Elena M Glinka

Russian Academy of Sciences, Moskva, Moscow, Russia

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Publications (17)14.89 Total impact

  • Elena M Glinka
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Gene therapy has attracted attention for its potential to specifically and efficiently target cancer cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. At present, it offers a promising direction for the treatment of cancer patients. Numerous vectors have been engineered for the sole purpose of killing cancer cells, and some have successfully suppressed malignant tumours. Many plant proteins have anticancer properties; consequently, genes encoding some of these proteins are being used to design constructs for the inhibition of multiplying cancer cells. Results: Data addressing the function of vectors harbouring genes specifically encoding ricin, saporin, lunasin, linamarase, and tomato thymidine kinase 1 under the control of different promoters are summarised here. Constructs employing genes to encode cytotoxic proteins as well as constructs employing genes of enzymes that convert a nontoxic prodrug into a toxic drug are considered here. Conclusion: Generation of eukaryotic expression vectors containing genes encoding plant proteins for killing of cancer cells may permit the broadening of cancer gene therapy strategy, particularly because of the specific mode of action of anticancer plant proteins.
    Cancer epidemiology. 10/2013;
  • Elena M Glinka
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer gene therapy is a promising direction for the treatment of cancer patients. A primary goal of all cancer therapies is to selectively target and kill tumour cells. Such therapies are administered via different approaches, including both viral and non-viral delivery; however, both methods have advantages and disadvantages. Transcriptional targeting enables genes encoding toxic proteins to be expressed directly in cancer cells. Numerous vectors have been created with the purpose of killing cancer cells, and some have successfully suppressed malignant tumours. Data concerning the function of vectors bearing genes that encode cytotoxic proteins under the control of different promoters, including tissue/tumour specific and constitutive promoters, is summarised here. This review focuses on vectors that bear genes encoding diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, caspases, gef, streptolysin, and melittin. Data describing the efficacy of such vectors have been summarised. Notably, there are vectors that killed cancer cell lines originating from the same type of cancer with differential efficiency. Thus, there is differential inhibition of cancer cell growth dependent on the cell line. In this review, the constructs employing genes whose expression induces cell death and the efficiency with which they suppress cancer cell growth will be summarised.
    Plasmid 05/2012; 68(2):69-85. · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Elena M Glinka, Yu-Cai Liao
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    ABSTRACT: Fusarium asiaticum is the predominant causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB) in China. When grown in liquid cultures containing potato tuber extract as the sole carbon source, F. asiaticum (strain 7071) from wheat (China) produced pectin methylesterase (PME), polygalacturonase (PG), and pectin lyase (PNL). The activity of these pectolytic enzymes was detected by a gel diffusion assay. Three forms of PME were identified in a culture filtrate of F. asiaticum. Two forms of PME with molecular weights of 31 kDa and 42.5 kDa, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), were purified using a combination of chromatographic techniques. These PMEs did not bind to Concanavalin A (Con A), which was confirmed by rechromatography using a Con A agarose column. The 31 kDa purified PME was thermostable in a temperature range of 25-55 °C. The optimal pH for the PME of F. asiaticum was 6.5. This research provides the basis for future investigations of pectolytic enzymes from F. asiaticum.
    Fungal Biology 11/2011; 115(11):1112-21. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor-targeted vectors encoding toxic protein genes are promising tools for treating malignant tumors. We used the pEGFP-N1 vector to construct a novel plasmid (pCMV-ETA-EGFP) for eukaryotic expression of a truncated Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) that is known to inhibit protein synthesis, and subsequently induce cell death, by inactivation of elongation factor-2. ETA was linked to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, and ETA-EGFP gene expression was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The time-lapse effects of pCMV-ETA-EGFP expression were examined in transiently transfected HeLa cells. HeLa cells transfected with pCMV-ETA-EGFP or cotransfected with pCMV-ETA-EGFP and small er, Cyrilliccapital IE, CyrillicGFP-N1 showed lower fluorescence intensity than cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 alone. Analysis of the number of dead cells further confirmed the highly toxic effect of the ETA-EGFP fusion protein on cells transfected with pCMV-ETA-EGFP or cotransfected with pCMV-ETA-EGFP and small er, Cyrilliccapital IE, CyrillicGFP-N1. ETA-EGFP fusion protein induced apoptotic cell death through the caspase-3 activation. By using the antibody against a marker nucleolar antigen A3 [Grigoryev, A.A., Bulycheva, T.I., Sheval, E.V., Kalinina, I.A., Zatsepina, O.V., 2008. Cytological indicators of the overall suppression of protein synthesis revealed by staining with new monoclonal antibody. Cell Tissue Biol. 2, 191-199], the distribution of which changes when HeLa cells are treated with known translation inhibitors, we obtained evidence to support the idea that protein synthesis is inhibited in transfected cells in situ. ETA-EGFP fusion protein was identified in lysates of transfected cells using anti-GFP-BL antibodies. Collectively, our results indicate that HeLa cells transfected with pCMV-ETA-EGFP synthesize the ETA-EGFP fusion protein that efficiently inhibits protein synthesis, leading to massive cell death by an apoptosis-mediated pathway with a participation of caspase-3. The constructed vector can be used in suicidal gene therapy of cancer and may also be useful for investigating the general effects of translational downregulation in human cancer cells. We also suggest a novel approach for detecting the activity of new vectors in transfected cells, which is based on the redistribution of nucleolar proteins in transfected cells.
    Plasmid 07/2009; 62(2):119-27. · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: Fusarium mycotoxins directly accumulated in grains during the infection of wheat and other cereal crops by Fusarium head blight (FHB) pathogens are detrimental to humans and domesticated animals. Prevention of the mycotoxins via the development of FHB-resistant varieties has been a challenge due to the scarcity of natural resistance against FHB pathogens. Various antibodies specific to Fusarium fungi and mycotoxins are widely used in immunoassays and antibody-mediated resistance in planta against Fusarium pathogens has been demonstrated. Antibodies fused to antifungal proteins have been shown to confer a very significantly enhanced Fusarium resistance in transgenic plants. Thus, antibody fusions hold great promise as an effective tool for the prevention of mycotoxin contaminations in cereal grains. This review highlights the utilization of protective antibodies derived from phage display to increase endogenous resistance of wheat to FHB pathogens and consequently to reduce mycotoxins in field. The role played by Fusarium-specific antibody in the resistance is also discussed.
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences 11/2008; 9(10):1915-26. · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • E M Glinka, E F Edelweiss, S M Deyev
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    ABSTRACT: This review considers ways to address specificity to therapeutic targeted anticancer agents. These include transcriptional activation of tissue- and tumor-specific promoters in eukaryotic expression vectors and use of antitumor-directed immunoconjugates. The review deals with analysis of strategies used for selection of targeted promoters and examples of antibody fusion proteins exhibiting antitumor activity. A new direction in antitumor treatment pooling together methods of gene therapy and antibody therapy has appeared. This direction is based on the development of vectors encoding secreted forms of immunoconjugates. After vector introduction into a cell, the latter is capable of synthesizing and secreting antibody fusion protein composed of a therapeutic anticancer agent and antibody specifically targeted to cancer cells.
    Biochemistry (Moscow) 07/2006; 71(6):597-606. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor-targeted vectors with controllable expression of therapeutic genes and specific antitumor antibodies are promising tools for the reduction of malignant tumors. Here we describe a new plasmid for the eukaryotic expression of an anti-HER2/neu mini-antibody-barnase fusion protein (4D5 scFv-barnase-His(5)) with an NH(2)-terminal leader peptide. The 4D5 scFv-barnase-His(5) gene was placed downstream of the tetracycline responsive-element minimal promoter in the vector using the Tet-Off gene-expression system. The Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ribonuclease barnase is toxic for the host cells. To overcome this problem, barstar gene under its own minimal cytomegalovirus promoter was used in designed vector. Barstar inhibits the background level of barnase in the cells in the presence of tetracycline in culture medium. The HEK 293T cells were transfected with the designed vector, and the 4D5 scFv-barnase-His(5) fusion protein was identified by anti-barnase antibodies in cell culture medium and after purification from cell lysates using metal-affinity chromatography. The overexpression of the anti-HER2/neu mini-antibody-barnase fusion protein decreased the intensity of fluorescence of HEK 293T cells co-transfected with the generated plasmid and a plasmid containing the gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-N1), in comparison with the intensity of fluorescence of HEK 293T cells transfected with pEGFP-N1, in the absence of tetracycline in the medium. The effect of the 4D5 scFv-barnase-His(5) on EGFP fluorescence indicates that the introduced barnase functions as a ribonuclease inside the cells. The anti-HER2/neu mini-antibody could be used to deliver barnase to HER2/neu-positive cells and provide its penetration into the target cells, as HER2/neu is a ligand-internalizing receptor. This expression vector has potential applications to both gene and antibody therapies of cancer.
    Gene 02/2006; 366(1):97-103. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied changes in the intensity of ethylene release and accumulation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid during ripening of two apple cultivars, differing in their physiological state, following treatment with haloethane derivatives or L--(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)-glycine. This changed both the activity of the protein polygalacturonase inhibitor in the fruit tissue and the accumulation of oligouronides. The data suggest that pretreatment with an inhibitor of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase affects ethylene release, accumulation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, the activity of the protein polygalacturonase inhibitor, and the potential intensity of oligouronide formation in apple fruits and tissues.
    Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology 06/2003; 39(4):407-410. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of the polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) on the rate of oligouronide formation were studied in a model system containing polygalacturonic acid and polygalacturonase (PG) from the culture medium of phytopathogenic fungi. PGIP preparations were prepared from stored potato tubers and sprouts and also from apple fruits. The PGIP effects on oligouronide synthesis depended markedly on the physiological state of the source plant. Apple cultivars differing in their earliness differed in PGIP effects as well. The PGIP from potato tubers, which were in deep dormancy, suppressed oligouronide formation. The inhibitory PGIP action was decreased after dormancy release and tuber sprouting, which resulted in the oligouronide accumulation. The effects of PGIP from apple fruits on the oligouronide synthesis in the system containing PG from various phytopathogenic fungi were not correlated with tissue damage induced by these fungi. The PGIP effects on oligouronide formation are evident; however, their role in plant-cell processes related to the pectin compound conversions and plant resistance to diseases remains to be elucidated.
    Russian Journal of Plant Physiology 02/2003; 50(2):232-236. · 0.62 Impact Factor
  • E. M. Glinka, M. A. Protsenko
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    ABSTRACT: The activity of a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein was determined in growing potato plants and in stored potato tubers. The activity in leaves was higher than in stems, and it decreased by the end of the vegetative season. During the dormancy period, the inhibitory activity in tubers also changed. In the sprouting tubers, it was somewhat lower than in the nonsprouting ones, and, in sprouts, it was usually higher than in tubers. Both the plant polygalacturonase and the polygalacturonase secreted by phytopathogenic fungi after their penetration in plant tissues can serve as inhibitor's targets. Therefore, the inhibitor seems to control the resistance of plants to infection by particular pathogens, and this resistance is characteristic of definite developmental stages.
    Russian Journal of Plant Physiology 10/2001; 48(6):770-773. · 0.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A protein polygalacturonidase inhibitor isolated from fruit of the apple cultivars Antonovka and Mantuanskoe differently affects the polygalacturonidases of different phytopathogenic fungi. Three groups of fungi were recognized according to the sensitivity of their polygalacturonidases to the inhibitory effect. Storage of apples after harvesting is accompanied by changes in the inhibitor activity, and the time pattern of these changes depends on the cultivar. An increase in the inhibitor activity occurs concurrently with the elevation in ethylene release characteristic of the stage of elevated respiration (a climacteric increase). The data suggest that a decrease in the apple fruit resistance to microbes at the end of the storage period is related, along with other reasons, to a change in the activity of the protein polygalacturonidase inhibitor.
    Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology 08/2001; 37(5):517-520. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ethylene evolution changes were monitored during storage of apple fruits (Malus domestica Borkh., winter variety Mantuanskoe) treated with aminoethoxyvinylglycine and CoCl2. The storage of fruits was shown to be accompanied by changes in the activity of a protein inhibitor of polygalacturonase (PIPG). This inhibitor has been previously isolated from apple fruit tissues. The protein inhibitor of polygalacturonase was also shown to inhibit the activity of an enzyme produced by certain nonpathogenic fungi. The role of PIPG in apple fruit resistance to these fungi is discussed.
    Prikladnaia biokhimiia i mikrobiologiia 01/2001; 37(1):100-4.
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    ABSTRACT: A protein polygalacturonidase inhibitor isolated from fruit of the apple varieties Antonovka and Mantuanskoe differently affects the polygalacturonidases of different phytopathogenic fungi. Three groups of fungi were recognized by the sensitivity of their polygalacturonidases to the inhibitory effect. Storage of apples after harvesting is accompanied by changes in the inhibitor activity, and the time pattern of these changes depends on the variety. An increase in the inhibitor activity occurs concurrently with the elevation in ethylene release characteristic of the stage of elevated respiration (a climacteric increase). The data suggest that a decrease in the apple fruit resistance to microbes at the end of the storage period is related, along with other reasons, to a change in the activity of the protein polygalacturonidase inhibitor.
    Prikladnaia biokhimiia i mikrobiologiia 01/2001; 37(5):607-11.
  • E M Glinka, M A Protsenko
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    ABSTRACT: The activity of a protein inhibitor of polygalacturonase (PIPG) was studied in potato tubers during storage and in potato leaves and stems during vegetation. The activity of PIPG in tubers varied from between seasons. The activity of PIPG during dormancy changed depending on the storage stage and temperature. As a rule, it was higher in etiolated sprouts than in the tubers. The activity of PIPG was slightly higher in leaves of adult vegetating plants than in stems and decreased by the end of vegetation. These changes in the activity of PIPG are suggested to be associated with changes in the growth rate.
    Prikladnaia biokhimiia i mikrobiologiia 01/2000; 36(2):225-8.
  • E. M. Glinka, M. A. Protsenko
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    ABSTRACT: The activity of a protein inhibitor of polygalacturonase (PIPG) was studied in potato tubers during storage and in potato leaves and stems during vegetation. The activity of PIPG in tubers varied between seasons. The activity of PIPG during dormancy changed depending on the storage stage and temperature. As a rule, it was higher in etiolated sprouts than in the tubers. The activity of PIPG was slightly higher in leaves of adult vegetating plants than in stems and decreased by the end of vegetation. These changes in the activity of PIPG are suggested to be associated with changes in the growth rate.
    Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology 01/2000; 36(2):191-193. · 0.69 Impact Factor
  • EM Glinka, MA Protsenko
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    ABSTRACT: Polygalacturonase inhibiting protein (PGIP) is localized in plant cell walls and plays an important role both in pectic substance metabolism and in prevention of the penetration of phytopathogenic microorganisms. Apparently, PGIP is responsible for the specificity of cell--cell interactions during pollination or inoculation by fungi nonpathogenic for the particular plant. PGIPs from different plants share a basic common structure. They are rather thermostable glycoproteins enriched with leucine and contain about 20% carbohydrates; the molecular weight varies between 37-54 kD. The synthesis of PGIP is encoded by one gene, and its expression is stimulated by injury and fungal infection. The resistance of plant tissues to infection frequently correlates with PGIP expression and with inhibiting action on fungal PG. Thus, PGIP is believed to be useful for gene engineering to obtain transgenic plants resistant to fungal infection or retaining commercial value during storage.
    Biochemistry (Moscow) 10/1998; 63(9):1015-20. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied changes in the intensity of ethylene release and accumulation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid during ripening of two apple varieties characterized by various physiological states and treated with halothane derivatives and L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)-glycine. We observed changes in activity of the protein polygalacturonase inhibitor in the fruit tissue and accumulation of oligouronides. The data suggest that pretreatment with the inhibitor of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase affects ethylene release, accumulation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, activity of the protein polygalacturonase inhibitor, and potential intensity of oligouronide formation in apple fruits and tissues.
    Prikladnaia biokhimiia i mikrobiologiia 39(4):461-4.