar to humans. In this study, young and aged monkeys were first tested on a well characterized recognition memory test (delayed nonmatching-to-sample; DNMS). Then, electron microscopic immunocytochemistry was performed to determine the subcellular localization of two proteins in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG): the GluA2 subunit of the glutamate AMPA receptor and the atypical protein kinase C ζ isoform (PKMζ). PKMζ promotes memory storage by regulating GluA2-containing AMPA receptor trafficking. Thus, we examined whether the distribution of GluA2 and PKMζ is altered with aging in DG axospinous synapses and whether it is coupled with memory deficits. Monkeys with faster DNMS task acquisition and more accurate recognition memory exhibited higher proportions of dendritic spines coexpressing GluA2 and PKMζ. These double-labeled spines had larger synapses, as measured by postsynaptic density area, than single-labeled and unlabeled spines. Within this population of double-labeled spines, aged monkeys compared with young expressed a lower density of synaptic GluA2 immunogold labeling, which correlated with lower recognition accuracy. Additionally, higher density of synaptic PKMζ labeling in double-labeled spines correlated with both faster task acquisition and better retention. Together, these findings suggest that age-related impairment in maintenance of GluA2 at the synapse in the primate hippocampus is coupled with memory deficits.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 05/2012; 32(21):7336-44. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0605-12.2012 · 6.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive functions that require the prefrontal cortex are highly sensitive to aging in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents, although the neurobiological correlates of this vulnerability remain largely unknown. It has been proposed that dendritic spines represent the primary site of structural plasticity in the adult brain, and recent data have supported the hypothesis that aging is associated with alterations of dendritic spine morphology and plasticity in prefrontal cortex. However, no study to date has directly examined whether aging alters the capacity for experience-dependent spine plasticity in aging prefrontal neurons. To address this possibility, we used young, middle-aged, and aged rats in a behavioral stress paradigm known to produce spine remodeling in prefrontal cortical neurons. In young rats, stress resulted in dendritic spine loss and altered patterns of spine morphology; in contrast, spines from middle-aged and aged animals were remarkably stable and did not show evidence of remodeling. The loss of stress-induced spine plasticity observed in aging rats occurred alongside robust age-related reductions in spine density and shifts in remaining spine morphology. Together, the data presented here provide the first evidence that experience-dependent spine plasticity is altered by aging in prefrontal cortex, and support a model in which dendritic spines become progressively less plastic in the aging brain.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 05/2011; 31(21):7831-9. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0839-11.2011 · 6.75 Impact Factor