Jean-Olivier Contreres

Paris Diderot University, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Are you Jean-Olivier Contreres?

Claim your profile

Publications (11)97.55 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tumor angiogenesis is closely associated with clinical staging and has been proposed to correlate with clinical response in terms of subsequent metastases following primary resection. Netrin-4 (NT-4) regulates angiogenic responses. Therefore, we sought to examine the effects of NT-4 on the primary tumor growth of colon cancer cells, liver and lung metastases of colon cancer cells, and responses following primary tumor resection. We used 3 different mouse models of orthotopic primary tumor and liver and lung metastases, comparing 2 human colon cancer cells lines: wild-type (low expression of NT-4) and NT-4 (overexpression of NT-4) LS174 cells. NT-4 overexpression inhibited the primary tumor growth of colorectal LS174 xenografts in nude mice (144.3±12.9 vs. 62.4±4.5 mm3; p<0.0001) as well as its related local and systemic recurrence (38 vs. 0%; p<0.01). NT-4 overexpression also markedly decreased colorectal cancer progression in terms of tumor number and volume of liver metastases in the NT-4 group of the orthotopic liver metastasis model (25 vs. 90% and 4±1 vs. 709±190 mm3, p<0.001 and p<0.05). Collectively, our findings indicate that NT-4 overexpression decreases colorectal lung metastasis and its associated lymph node involvement. NT-4 overexpression decreases tumor recurrence and metastasis after surgical resection, likely via an anti-angiogenic effect. These observations suggest that NT-4 may hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer growth and major metastatic sites.
    Oncology Reports 10/2012; · 2.30 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We hypothesized that in vitro treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs) from diabetic patients with ephrin-B2/Fc (EFNB2) improves their proangiogenic therapeutic potential in diabetic ischemic experimental models. Diabetes was induced in nude athymic mice by streptozotocin injections. At 9 weeks after hyperglycemia, 10(5) PB-MNCs from diabetic patients, pretreated by EFNB2, were intravenously injected in diabetic mice with hindlimb ischemia. Two weeks later, the postischemic neovascularization was evaluated. The mechanisms involved were investigated by flow cytometry analysis and in vitro cell biological assays. Paw skin blood flow, angiographic score, and capillary density were significantly increased in ischemic leg of diabetic mice receiving EFNB2-activated diabetic PB-MNCs versus those receiving nontreated diabetic PB-MNCs. EFNB2 bound to PB-MNCs and increased the adhesion and transmigration of PB-MNCs. Finally, EFNB2-activated PB-MNCs raised the number of circulating vascular progenitor cells in diabetic nude mice and increased the ability of endogenous bone marrow MNCs to differentiate into cells with endothelial phenotype and enhanced their proangiogenic potential. Therefore, EFNB2 treatment of PB-MNCs abrogates the diabetes-induced stem/progenitor cell dysfunction and opens a new avenue for the clinical development of an innovative and accessible strategy in diabetic patients with critical ischemic diseases.
    Diabetes 05/2012; 61(10):2621-32. · 7.90 Impact Factor
  • Source
    International Journal of Cancer 11/2011; 129(9):2304-5. · 6.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a transmembrane co-receptor for semaphorins and heparin-binding pro-angiogenic cytokines, principally members of the vascular endothelial growth factor family. Recent studies revealed an important role of NRP1 in angiogenesis and malignant progression of many cancers. The role of NRP1 in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not completely understood. We used human tissue microarrays and a mouse transgenic model of HCC to establish the spatio-temporal patterns of NRP1 expression in HCC. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of targeting NRP1 in HCC, we treated HCC mice with peptide N, an NRP1 binding recombinant protein and competitive inhibitor of the VEGF-A(165)/NRP1 interaction. We demonstrate that NRP1 is expressed in hepatic endothelial cells of both human healthy biopsies and in HCC samples, but not in normal hepatocytes. We found that increased NRP1 expression in human tumour hepatocytes is significantly associated with primary HCC. Using RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis we show that NRP1 expression in the liver of transgenic HCC mice is increased with disease progression, in both vascular and tumour compartments. Blocking NRP1 function with peptide N leads to the inhibition of vascular remodelling and tumour liver growth in HCC mice. Our results indicate a specific role of NRP1 in HCC growth and vascular remodelling and highlight the possibility of therapeutically targeting NRP1 for the treatment of HCC.
    Journal of Hepatology 02/2011; 55(4):866-75. · 9.86 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our findings that PlGF is a cancer target and anti-PlGF is useful for anticancer treatment have been challenged by Bais et al. Here we take advantage of carcinogen-induced and transgenic tumor models as well as ocular neovascularization to report further evidence in support of our original findings of PlGF as a promising target for anticancer therapies. We present evidence for the efficacy of additional anti-PlGF antibodies and their ability to phenocopy genetic deficiency or silencing of PlGF in cancer and ocular disease but also show that not all anti-PlGF antibodies are effective. We also provide additional evidence for the specificity of our anti-PlGF antibody and experiments to suggest that anti-PlGF treatment will not be effective for all tumors and why. Further, we show that PlGF blockage inhibits vessel abnormalization rather than density in certain tumors while enhancing VEGF-targeted inhibition in ocular disease. Our findings warrant further testing of anti-PlGF therapies.
    Cell 04/2010; 141(1):178-90. · 31.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and Aims. An arterial blood supply and phenotypic changes of the sinusoids characterise the liver vasculature in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated the effects of rosuvastatin on liver vessel anomalies, tumour growth and survival in HCC. Methods. We treated transgenic mice developing HCC, characterized by vessel anomalies similar to those of human HCC, with rosuvastatin. Results. In the rosuvastatin group, the survival time was longer (P < .001), and liver weight (P < .01) and nodule surface (P < .01) were reduced. Rosuvastatin decreased the number of smooth muscle actin-positive arteries (P < .05) and prevented the sinusoid anomalies, with decreased laminin expression (P < .001), activated hepatic stellate cells (P < .001), and active Notch4 expression. Furthermore, rosuvastatin inhibited endothelial cell but not tumour hepatocyte functions. Conclusions. Rosuvastatin reduced the vessel anomalies and tumour growth and prolonged survival in HCC. These results represent new mechanisms of the effects of statin on tumour angiogenesis and a potential target therapy in HCC.
    Gastroenterology Research and Practice 01/2010; 2010:640797. · 1.62 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Angiotensinogen, a member of the serpin family, is involved in the suppression of tumor growth and metastasis. To investigate whether human angiotensinogen protects against tumor progression in vivo, we established an original bitransgenic model in which transgenic mice expressing human angiotensinogen (Hu-AGT-TG mice) were crossed with a transgenic mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC-TG mice). Bitransgenic mice overexpressing human angiotensinogen (HCC/Hu-AGT-TG) had a significantly longer survival time than the HCC-TG mice and a reduction of both tumor growth and blood flow velocities in the liver. This antitumor effect of angiotensinogen is related to a reduced angiogenesis, impaired expression of endothelial arterial markers (active Notch4, Delta-like 4 ligand, and ephrin B2) with a decrease of arterial vessel density in HCC/Hu-AGT-TG mice liver. Overexpression of human angiotensinogen decreases angiogenesis, and prevents tumor sinusoids from remodeling and arterialization, thus delaying tumor progression in vivo.
    Cancer Research 05/2009; 69(7):2853-60. · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Delta-like 4 ligand (DLL4) are the only genes whose haploinsufficiency results in vascular abnormalities. Although many common pathways are up-regulated in both vascular development and tumor angiogenesis and in vascular remodeling, the role of the Delta/Notch pathway has not been clearly defined in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we assessed the expression of DLL4, Notch4, and ephrin B2 in transgenic mice developing hepatocarcinoma characterized by a strong remodeling of the tumor sinusoids. We also investigated the role of VEGF in the expression and biological functions of these molecules on human venous endothelial cells. In transgenic livers, we showed that DLL4, active Notch4, and ephrin B2 were gradually up-regulated within the hepatocarcinoma progression and expressed on tumor sinusoidal endothelial cells. In venous endothelial cells, we showed that VEGF up-regulates DLL4 and presenilin, and increased the activation of Notch4, leading to an up-regulation of ephrin B2 with a down-regulation of Eph B4. We also showed that the activation of Notch4 is required for VEGF-induced up-regulation of ephrin B2 and the differentiation of human venous endothelial cells in vitro. Accordingly, the disruption of Notch4 signaling by pharmacologic inhibition of presenilin or addition of soluble DLL4 inhibited the effect of VEGF on human venous endothelial cell migration and differentiation. Our study strongly suggests that a coordinated activation of DDL4/Notch4 and ephrin B2 pathways downstream of VEGF plays a key role in the abnormal remodeling of tumor vessels.
    Cancer Research 10/2006; 66(17):8501-10. · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The mechanism by which the CXC chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF-4) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation is unclear. The heparin-binding domains of PF-4 have been reported to prevent vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) from interacting with their receptors. However, other studies have suggested that PF-4 acts via heparin-binding independent interactions. Here, we compared the effects of PF-4 on the signalling events involved in the proliferation induced by VEGF(165), which binds heparin, and by VEGF(121), which does not. Activation of the VEGF receptor, KDR, and phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma) was unaffected in conditions in which PF-4 inhibited VEGF(121)-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast, VEGF(165)-induced phosphorylation of KDR and PLCgamma was partially inhibited by PF-4. These observations are consistent with PF-4 affecting the binding of VEGF(165), but not that of VEGF(121), to KDR. PF-4 also strongly inhibited the VEGF(165)- and VEGF(121)-induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathways comprising Raf1, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2: for VEGF(165) it interacts directly or upstream from Raf1; for VEGF(121), it acts downstream from PLCgamma. Finally, the mechanism by which PF-4 may inhibit the endothelial cell proliferation induced by both VEGF(121) and VEGF(165), involving disruption of the MAP kinase signalling pathway downstream from KDR did not seem to involve CXCR3B activation.
    European Journal of Biochemistry 09/2004; 271(16):3310-8. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that postnatal neovascularization does not rely exclusively on sprouting of preexisting vessels, but also involves bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial precursors (BM-EPCs). Animal studies revealed that neovascularization of ischemic tissue can be enhanced by BM-EPCs transplantation. But a possible limitation to the use of vascular precursors for therapeutic angiogenesis is the relatively low number of these cells. In this study, we demonstrate that ex vivo expanded differentiated endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), may home to the tumor vasculature allowing targeting of transgene expression to the neoangiogenic site. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) or CD34+ -enriched cells were purified from cord blood. We have defined culture conditions in which we observed two types of clones easily differentiated according to their morphology: cobblestone or spindle-shaped. Phenotypic characterization was assessed by immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry analysis and polymerase reaction with reverse transcription. Formation of capillary-like network in vitro was studied in three-dimensional collagen culture. And recruitment of these cells to a tumoral neoangiogenic site was assessed into tumor-bearing Severe Combined Immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The cobblestone cells uniformly positive for CD31, VE-cadherin, vWF, VEGF R1 and R2, ecNOS and incorporating acetylated LDL were ECs. Spindle-shaped cells expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), Smooth Muscle Heavy Chain (SMHC), SM22 and calponin. They also displayed a carbachol-induced contractility in a medium containing IGF1. So we concluded that spindle-shaped cells were SMCs. ECs and SMCs interacted with each other to form a capillary like network in three-dimensional type I collagen culture. Moreover, these ex vivo differentiated cells are able to home to the tumor vasculature. We provide evidence that progenitors for ECs and SMCs circulate in human cord blood and differentiate into functional ECs and SMCs. These differentiated cells could provide a biomaterial for vascular cell therapy, because of their homing capacity to the neovascularization site.
    Cardiovascular Research 05/2004; 62(1):176-84. · 5.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Platelet factor 4 (PF-4) is a member of the chemokine family with powerful antiangiogenic properties. The mechanism by which PF-4 inhibits endothelial cell proliferation is unclear. We investigated the effects of PF-4 on the intracellular signal transduction induced by basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2). We found that PF-4 (10 microg/mL) inhibited the FGF2-induced proliferation of adrenal cortex capillary endothelial (ACE) cells. The inhibition of MEK1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) by PD98059 or of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase) by Ly294002 abolished the proliferation induced by FGF2, suggesting that ACE cell proliferation required dual signaling through both the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and PI3K pathways. Ly294002 had no significant effect on ERK phosphorylation, whereas PD98059 had a weak effect on the phosphorylation of Akt, suggesting that 2 separate cascades are required for ACE cell proliferation. The addition of PF-4 (10 microg/mL) significantly inhibited ERK phosphorylation (95%), showing that PF-4 acted directly on or upstream from this kinase. Surprisingly, PF-4 did not affect FGF2-induced Akt phosphorylation. This suggests that PF-4 disrupts FGF2 signaling via an intracellular mechanism of inhibition. To exclude the possibility that PF-4 inhibited the binding of FGF2 to only one FGF receptor, preferentially activating the ERK pathway, we investigated the effect of PF-4 on FGF2-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, using mutant heparan sulfate-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the FGF-R1 cDNA. The addition of PF-4 (1 microg/mL) significantly inhibited ERK phosphorylation (90%), with no effect on Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PF-4 acts downstream from the FGF-R1 receptor. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that PF-4 inhibits FGF2 activity downstream from its receptor.
    Blood 12/2002; 100(9):3087-94. · 9.78 Impact Factor