Kunyong Xu

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (6)4.43 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) was approved by the US FDA in 1995 for the treatment of anterior corneal disorders. The surgery entails ablation of corneal tissue using excimer laser in order to treat visual pathologies limited to the anterior third of the cornea. Although considered to be an interim procedure for certain indications, such as bullous keratopathy, PTK is a viable option for recurrent corneal erosion syndrome and postsurgical scarring. This review will discuss the indications, outcomes and complications of PTK in clinical practice.
    Expert Review of Ophthalmology 01/2014; 9(1).
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    Kunyong Xu
    Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien 06/2012; 58(6):e357. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine whether different government-insured eye care coverage policies affect adolescents' access to eye care providers (ophthalmologists and optometrists) in Canada. Cross-sectional survey. 11 015 Canadian adolescents aged 12 to 17 participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2007-2008. Self-reported use of eye care providers, was compared between adolescents with and without government-insured routine eye examinations. The association between the utilization and the government coverage was evaluated by using prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Across Canada, 45.6% of adolescents used eye care providers over a 12-month period. The utilization rate was highest (46.4%) in provinces with insured routine eye examinations, lower (35.9%) in provinces without insured routine eye examinations, and lowest (27.1%) in the 3 territories. Significantly lower utilization rates were also found in males (10% less likely than females); in those without dwelling ownership (19% less likely than those who owned); in those who read fewer than 3 hours weekly (13% less likely than in those who read 3 or more hours per week); and in nondiabetics. After adjusting for the confounding effects of these factors, we found that adolescents living in provinces with uninsured routine eye examinations were 24% less likely to utilize eye care services (PR = 0.76; 95% CI 0.67-0.85); whereas those in the 3 territories were nearly 40% less likely to use eye care providers (PR = 0.63; 95% CI 0.48-0.83) compared to adolescents in provinces with insured routine eye examinations. Lack of eye care insurance for routine eye examinations has a negative impact on adolescents' access to eye care providers in Canada.
    Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology 06/2012; 47(3):211-6. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:  The aim was to retrospectively analyse the reasons for not performing laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery among refractive surgery candidates at a university eye clinic. Methods:  Case records of patients who presented to a university eye clinic between June 2005 and June 2010 for consideration for LASIK surgery were examined. Cases that did not undergo LASIK were selected for analysis. Reasons for not performing surgery in these cases were analysed. Results:  In total, 552 patients requested LASIK between July 2005 and June 2010 and 377 (68.3 per cent) of them received refractive surgery. Among 175 (31.7 per cent) patients who did not get LASIK, 62 (35.4 per cent) were male and 113 (64.6 per cent) were female, with a mean age at presentation of 36.4 ± 9.3 years (range: 19 to 78 years). The most common reasons for not offering LASIK were low corneal thickness (28.6 per cent), high myopia (15.4 per cent), large pupil (8.0 per cent) and keratoconus (7.4 per cent). Overall, 39 patients (22.3 per cent) changed their mind after their initial consultations with surgeons. The prevalence of rejection of LASIK decreased from 44.1 per cent between July 2005 and June 2006 to 3.5 per cent between July 2009 and June 2010. Conclusions:  Reasons for not performing refractive surgery are quite diverse. Inadequate corneal thickness and change of mind after initial consultation were the most common reasons in the present study. There was a marked change in magnitude and trend of reasons for not performing LASIK over the study period. Further studies from settings other than university hospitals would be beneficial to compare the trend in patient selection.
    Clinical and Experimental Optometry 05/2012; · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • Kunyong Xu, Vishal Jhanji
    Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien 05/2012; 58(5):537, 540, 542. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    Kunyong Xu, Vishal Jhanji
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    ABSTRACT: Correction of refractive errors can be achieved with spectacles, contact lenses, and refractive surgery. The past decade has seen a surge in the availability of alternatives for patients and surgeons in terms of both surgical and nonsurgical options for the management of refractive errors. Newer generation contact lenses provide enhanced safety and better handling, whereas modern-day refractive surgery presents a plethora of choices based on the clinical characteristics and requirements of patients. We have moved from an era of "one size fits all" to a purely customized way of treating patients with refractive errors. This review presents the background, advantages, and disadvantages of the two most commonly used options for correction of ametropia, ie, contact lenses and refractive surgery.
    Clinical Optometry. 01/2011; 3:63-72.