Sally J. Peterson-Falzone

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States

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Publications (5)3.59 Total impact

  • Sally J. Peterson-Falzone ·
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    ABSTRACT: Responsible clinicians strive toward optimal outcome in every aspect of the life of a child with a cleft – facial appearance, occlusion, speech, social and emotional development, and educational and occupational achievement. Multiple studies have shown that normal speech development requires that a fully functional velopharyngeal system be provided for the child with a cleft by the time of the development of the first meaningful words. The body of evidence speaking to this point has continued to grow since the publication of the second edition of this book. It appears that the best hope for an answer to the age-old dilemma of speech versus facial growth lies in continuing modification of treatment regimens, especially those involving primary veloplasty.
    Cleft Lip and Palate, 01/2013: pages 787-802; , ISBN: 978-3-642-30769-0
  • Sally Peterson-Falzone ·
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract (Not applicable).
    The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal 05/2012; DOI:10.1597/12-037 · 1.20 Impact Factor
  • Sally J. Peterson-Falzone · Mahin Golabi · Anil K. Lalwani ·
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    ABSTRACT: A review of clinical findings in 12 children with Kabuki syndrome revealed a high prevalence of otolaryngologic problems, including dysmorphic pinnae (100%), ear disease (92%), hearing loss (82%) and airway problems (58%). The high prevalence of ear disease and hearing loss was not explained solely on the basis of prevalence of cleft palate. Patients with Kabuki syndrome require the diagnostic and treatment expertise of otolaryngologists on an ongoing basis. Copyright (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.
    International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology 02/1997; 38(3):227-36. DOI:10.1016/S0165-5876(96)01443-7 · 1.19 Impact Factor
  • Sally J. Peterson-Falzone ·
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    ABSTRACT: The optimum age for surgical closure of cleft palate remains an unresolved question, despite the fact that many clinicians have studied the issue since the 1930s. This article reviews the debate as it has taken shape over the last several decades, with a prospective view toward how standards of practice may evolve in the foreseeable future.
    Seminars in Orthodontics 10/1996; 2(3):185-91. DOI:10.1016/S1073-8746(96)80013-2
  • Sally J. Peterson-Falzone ·
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    ABSTRACT: Speech results were surveyed in 110 adolescent patients with clefts: 53 with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 46 with bilateral cleft lip and palate, and 11 with isolated clefts of the secondary palate. Only 12 of the 110 teenagers had received consistent team care from infancy. The early physical management was impossible to reliably determine in the remaining 98. Speech was normal in 22.7%, characterized by a variety of problems in approximately 66%, and a complete habilitative failure in 10.9%. Cleft palate and craniofacial teams who first encounter incompletely managed cases in the teenage years are faced with complex and interrelated challenges of providing appropriate physical management, speech habilitation, and psychosocial support, including determination of that approach which will be most likely to assure future compliance with treatment recommendations to each child and family.
    The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal 04/1995; 32(2):125-8. DOI:10.1597/1545-1569(1995)032<0125:SOIAWC>2.3.CO;2 · 1.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

54 Citations
3.59 Total Impact Points


  • 1995-1997
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Division of Craniofacial Anomalies
      San Francisco, California, United States