Marco Tulio Méndez-López

Mexican Institute of Social Security, Ciudad de México, The Federal District, Mexico

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Publications (15)20.45 Total impact

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    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 07/2014; 34(4):531-534. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Jehovah's Witness refuse blood transfusion, but they accept organ transplantation, albumin, immunoglobulin, vaccines and clotting factors.
    Cirugia y cirujanos 09/2013; 81(5):450-3. · 0.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term graft function and survival are of particular importance in children assuming that they have a longer transplantation life span than most adults. Because acute rejection episodes (ARE) continue to have a serious impact on graft loss, we analyzed the effects of ARE on 5-year survival and function in our population. Fifty-seven living donor kidney transplant recipients (34 males) younger than 18 years of age (13.5 ± 2.6 years; range, 5-17) were follow up for at feast 12 months using cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid therapy with or without induction treatment between February 2003 and December 2010. ARE incidence during the first 12 months following transplantation was 14%. One-, 3- and 5-year serum creatinine values were 1.24 ± 0.39, 2.16 ± 2.39, and 1.76 ± 0.9 mg/dL, respectively. Mean calculated creatinine clearances (Schwartz) at 1, 3, and 5 years were 82.5 ± 24.8, 64.7 ± 24.1, and 67 ± 27.5 mL/min*1.73 m(2), respectively. Patient/graft survival rates were 96/85%, 90/72%, and 88/65% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Patients who experienced an ARE within 12 months following transplantation displayed a reduced 5-year graft survival rate (37.5%) versus those who did not (78%; P = .005). Patients who did not have an ARE during 60 months had a higher graft survival rate (76%) than those who had ARE (33%; P = .001). Patient without basiliximab induction showed a lower 5-year graft survival rate (61% vs 100%; P = not significant [NS]). ARE is an important risk factor for graft loss in the pediatric kidney transplant population.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2013; 45(4):1442-1444. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    Revista de gastroenterologia de Mexico 02/2013;
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    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 11/2012; 32(6):843-845. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Catheter-related complications in patients on peritoneal dialysis lead to decreased effectiveness and discontinuation of the technique, conversion to haemodialysis, hospitalisation, and surgical interventions to replace the catheter. Determine risk factors for early catheter dysfunction that result in the need for replacement. We analysed 235 catheters placed by open surgery using an infra-umbilical midline incision. Possible risk factors included the following: age, sex, body mass index, body surface area, diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, previous surgery, time of surgical procedure, omentectomy, omentopexy, wound infection and postoperative incisional hernia. During the first year, 47 patients (20%) required a catheter replacement due to poor function. The most common complications were catheter migration and peritonitis (4.3% in both cases), followed by obstruction from omental wrapping (3.7%). Univariate analysis showed that patients with catheter dysfunction or requiring catheter replacement were younger, with a lower body mass index and body surface area (P<.05). There was a significant association of wound infection and post-operative incisional hernia with catheter replacement. Omentectomy was associated with a low incidence rate of catheter dysfunction/replacement in the univariate and logistical regression analyses (odds ratio: 0.275; 95% confidence interval: 0.101-0.751; P<.012). Our catheter placement technique offers a low complication rate and good results in the first year after surgery. Except for omentectomy, we did not discover any risk factors for catheter replacement in our study population. Omentectomy had a protective effect in terms of catheter replacement.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 05/2012; 32(3):353-8. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To describe our surgical experience with patients undergoing dialysis, addressing the identification of perioperative (30 days) risk factors for morbidity and mortality.
    Cirujano general. 12/2011; 33(4):227-231.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Catheter-related complications in patients on peritoneal dialysis lead to decreased effectiveness and discontinuation of the technique, conversion to haemodialysis, hospitalisation, and surgical interventions to replace the catheter. Objectives: Determine risk factors for early catheter dysfunction that result in the need for replacement. Methods: We analysed 235 catheters placed by open surgery using an infra-umbilical midline incision. Possible risk factors included the following: age, sex, body mass index, body surface area, diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, previous surgery, time of surgical procedure, omentectomy, omentopexy, wound infection and postoperative incisional hernia. Results: During the first year, 47 patients (20%) required a catheter replacement due to poor function. The most common complications were catheter migration and peritonitis (4.3% in both cases), followed by obstruction from omental wrapping (3.7%). Univariate analysis showed that patients with catheter dysfunction or requiring catheter replacement were younger, with a lower body mass index and body surface area (P<.05). There was a significant association of wound infection and post-operative incisional hernia with catheter replacement. Omentectomy was associated with a low incidence rate of catheter dysfunction/replacement in the univariate and logistical regression analyses (odds ratio: 0.275; 95% confidence interval: 0.101-0.751; P<.012). Conclusions: Our catheter placement technique offers a low complication rate and good results in the first year after surgery. Except for omentectomy, we did not discover any risk factors for catheter replacement in our study population. Omentectomy had a protective effect in terms of catheter replacement.
    Nefrologia: publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia 12/2011; 32(3):353-358. · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation 01/2010; 90. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT:   Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) toxicity is one of the contributing factors for the development and progression of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD). Conversion to sirolimus (SRL) from CNI improves renal function kidney in transplant recipients. A retrospective review from patients abruptly converted from CNI to SRL over a three yr period is reported. Thirty-nine patients were converted 55.2±58 months after renal transplantation. 24 month patient and graft survival was 100% and 92%. Acute rejection incidence was 7.6%. Overall, serum creatinine (SCr) and Cockcroft-Gault creatinine clearance (CGCrCl) improved. In responders, SCr improved from 2.48±0.8 to 1.94±0.8 mg/dL (p<0.05) CGCrCl improved from 37.8±17.4 to 51.9±23.8 mL/min at two years. An increase in proteinuria was observed from conversion to month 12 in responders (189.4±512.8 to 488.3±890.6 mg/day, p<0.05) and from conversion to month six in non-responders (1179.4±2001.1 to 2357±4172.9 mg/day, p<0.05). Low proteinuria had positive predictive value for renal response after conversion. Conversion from CNI to SRL with CAD is associated with improved renal function with an increase in proteinuria. Low proteinuria is a possible positive predictive factor for successful conversion.
    Clinical Transplantation 09/2009; 24(4):467-73. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An MMF-based immunosuppression has reduced the acute rejection rate in adults and in children in the early post-transplantation period. In the present study, pediatric renal transplantation patients on a CyA, MMF, and steroids regimen were prospectively evaluated. Patients with CyA, MMF, and steroid therapy without antibody induction were evaluated for surgical aspects, renal function, rejection, and survival, growth after transplantation, adverse events and medication discontinuation. Between February 2003 and May 2005, 21 kidney transplantation patients under 18 yr old were followed for at least 12 months. Within one year after transplantation, three patients developed four episodes of acute rejection (19%). Graft loss because of rejection occurred in one patient. One-year mean serum creatinine was 1.19 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Mean calculated CrCl by Schwartz formula was 82.3 +/- 19.7 mL/min*1.73 m(2). Major adverse events included infections of the urinary tract and diarrhea, abdominal pain, and GI symptoms. No patients have discontinued the use of MMF. Good results in pediatric kidney transplantation can be achieved by using CyA/MMF/steroids. MMF is effective and relatively safe in reducing the incidence of acute rejection even without induction therapy 12 months after transplantation.
    Pediatric Transplantation 04/2007; 11(2):134-8. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We performed a prospective randomized trial comparing sirolimus/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/prednisone to cyclosporine/MMF/prednisone and selected induction therapy with basiliximab. Twenty patients received sirolimus (10 mg loading dose followed by 3 mg/m body surface area/day, keeping 24-hr trough levels at 10-15 ng/mL for six months and 5-10 ng/mL thereafter. Twenty-one patients began cyclosporine (4 to 8 mg/kg/day, keeping 12-hour trough levels at 150-300 ng/mL for 6 months and 100-200 ng/mL afterwards). Mean follow up was 15.8 months. One-year patient and graft survival was similar in both groups (>90%). Acute rejection rate was 16.6% in the sirolimus group and 5.2% in the cyclosporine group (P=NS). There were no differences in mean serum creatinine between groups. No patients who received basiliximab and had sirolimus target levels suffered acute rejection at one year. The sirolimus group had significantly higher cholesterol and triglycerides. A calcineurin inhibitor-free regimen using sirolimus produces comparable one-year transplant outcomes in living related kidney transplants compared to a calcineurin inhibitor regimen.
    Transplantation 01/2007; 82(11):1533-6. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Calcineurin inhibitors play an important role in chronic allograft dysfunction. Sirolimus is an interesting alternative in renal transplant patients because it is less nephrotoxic than calcineurin inhibitors. A chart review of the clinical outcome of kidney transplant patients converted to sirolimus with progressive allograft dysfunction is reported herein. Fifteen patients (average age: 32.3 years, 44 months mean time of conversion) were included. Indication for conversion was a >20% increase in serum creatinine over the last 6 months or progression to the range of 2-4.5 mg/dL. Patients underwent abrupt cessation of cyclosporine and sirolimus addition at 2-5 mg/day. Concomitant immunosuppression remained unchanged during conversion. Targeted sirolimus level was 8-12 ng/mL. Serum creatinine dropped from pre-conversion level of 2.75 +/- 0.83 to 2.14 +/- 0.67 and 1.97 +/- 0.66 mg/dL at 3 and 6 months (p <0.05). There was a significant decrease in blood urea nitrogen, hemoglobin and serum calcium at 3 months post-conversion as well as serum calcium and potassium at 6 months post-conversion (p <0.05). There were no rejection episodes. Patient and graft survival was 100% with three infectious complications. Monitored sirolimus conversion with sharp withdrawal of calcineurin inhibitor is an alternative for patients with deteriorating renal function and chronic allograft nephropathy.
    Archives of Medical Research 07/2006; 37(5):635-8. · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Resumen La literatura cuenta con pocos casos de traumatismo sobre un riñón trasplantado con preservación de la función renal. Se infor- ma de un hombre de 35 años de edad, receptor de trasplante renal de donador vivo relacionado, que 184 meses postrasplante recibió un golpe en la fosa iliaca derecha mientras trabajaba con un torno en movimiento. El paciente se presentó a nuestro servi- cio hemodinámicamente estable, con dolor en fosa iliaca dere- cha, disuria y hematuria macroscópica. La tomografía axial computarizada no contrastada reveló hematoma subcapsular y perrirenal con compresión renal. Debido a la anemia y a la dismi- nución de la función renal, el paciente fue sometido a cirugía, con la que se encontró hematoma perirrenal a tensión de 500 ml comprimiendo al riñón y uréter, laceración del polo superior de 5 mm de profundidad y 5 mm de longitud, laceración en la cara medial polo superior, ambas con sangrado activo sin lesión en hilio renal. Las lesiones fueron reparadas con material absorbible sobre material hemostático. Durante el seguimiento, el paciente se mantenía con un nivel de creatinina sérica de 1.5 mg/dl. Palabras clave: trasplante renal, trauma contuso. Summary A 35-year-old male received a living related kidney transplant. At 184 months posttransplantation he suffered a direct right iliac fossa blunt trauma while working on a machine in a steel factory. Graft pain, dysuria and gross hematuria were observed and CT showed a periallograft hematoma. Because of his anemia and graft function deterioration, surgical exploration was warranted. A 500-ml perigraft hematoma was compressing the kidney and ureter, a 5-cm long, 5-mm in depth linear laceration in the lateral aspect of the superior pole of the graft and a 15-mm long, 2-mm in depth linear laceration in the medial aspect of the superior pole were actively bleeding. Major renal arteries and veins were not injured. Both lacerations were closed by suturing the renal parenchyma over gelfoam pledgets with absorbable suture in a buttress fashion. The kidney was salvaged. Serum creatinine was maintained at 1.5 mg/dl during follow-up. A review of the literature showed that few cases of traumatic renal graft rupture with kidney salvage have been reported. Our case is one of them.
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    ABSTRACT: A 35-year-old male received a living related kidney transplant. At 184 months posttransplantation he suffered a direct right iliac fossa blunt trauma while working on a machine in a steel factory. Graft pain, dysuria and gross hematuria were observed and CT showed a periallograft hematoma. Because of his anemia and graft function deterioration, surgical exploration was warranted. A 500-cc perigraft hematoma was compressing the kidney and ureter, a 5-cm long, 5-mm in depth linear laceration in the lateral aspect of the superior pole of the graft and a 15-mm long, 2-mm in depth linear laceration in the medial aspect of the superior pole were actively bleeding. Major renal arteries and veins were not injured. Both lacerations were closed by suturing the renal parenchyma over gelfoam pledgets with absorbable suture in a buttress fashion. The kidney was salvaged. Serum creatinine was maintained at 1.5 mg/dl during follow-up. A review of the literature showed that few cases of traumatic renal graft rupture with kidney salvage have been reported. Our case is one of them.
    Cirugia y cirujanos 74(3):205-8. · 0.32 Impact Factor