K. Y. Bridge

University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, United States

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Publications (16)8.54 Total impact

  • R B Young, K Y Bridge, J R Vaughn
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    ABSTRACT: Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 microM isoproterenol, a strong betaAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. betaAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was diminished by twofold. Neither the basal concentration of cAMP nor the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was affected by the 3-d exposure to isoproterenol. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, betaAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 betaM forskolin for 3 d. The basal concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to sevenfold in a dose-dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in betaAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 microM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 microM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 microM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the betaAR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes was affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.
    In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal 04/2012; 36(7):485-92. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 microM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum, with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle cultures. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 microM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP concentration above the basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were stimulated with 1 microM isoproterenol, cAMP concentration was stimulated 5- to 9-fold above the basal levels. Thus, not only did cells grown in horse serum have a higher betaAR population, but also each receptor had a higher capacity for cAMP synthesis following isoproterenol stimulation. Finally, the hypothesis that clenbuterol exerts its action on muscle protein content by changes in cAMP concentration was tested. No correlation was apparent between basal cAMP concentration and MHC content.
    In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal 03/2002; 38(2):102-10. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • R B Young, K. Y. Bridge, Peter A. Cureri
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    ABSTRACT: Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.
    02/2002;
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    ABSTRACT: Broiler chickens at 35 days of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 days. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-day period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and breast muscle groups of twelve-day chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 micron clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 days beginning on the seventh day in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes were significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of MHC was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast and leg muscle cultures; however, MHC quantity was 50- 100% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 nM and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The Beta-AR population was 4,000-7,000 Beta-AR per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum, with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle cultures. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the Beta-AR population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 18,000-20,000 Beta-AR per cell. Basal concentration of cAMP was not significantly affected by any of the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 micron isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP concentration above basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were stimulated with 1 micron isoproterenol, increases of 600-800 % in cAMP concentration above basal levels were observed. Thus, not only did cells grown in horse serum have a higher Beta-AR population, each receptor had a higher capacity for cAMP synthesis following isoproterenol stimulation. Finally, the hypothesis was tested that clenbuterol exerts its action on muscle protein content by changes in cAMP concentration. No correlation was apparent between basal cAMP concentration and MHC content.
    02/2001;
  • R B Young, K Y Bridge, C J Strietzel
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    ABSTRACT: Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.
    In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal 04/2000; 36(3):167-73. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • R B Young, K. Y. Bridge, M. Franklin Rose
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    ABSTRACT: Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.
    02/2000;
  • Ronald B. Young, K. Y. Bridge, J. R. Vaughn
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    ABSTRACT: beta-Adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists have been reported to modulate growth in several mammalian and avian species, and bAR agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through this receptor. Because of the importance of bAR regulation on muscle protein metabolism in muscle cells, the objectives of this study were to determine the developmental expression pattern of the bAR population in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, and to analyze changes in both the quantity and isoform expression of the major muscle protein, myosin. The number of bAR in mononucleated C2C12 cells was approximately 8,000 bAR per cell, which is comparable with the population reported in several other nonmuscle cell types. However, the bar population increased after myoblast fusion to greater than 50,000 bAR per muscle cell equivalent. The reasons for this apparent over-expression of bAR in C2C12 cells is not known. The quantity of myosin also increased after C2C12 myoblast fusion, but the quantity of myosin was less than that reported in primary muscle cell cultures. Finally, at least five different isoforms of myosin heavy chain could be resolved in C2C12 cells, and three of these exhibited either increased or decreased developmental regulation relative to the others. Thus, C2C12 myoblasts undergo developmental regulation of bAR population and myosin heavy chain isoform expression.
    02/2000;
  • R B Young, K Y Bridge, J R Vaughn
    In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal 04/1999; 35(3):115-7. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Ronald B. Young, Jeffrey R. Vaughn, Kristin Y. Bridge
    In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal 02/1999; 35(3):115-117. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Ronald B. Young, Kristin Y. Bridge, Jeffrey R. Vaughn
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    ABSTRACT: Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.
    02/1999;
  • R B Young, K. Y. Bridge
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    ABSTRACT: Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.
    02/1999;
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    ABSTRACT: beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.
    02/1999;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the bAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the bAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. Thus, in chicken muscle cells an enhanced level of contraction reduced the coupling efficiency of bAR for cyclic AMP production by approximately 55% compared to controls. In contrast, the bAR population in rat muscle cells was increased by approximately 25% by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was also increased by almost two-fold. Thus, in rat muscle cells an enhanced level of contraction increased the coupling efficiency of bAR for cyclic AMP production by approximately 50% compared to controls. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in both rat muscle cells and chicken muscle cells were not affected by electrical stimulation.
    02/1999;
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    K Y Bridge, C K Smith, R B Young
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    ABSTRACT: Beta-adrenergic receptors (betaAR) are abundant in fetal, neonatal, and adult skeletal muscles of cattle; however, only minimal levels of functional betaAR were detected in multinucleated muscle cell cultures prepared from 90- to 150-d fetal bovine skeletal muscle. Two other lines of evidence were consistent with low levels of betaAR expression in bovine muscle cultures. First, treating the cells with 10(-6)M isoproterenol for up to 20 min did not increase intracellular cAMP concentration. Second, neither the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) nor its apparent synthesis rate were changed by treating the cells for 4 d with 10(-7) or 10(-6) M isoproterenol. Despite these results, the mRNA for the beta2AR could be detected in muscle cultures by PCR and on slot blots. Thus, the beta2AR mRNA was expressed, but significant levels of functional receptors could not be detected. Glucocorticoids are known to activate expression of OAR genes in several tissues, and the effect of dexamethasone on OAR gene expression in bovine multinucleated muscle cell cultures was evaluated. The intracellular concentration of cAMP following treatment with isoproterenol was elevated 10-fold by dexamethasone, and the population of functional receptors was elevated by approximately 50%. The effect of dexamethasone on muscle protein synthesis and accumulation was analyzed after pretreating the cells with dexamethasone for 24 h, followed by treatment with dexamethasone and 10(-6)M isoproterenol for an additional 48 h. The quantity of MHC synthesized and the apparent synthesis rate of MHC were stimulated by 10 to 35%. These effects seem to be due to posttranscriptional events, because the quantity of beta2AR receptor mRNA on slot blots was not increased by treatment with dexamethasone. Results of this study emphasize the importance of verifying that muscle cells contain functional betaAR when they are used to study the effects of betaAR agonists on muscle protein metabolism.
    Journal of Animal Science 10/1998; 76(9):2382-91. · 2.09 Impact Factor
  • R B Young, J. R. Vaughn, K. Y. Bridge, C K Smith
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    ABSTRACT: Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.
    02/1998;
  • K. Y. Bridge, R B Young, J. R. Vaughn
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    ABSTRACT: Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted by in vivo administration of beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonists. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through the betaAR, and alterations in the population of betaAR could potentially change the ability of the cell to respond to the betaAR agonists. Since the intracellular chemical signal generated by the betaAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of functional betaAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 microM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the betaAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 microM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in betaAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 microM. This increase in PAR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of betaAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 microM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.
    02/1998;