Shilpi Gupta

Staten Island University Hospital, New York, United States

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Publications (12)3.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL) is an extremely uncommon haematological malignancy that has an aggressive course and a grave prognosis. We describe a patient who presented with lymphocytosis, scalp erythema, ascites and splenomegaly and was diagnosed with T-PLL. He was treated with alemtuzumab with a good response and was referred for allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
    Case Reports 01/2013; 2013.
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    ABSTRACT: Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast, a rare neoplasm, usually presents at an advanced stage, metastasises to distant sites more frequently, has higher Ki-67 expression and is more often triple negative compared with other invasive breast cancers. Here, the authors discuss a case of an 84-year-old woman with triple negative mixed metaplastic breast carcinoma treated with radical modified mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection and radiation therapy. Because of the rarity of the disease, the pathogenesis and the management remain controversial, thus contributing to overall poor prognosis.
    Case Reports 01/2012; 2012.
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    ABSTRACT: With an increasing pandemic of HIV/AIDS, the incidence of HIV-associated lymphoma is expected to rise. Here, the authors report a case of a 41-year-old man who presented with right upper quadrant pain and mass, and was subsequently diagnosed with HIV-associated diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with cardiac involvement. This case illustrates some of the uncommon and interesting aspects of DLBCL: primary extramedullary extranodal stage IV disease as the presenting feature; cardiac involvement at presentation; DLBCL as the only clue to the diagnosis of HIV; and management of HIV-associated DLBCL. This case is also a reminder of the importance of the routine HIV screening for all patients between the ages of 13-64 years, as advocated by centres of disease control and prevention.
    Case Reports 01/2012; 2012.
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    ABSTRACT: Mixed warm and cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia runs a chronic course with severe intermittent exacerbations. Therapeutic options for the treatment of hemolysis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia are limited. There have been only two reported cases of the effective use of rituximab in the treatment of patients with mixed autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We report a case of severe mixed autoimmune hemolytic anemia that did not respond to steroids and responded to four weekly doses of rituximab (one cycle). A 62-year-old Caucasian man presented with dyspnea, jaundice and splenomegaly. His blood work revealed severe anemia (hemoglobin, 4.9 g/dL) with biochemical evidence of hemolysis. Exposure to cold led to worsening of the patient's hemolysis and hemoglobinuria. A direct antiglobulin test was positive for immunoglobulin G and complement C3d, and cold agglutinins of immunoglobulin M type were detected. A bone marrow biopsy revealed erythroid hyperplasia. A positron emission tomographic scan showed no sites of pathologic uptake. There was no other evidence of a lymphoid or myeloid disorder. Initial therapy consisted of avoidance of cold, intravenous methylprednisolone and a trial of plasmapheresis. However, there was no clinically significant response, and the patient continued to be transfusion-dependent. He was then started on 375 mg/m2/week intravenous rituximab therapy. After two treatments, his hemoglobin stabilized and the transfusion requirement diminished. Rituximab was continued for a total of four weeks and led to the complete resolution of his hemolytic anemia and associated symptoms. At the patient's last visit, about two years after the initial rituximab treatment, he continued to be in complete remission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia that did not respond to steroid therapy but responded completely to only one cycle of rituximab. The previous two reports of rituximab use in mixed autoimmune hemolytic anemia described an initial brief response to steroids and the use of rituximab at the time of relapse. In both of these case reports, the response to one cycle of rituximab was short-lived and a second cycle of rituximab was required. Our case report demonstrates that severe hemolysis associated with mixed autoimmune hemolytic anemia can be unresponsive to steroid therapy and that a single cycle of rituximab may lead to prompt and durable complete remission.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 01/2011; 5:156.
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    ABSTRACT: Intravascular embolisation of catheter, a relatively uncommon event associated with the use of totally implanted port devices, can have serious cardiovascular, pulmonary and septic complications with an overall mortality of 1.8%. Here, the authors report an asymptomatic patient with pulmonary artery catheter embolisation diagnosed incidentally in a positron emission tomography scan who underwent successful percutaneous extraction of the catheter in an attempt to avoid the possible dreadful complications.
    Case Reports 01/2011; 2011.
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    Shilpi Gupta, Vijaya Raj Bhatt, Seema Varma
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    ABSTRACT: Orbital metastasis is very infrequent in breast cancer; more so as an initial and sole presenting feature. The authors report a case of orbital metastasis of occult breast carcinoma in a 46-year-old woman, who presented with unilateral orbital pain and eyelid swelling. This was initially diagnosed as orbital pseudotumour and treated with steroids. The development of breast symptoms and finding of breast nodule, 3 months later, led to the diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast with orbital metastases, confirmed on biopsy.
    Case Reports 01/2011; 2011.
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    Shilpi Gupta, Vijaya Raj Bhatt, Seema Varma
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    ABSTRACT: Imatinib, the frontline tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), has revolutionised the management of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Severe hepatotoxicity, although uncommon, can occur with this drug. This tends to subside with dose reduction or cessation, but can recur with reintroduction of the drug. Recurrent severe hepatotoxicity mandates permanent discontinuation of imatinib. This can cause difficulties in the management of CML, more so if the patient cannot afford or get access to alternate therapy. Furthermore, alternate therapy, for example, second-line TKIs, can impose a huge economic burden on a healthcare system. Here, the authors report the case of 20-year-old CML patient who developed recurrent hepatotoxicity with the use of imatinib. Introduction of corticosteroids enabled successful reintroduction of imatinib therapy.
    Case Reports 01/2011; 2011.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction. Haptoglobin binds the globin portion of free hemoglobin. Serum haptoglobin measurement is used as a laboratory marker for the diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. Since stored blood contains free hemoglobin, transfusion may affect haptoglobin levels. Study Objectives. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether serum haptoglobin could be measured to assess hemolysis in recently transfused patients. Patients and Methods. Twenty-one patients, receiving more than one unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) for presumed nonhemolytic indications, were enrolled. Serum haptoglobin levels were recorded before, immediately after, and 24 and 48 hours after transfusion. Observations and Results. Analysis of variance with a repeated measures was used to examine the serum haptoglobin levels at different time periods and no significant difference was found (P = .28). Conclusion. The results suggest that serum haptoglobin can be used in the diagnosis of hemolysis in patients receiving multiple units of PRBC.
    Advances in Hematology 01/2011; 2011:389854.
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    ABSTRACT: Renal angiomyolipomas are recognized as clonal neoplasms with clonal chromosomal aberrations and a common progenitor cell, the perivascular epithelial cell (PEC). The epithelioid variant is a recently identified entity, characterized by predominance of PEC and a unique morphologic and immunohistochemical profile. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma (REA) is a malignant disease. We searched the literature for descriptions of clinical behavior of REA. A Pubmed search was performed using the following key words: angiomyolipoma, epithelioid, perivascular epithelial cell or/and renal tumors. We reviewed a case of fatal REA at our institution. A pathologist reviewed slides to confirm the diagnosis. Upon review of 140 articles, 37 eligible articles were found including 10 articles describing the clinical course of REA. Almost all of the patients described, for whom there was a follow-up available, died of neoplastic progression of the disease, with liver, lung and bone metastases. Four cases were reclassified after retrospective pathology review, and they were fatal. Three of these had been misdiagnosed as renal cell carcinoma (RCC), while 1 was diagnosed as classic angiomyolipoma. Unlike commonly benign classic angiomyolipoma, REA behaves aggressively. It is crucial for the clinician to be aware of and identify this epithelioid variant as a malignant disease. It should be carefully differentiated from RCC. Resection alone may not be curative, and adjuvant therapy should be considered. A multimodality treatment approach needs to be explored for this newly recognized malignant variant renal angiomyolipoma.
    Journal of nephrology 03/2010; 24(1):18-22. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Choriocarcinoma is a highly malignant tumor of trophoblastic origin. Most cases present within one year of the antecedent pregnancy (molar or non-molar). However, very rarely, choriocarcinoma can develop from germ cells or from dedifferentiation of endometrial carcinoma into choriocarcinoma. This article concerns a case of choriocarcinoma developing 38 years after the patient's last pregnancy and 23 years after menopause. A 73-year-old African-American woman presented with a three-week history of vaginal bleeding. A vaginal mass was seen on pelvic examination. Ultrasonography showed a thickened complex endometrial echo. Her β-human chorionic gonadotrophin level was found to be elevated (2,704,040 mIU/mL). Vaginal and uterine biopsies were suggestive of choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry tests were positive for β-human chorionic gonadotrophin as well as cytokeratin and negative for octamer binding transcription factor 3/4 and α-fetoprotein, supporting the diagnosis of choriocarcinoma. A combination of etoposide, methotrexate, and dactinomycin, followed by cyclophosphamide and vincristine (the so-called EMA/CO regimen) was initiated. After seven cycles of chemotherapy, her β-human chorionic gonadotrophin level dropped below 5 mIU/mL. Our patient is being followed up at our oncology institute. We report an extremely rare case of choriocarcinoma arising 23 years after menopause. A postmenopausal woman presenting with vaginal bleed from a mass and β-human chorionic gonadotrophin elevation should be evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis to rule out the possibilities of a germ cell origin of the tumor or dedifferentiation of an epithelial tumor. Absence of octamer binding transcription factor 3/4, α-fetoprotein and CD-30 staining helps in exclusion of most germ cell tumors. DNA polymorphism studies can be used to differentiate between gestational and non-gestational tumor origin. These require fresh tissue samples and are time consuming. Finally, the effective first-line therapy for β-human chorionic gonadotrophin-producing high-risk gestational as well as non-gestational trophoblastic tumors is combination chemotherapy (the EMA/CO regimen). Therefore, treatment should be commenced when a potential diagnosis of metastatic trophoblastic tumor is being considered.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 01/2010; 4:379.
  • Journal of clinical rheumatology: practical reports on rheumatic & musculoskeletal diseases 12/2009; 15(8):417-8. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy is not included in the wide spectrum of radiologic findings associated with bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia (BOOP). We present a patient who presented with extensive hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. We suspected a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient was diagnosed with idiopathic BOOP. This is the first case demonstrating that BOOP, now referred to as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), can present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 02/2007; 1:60.