Nicholas Katsanis

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States

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Publications (226)2988.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The first critical stage in salamander or teleost appendage regeneration is creation of a specialized epidermis that instructs growth from underlying stump tissue. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutations that impair this process in amputated zebrafish fins. Positional cloning and complementation assays identified a temperature-sensitive allele of the ECM component laminin beta 1a (lamb1a) that blocks fin regeneration. lamb1a, but not its paralog lamb1b, is sharply induced in a subset of epithelial cells after fin amputation, where it is required to establish and maintain a polarized basal epithelial cell layer. These events facilitate expression of the morphogenetic factors shha and lef1, basolateral positioning of phosphorylated Igf1r, patterning of new osteoblasts, and regeneration of bone. By contrast, lamb1a function is dispensable for juvenile body growth, homeostatic adult tissue maintenance, repair of split fins, or renewal of genetically ablated osteoblasts. fgf20a mutations or transgenic Fgf receptor inhibition disrupt lamb1a expression, linking a central growth factor to epithelial maturation during regeneration. Our findings reveal transient induction of lamb1a in epithelial cells as a key, growth factor-guided step in formation of a signaling-competent regeneration epidermis.
    PLoS Genetics 08/2015; 11(8):e1005437. DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005437 · 8.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The genetic disorder Kabuki syndrome (KS) is characterized by developmental delay and congenital anomalies. Dominant mutations in the chromatin regulators lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D) (also known as MLL2) and lysine (K)-specific demethylase 6A (KDM6A) underlie the majority of cases. Although the functions of these chromatin-modifying proteins have been studied extensively, the physiological systems regulated by them are largely unknown. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in RAP1A that was converted to homozygosity as the result of uniparental isodisomy (UPD) in a patient with KS and a de novo, dominant mutation in RAP1B in a second individual with a KS-like phenotype. We elucidated a genetic and functional interaction between the respective KS-associated genes and their products in zebrafish models and patient cell lines. Specifically, we determined that dysfunction of known KS genes and the genes identified in this study results in aberrant MEK/ERK signaling as well as disruption of F-actin polymerization and cell intercalation. Moreover, these phenotypes could be rescued in zebrafish models by rebalancing MEK/ERK signaling via administration of small molecule inhibitors of MEK. Taken together, our studies suggest that the KS pathophysiology overlaps with the RASopathies and provide a potential direction for treatment design.
    The Journal of clinical investigation 08/2015; DOI:10.1172/JCI80102 · 13.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intellectual disability (ID) affects approximately 1%–3% of humans with a gender bias toward males. Previous studies have identified mutations in more than 100 genes on the X chromosome in males with ID, but there is less evidence for de novo mutations on the X chromosome causing ID in females. In this study we present 35 unique deleterious de novo mutations in DDX3X identified by Whole exome sequencing in 38 females with ID and various other features including hypotonia, movement disorders, behavior problems,corpus callosum hypoplasia, and epilepsy. Based on our findings, mutations in DDX3X are one of the more common causes of ID, accounting for 1%–3% of unexplained ID in females. Although no de novo DDX3X mutations were identified in males, we present three families with segregating missense mutations in DDX3X, suggestive of an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. In these families, all males with the DDX3X variant had ID, whereas carrier females were unaffected. To explore the pathogenic mechanisms Accounting for the differences in disease transmission and phenotype between affected females and affected males with DDX3X missense variants, we used canonical Wnt defects in zebrafish as a surrogate measure of DDX3X function in vivo.We demonstrate a consistent loss-of-function effect of all tested de novo mutations on the Wnt pathway, and we further show a differential effect by gender. The differential activity possibly reflects a dose-dependent effect of DDX3X expression in the context of functional mosaic females versus one-copy males, which reflects the complex biological nature of DDX3X mutations.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 08/2015; 97(2):343-352. DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.07.004. · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous distal symmetric polyneuropathy. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 40 individuals from 37 unrelated families with CMT-like peripheral neuropathy refractory to molecular diagnosis identified apparent causal mutations in ∼45% (17/37) of families. Three candidate disease genes are proposed, supported by a combination of genetic and in vivo studies. Aggregate analysis of mutation data revealed a significantly increased number of rare variants across 58 neuropathy-associated genes in subjects versus controls, confirmed in a second ethnically discrete neuropathy cohort, suggesting that mutation burden potentially contributes to phenotypic variability. Neuropathy genes shown to have highly penetrant Mendelizing variants (HPMVs) and implicated by burden in families were shown to interact genetically in a zebrafish assay exacerbating the phenotype established by the suppression of single genes. Our findings suggest that the combinatorial effect of rare variants contributes to disease burden and variable expressivity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Cell Reports 08/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.celrep.2015.07.023 · 8.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Essential tremor (ET) is a common movement disorder with an estimated prevalence of 5% of the population aged over 65 years. In spite of intensive efforts, the genetic architecture of ET remains unknown. We used a combination of whole exome sequencing and targeted resequencing in three ET families. In vitro and in vivo experiments in oligodendrocyte precursor cells and zebrafish were performed to test our findings. Whole exome sequencing revealed a missense mutation in TENM4 segregating in an autosomal dominant fashion in an ET family. Subsequent targeted resequencing of TENM4 led to the discovery of two novel missense mutations. Not only did these two mutations segregate with ET in two additional families, but we also observed significant over transmission of pathogenic TENM4 alleles across the three families. Consistent with a dominant mode of inheritance, in vitro analysis in oligodendrocyte precursor cells showed that mutant proteins mislocalize. Finally, expression of human mRNA harboring any of three patient mutations in zebrafish embryos induced defects in axon guidance, confirming a dominant-negative mode of action for these mutations. Our genetic and functional data, which is corroborated by the existence of a Tenm4 knock-out mouse displaying an essential tremor phenotype, implicates TENM4 in ET. Together with previous studies of TENM4 in model organisms, our studies intimate that processes regulating myelination in the central nervous system and axon guidance might be significant contributors to the genetic burden of this disorder. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Human Molecular Genetics 07/2015; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv281 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: African Americans have a disproportionate risk for developing nephropathy. This disparity has been attributed to coding variants (G1 and G2) in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1); however, there is little functional evidence supporting the role of this protein in renal function. Here, we combined genetics and in vivo modeling to examine the role of apol1 in glomerular development and pronephric filtration and to test the pathogenic potential of APOL1 G1 and G2. Translational suppression or CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of apol1 in zebrafish embryos results in podocyte loss and glomerular filtration defects. Complementation of apol1 morphants with wild-type human APOL1 mRNA rescues these defects. However, the APOL1 G1 risk allele does not ameliorate defects caused by apol1 suppression and the pathogenicity is conferred by the cis effect of both individual variants of the G1 risk haplotype (I384M/S342G). In vivo complementation studies of the G2 risk allele also indicate that the variant is deleterious to protein function. Moreover, APOL1 G2, but not G1, expression alone promotes developmental kidney defects, suggesting a possible dominant-negative effect of the altered protein. In sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, we reported previously a genetic interaction between APOL1 and MYH9. Testing this interaction in vivo by co-suppressing both transcripts yielded no additive effects. However, upon genetic or chemical induction of anemia, we observed a significantly exacerbated nephropathy phenotype. Furthermore, concordant with the genetic interaction observed in SCD patients, APOL1 G2 reduces myh9 expression in vivo, suggesting a possible interaction between the altered APOL1 and myh9. Our data indicate a critical role for APOL1 in renal function that is compromised by nephropathy-risk encoding variants. Moreover, our interaction studies indicate that the MYH9 locus is also relevant to the phenotype in a stressed microenvironment and suggest that consideration of the context-dependent functions of both proteins will be required to develop therapeutic paradigms.
    PLoS Genetics 07/2015; 11(7):e1005349. DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005349 · 8.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the expansion of CTG18.1 allele associated with Fuchs' corneal dystrophy (FCD) in our large cohort of late-onset FCD cases. CTG repeats within the CTG18.1 allele were estimated by short tandem repeat (STR) and triplet primed PCR (TP-PCR) assays in our large cohort of 574 late-onset FCD cases and 354 controls and large multigeneration familial cases. The age versus severity relationships were analyzed in FCD genotypes, namely, nonexpanded (N/N), monoallelic expansion (N/X), and biallelic expansion (X/X) with N ≤ 40 CTG monomers. The threshold for causality conferred by an expansion of CTG18.1 was identified by excluding the population of FCD cases who harbored an allele length equivalent to the maximum CTG monomers observed in the controls. The expanded CTG18.1 for (CTG)n>40 showed a strong association (P = 1.56 × 10-82) with FCD. Importantly, we delineated the threshold of expansion to 103 CTG repeats above which the allele confers causality in 17.8% of FCD cases. Regression analyses demonstrated a significant correlation between disease severity and age in individuals who harbor either a monoallelic expansion or a biallelic expansion at (CTG)n>40. These analyses helped predict FCD in two previously unaffected individuals based on their CTG18.1 expansion genotype. A monoallelic expansion of CTG18.1 contributes to increased disease severity and is causal at (CTG)n>103, whereas a biallelic expansion is sufficient to be causal for FCD at (CTG)n>40. This study highlights the largest contributory causal allele for FCD.
    Investigative ophthalmology & visual science 07/2015; 56(8):4531-4536. DOI:10.1167/iovs.14-16122 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patterns of amino acid conservation have served as a tool for understanding protein evolution. The same principles have also found broad application in human genomics, driven by the need to interpret the pathogenic potential of variants in patients. Here we performed a systematic comparative genomics analysis of human disease-causing missense variants. We found that an appreciable fraction of disease-causing alleles are fixed in the genomes of other species, suggesting a role for genomic context. We developed a model of genetic interactions that predicts most of these to be simple pairwise compensations. Functional testing of this model on two known human disease genes revealed discrete cis amino acid residues that, although benign on their own, could rescue the human mutations in vivo. This approach was also applied to ab initio gene discovery to support the identification of a de novo disease driver in BTG2 that is subject to protective cis-modification in more than 50 species. Finally, on the basis of our data and models, we developed a computational tool to predict candidate residues subject to compensation. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of cis-genomic context as a contributor to protein evolution; they provide an insight into the complexity of allele effect on phenotype; and they are likely to assist methods for predicting allele pathogenicity.
    Nature 06/2015; DOI:10.1038/nature14497 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: -Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an autosomal dominant, genetically heterogeneous cardiomyopathy with variable severity, which may co-occur with cardiac hypertrophy. -Here, we generated whole exome sequence (WES) data from multiple members from five families with LVNC. In four out of five families, the candidate causative mutation segregates with disease in known LVNC genes MYH7 and TPM1. Subsequent sequencing of MYH7 in a larger LVNC cohort identified seven novel likely disease causing variants. In the fifth family, we identified a frameshift mutation in NNT, a nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein, not implicated previously in human cardiomyopathies. Resequencing of NNT in additional LVNC families identified a second likely pathogenic missense allele. Suppression of nnt in zebrafish caused early ventricular malformation and contractility defects, likely driven by altered cardiomyocyte proliferation. In vivo complementation studies showed that mutant human NNT failed to rescue nnt morpholino-induced heart dysfunction, indicating a probable haploinsufficiency mechanism. -Together, our data expand the genetic spectrum of LVNC and demonstrate how the intersection of WES with in vivo functional studies can accelerate the identification of genes that drive human genetic disorders.
    Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics 05/2015; DOI:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.115.001026 · 5.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 05/2015; 96(6). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.04.010 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood represent attractive sources of cells for reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, to date, most of the blood-derived iPSCs were generated using either integrating methods or starting from T-lymphocytes that have genomic rearrangements thus bearing uncertain consequences when using iPSC-derived lineages for disease modeling and cell therapies. Recently, both peripheral blood and cord blood cells have been reprogrammed into transgene-free iPSC using the Sendai viral vector. Here we demonstrate that peripheral blood can be utilized for medium-throughput iPSC production without the need to maintain cell culture prior to reprogramming induction. Cell reprogramming can also be accomplished with as little as 3000 previously cryopreserved cord blood cells under feeder-free and chemically defined Xeno-free conditions that are compliant with standard Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) regulations. The first iPSC colonies appear 2-3 weeks faster in comparison to previous reports. Notably, these peripheral blood- and cord blood-derived iPSCs are free of detectable immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements, suggesting they did not originate from B- or T- lymphoid cells. The iPSCs are pluripotent as evaluated by the scorecard assay and in vitro multi lineage functional cell differentiation. Our data show that small volumes of cryopreserved peripheral blood or cord blood cells can be reprogrammed efficiently at a convenient, cost effective and scalable way. In summary, our method expands the reprogramming potential of limited or archived samples either stored at blood banks or obtained from pediatric populations that cannot easily provide large quantities of peripheral blood or a skin biopsy.
    Stem cell reviews 05/2015; 11(4). DOI:10.1007/s12015-015-9586-8 · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cerebral cortex is built during embryonic neurogenesis, a period when excitatory neurons are generated from progenitors. Defects in neurogenesis can cause acute neurodevelopmental disorders, such as microcephaly (reduced brain size). Altered dosage of the 1q21.1 locus has been implicated in the etiology of neurodevelopmental phenotypes; however, the role of 1q21.1 genes in neurogenesis has remained elusive. Here, we show that haploinsufficiency for Rbm8a, an exon junction complex (EJC) component within 1q21.1, causes severe microcephaly and defective neurogenesis in the mouse. At the onset of neurogenesis, Rbm8a regulates radial glia proliferation and prevents premature neuronal differentiation. Reduced Rbm8a levels result in subsequent apoptosis of neurons, and to a lesser extent, radial glia. Hence, compared to control, Rbm8a-haploinsufficient brains have fewer progenitors and neurons, resulting in defective cortical lamination. To determine whether reciprocal dosage change of Rbm8a alters embryonic neurogenesis, we overexpressed human RBM8A in two animal models. Using in utero electroporation of mouse neocortices as well as zebrafish models, we find RBM8A overexpression does not significantly perturb progenitor number or head size. Our findings demonstrate that Rbm8a is an essential neurogenesis regulator, and add to a growing literature highlighting roles for EJC components in cortical development and neurodevelopmental pathology. Our results indicate that disruption of RBM8A may contribute to neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with proximal 1q21.1 microdeletions. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357003-16$15.00/0.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 05/2015; 35(18):7003-7018. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0018-15.2015 · 6.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 16p11.2 600 kb copy-number variants (CNVs) are associated with mirror phenotypes on BMI, head circumference, and brain volume and represent frequent genetic lesions in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia. Here we interrogated the transcriptome of individuals carrying reciprocal 16p11.2 CNVs. Transcript perturbations correlated with clinical endophenotypes and were enriched for genes associated with ASDs, abnormalities of head size, and ciliopathies. Ciliary gene expression was also perturbed in orthologous mouse models, raising the possibility that ciliary dysfunction contributes to 16p11.2 pathologies. In support of this hypothesis, we found structural ciliary defects in the CA1 hippocampal region of 16p11.2 duplication mice. Moreover, by using an established zebrafish model, we show genetic interaction between KCTD13, a key driver of the mirrored neuroanatomical phenotypes of the 16p11.2 CNV, and ciliopathy-associated genes. Overexpression of BBS7 rescues head size and neuroanatomical defects of kctd13 morphants, whereas suppression or overexpression of CEP290 rescues phenotypes induced by KCTD13 under- or overexpression, respectively. Our data suggest that dysregulation of ciliopathy genes contributes to the clinical phenotypes of these CNVs. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 04/2015; 96(5). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.04.002 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex functions at the transition zone, located between the basal body and axoneme, to regulate the localization of ciliary membrane proteins. We investigated the role of Tmem231, a two-pass transmembrane protein, in MKS complex formation and function. Consistent with a role in transition zone function, mutation of mouse Tmem231 disrupts the localization of proteins including Arl13b and Inpp5e to cilia, resulting in phenotypes characteristic of MKS such as polydactyly and kidney cysts. Tmem231 and B9d1 are essential for each other and other complex components such as Mks1 to localize to the transition zone. As in mouse, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of Tmem231 localizes to and controls transition zone formation and function, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for Tmem231. We identified TMEM231 mutations in orofaciodigital syndrome type 3 (OFD3) and MKS patients that compromise transition zone function. Thus, Tmem231 is critical for organizing the MKS complex and controlling ciliary composition, defects in which cause OFD3 and MKS. © 2015 Roberson et al.
    The Journal of Cell Biology 04/2015; 209(1):129-142. DOI:10.1083/jcb.201411087 · 9.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 04/2015; 96(5). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.03.001 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism is a multifactorial neurodevelopmental disorder affecting more males than females; consequently, under a multifactorial genetic hypothesis, females are affected only when they cross a higher biological threshold. We hypothesize that deleterious variants at conserved residues are enriched in severely affected patients arising from female-enriched multiplex families with severe disease, enhancing the detection of key autism genes in modest numbers of cases. Here we show the use of this strategy by identifying missense and dosage sequence variants in the gene encoding the adhesive junction-associated δ-catenin protein (CTNND2) in female-enriched multiplex families and demonstrating their loss-of-function effect by functional analyses in zebrafish embryos and cultured hippocampal neurons from wild-type and Ctnnd2 null mouse embryos. Finally, through gene expression and network analyses, we highlight a critical role for CTNND2 in neuronal development and an intimate connection to chromatin biology. Our data contribute to the understanding of the genetic architecture of autism and suggest that genetic analyses of phenotypic extremes, such as female-enriched multiplex families, are of innate value in multifactorial disorders.
    Nature 03/2015; DOI:10.1038/nature14186 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The endothelin receptor type A (EDNRA) signaling pathway is essential for the establishment of mandibular identity during development of the first pharyngeal arch. We report four unrelated individuals with the syndrome mandibulofacial dysostosis with alopecia (MFDA) who have de novo missense variants in EDNRA. Three of the four individuals have the same substitution, p.Tyr129Phe. Tyr129 is known to determine the selective affinity of EDNRA for endothelin 1 (EDN1), its major physiological ligand, and the p.Tyr129Phe variant increases the affinity of the receptor for EDN3, its non-preferred ligand, by two orders of magnitude. The fourth individual has a somatic mosaic substitution, p.Glu303Lys, and was previously described as having Johnson-McMillin syndrome. The zygomatic arch of individuals with MFDA resembles that of mice in which EDNRA is ectopically activated in the maxillary prominence, resulting in a maxillary to mandibular transformation, suggesting that the p.Tyr129Phe variant causes an EDNRA gain of function in the developing upper jaw. Our in vitro and in vivo assays suggested complex, context-dependent effects of the EDNRA variants on downstream signaling. Our findings highlight the importance of finely tuned regulation of EDNRA signaling during human craniofacial development and suggest that modification of endothelin receptor-ligand specificity was a key step in the evolution of vertebrate jaws. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 03/2015; 96(4). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.01.015 · 10.99 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

12k Citations
2,988.46 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2015
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Department of Cell Biology
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
    • Duke University
      • Department of Medicine
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 2013
    • Monell Chemical Senses Center
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      • Division of Nephrology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002–2010
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
      • • McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2006
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2000–2001
    • Baylor College of Medicine
      • Department of Molecular & Human Genetics
      Houston, Texas, United States