Pedro Luiz Rosalen

University of Campinas, Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (88)168.19 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To compare the pharmacokinetic profiles and to evaluate the bioequivalence of two commercial amoxicillin suspension formulations (500 mg/5 mL AMOXIL®, reference formulation and AMOXI-PED®, test formulation) in healthy Brazilian volunteers. Methods: Under fasting condition, 25 volunteers (13 males and 12 females) were included in this randomized, open-label, two-period crossover (1-week washout interval) bioequivalence study. Blood samples were collected at pre-dose (0 hour) and 0.5, 1, 1.33, 1.66, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after drug ingestion. Pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC0-tlast, and AUC0-∞) were calculated from plasma concentrations for both formulations in each subject. Results: Arithmetic mean values of the pharmacokinetic parameters were: Cmax = 12.004 (± 2.824) μg×mL-1; tmax = 1.118 (± 0.396) h; t1/2 = 1.226 (± 0.179) h; AUC0-tlast = 29.297 (± 6.007) μg×h×mL-1; and AUC0-∞ = 29.299 (± 6.007) μg×h×mL-1 for reference formulation and Cmax = 11.456 (± 2.825) μg×mL-1; tmax = 1.331 (± 0.509) h; t1/2 = 1.141 (± 0.133) h; AUC0-tlast = 28.672 (± 5.778) μg×h×mL-1; and AUC0-∞ = 28.693 (± 5.796) μg×h×mL-1 for test formulation. The confidence intervals (90% CI) for reference and test formulations were, respectively, 90.74 - 100.46% for Cmax and 93.62 - 103.61% for AUC0-t. Conclusion: Based on the results, both formulations of amoxicillin evaluated in this study were considered bioequivalent according to FDA and ANVISA/Brazil criteria.
    International journal of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics 04/2014; · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Petit Verdot Extract and hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions obtained from grape pomace, in addition to identifying active compounds. The PVE and EAF reduced significantly paw edema and neutrophil migration when compared with control groups. The PVE reduced levels of TNF-α and IL1-β in the peritoneal fluid, whereas the EAF did not reduce cytokines significantly. Two hydroxybenzoic acids, two proanthocyanidins, three flavan-3-ol monomers and three anthocyanins were identified in the PVE and EAF by LC-MS/MS. The stilbene trans-resveratrol was identified only in the EAF. The phenolic compounds were quantified using HPLC-DAD analysis, except for the stilbenes, which were not sensible for the detection by the method. Since PVE and EAF showed significantly anti-inflammatory effects and high concentration of phenolic compounds, we concluded that Petit Verdot pomace could be an interesting source of anti-inflammatory bioactives.
    Journal of Functional Foods. 01/2014; 8:292–300.
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    ABSTRACT: Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic fungal infection of the oral cavity with increasingly worldwide prevalence and incidence rates. Novel specifically-targeted strategies to manage this ailment have been proposed using essential oils (EO) known to have antifungal properties. In this study, we aim to investigate the antifungal activity and mode of action of the EO from Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander) leaves on Candida spp. In addition, we detected the molecular targets affected in whole-genome expression in human cells. The EO phytochemical profile indicates monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as major components, which are likely to negatively impact the viability of yeast cells. There seems to be a synergistic activity of the EO chemical compounds as their isolation into fractions led to a decreased antimicrobial effect. C. sativum EO may bind to membrane ergosterol, increasing ionic permeability and causing membrane damage leading to cell death, but it does not act on cell wall biosynthesis-related pathways. This mode of action is illustrated by photomicrographs showing disruption in biofilm integrity caused by the EO at varied concentrations. The EO also inhibited Candida biofilm adherence to a polystyrene substrate at low concentrations, and decreased the proteolytic activity of Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration. Finally, the EO and its selected active fraction had low cytotoxicity on human cells, with putative mechanisms affecting gene expression in pathways involving chemokines and MAP-kinase (proliferation/apoptosis), as well as adhesion proteins. These findings highlight the potential antifungal activity of the EO from C. sativum leaves and suggest avenues for future translational toxicological research.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(6):e99086. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to perform an in vitro analysis of the antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential of an extract from Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan (angico) and chemically characterize the crude extract. Antimicrobial action was evaluated based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration, and the inhibition of formation to oral biofilm. Cell morphology was determined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Six strains of tumor cells were used for the determination of antiproliferative potential. The extract demonstrated strong antifungal activity against Candida albicans ATCC 18804 (MIC = 0.031 mg/mL), with similar activity found regarding the ethyl acetate fraction. The extract and active fraction also demonstrated the capacity to inhibit the formation of Candida albicans to oral biofilm after 48 hours, with median values equal to or greater than the control group, but the difference did not achieve statistical significance (P > 0.05). SEM revealed alterations in the cell morphology of the yeast. Regarding antiproliferative activity, the extract demonstrated cytostatic potential in all strains tested. The present findings suggest strong antifungal potential for Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan as well as a tendency toward diminishing the growth of human tumor cells.
    Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM. 01/2014; 2014:802696.
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the influences of the neovestitol-vestitol (NV) containing fraction isolated from Brazilian red propolis on the development of biofilm and expression of virulence factors by Streptococcus mutans using saliva-coated surfaces of hydroxyapatite. In addition, NV was tested in a rodent model of dental caries to assess its potential effectiveness in vivo. Topical applications of NV (800 μg ml(-1)) significantly impaired the accumulation of biofilms of S. mutans by largely disrupting the synthesis of glucosyltransferase-derived exopolysaccharides and the expression of genes associated with the adaptive stress response, such as copYAZ and sloA. Of even greater impact, NV was as effective as fluoride (positive control) in reducing the development of carious lesions in vivo. NV is a promising natural anti-biofilm agent that targets essential virulence traits in S. mutans, which are associated with the formation of cariogenic biofilm and the subsequent onset of dental caries disease.
    Biofouling 10/2013; · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Guava pomace is an example of the processing waste generated after the manufacturing process from the juice industry that could be a source of bioactives. Thus, the present investigation was carried out in order to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive potential and determinate the main phenolic compounds of a guava pomace extract (GPE). The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, histamine-induced paw edema and neutrophils migration in the peritoneal cavity models. Acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin test were performed to investigate the antinociceptive effects. In addition, the content of total phenolic and of individual phenolic compounds was determined by GC/MS. GPE showed anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, histamine-induced paw edema and neutrophils migration in the peritoneal cavity models (p < 0.05). GPE also demonstrated antinociceptive activity by acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin test (p < 0.05). The total phenolic value was 3.40 +/- 0.09 mg GAE/g and epicatechin, quercetin, myricetin, isovanilic and gallic acids were identified by GC/MS analysis. The presence of bioactive phenolic compounds as well as important effects demonstrated in animal models suggest that guava pomace could be an interesting source of anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 09/2013; 13(1):235. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of neovestitol and vestitol isolated from Brazilian red propolis (BRP). BRP ethanolic extract (EEP), neovestitol and vestitol were evaluated by anti-inflammatory properties using a neutrophil migration assays. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC) against Sreptococcus mutans, Sreptococcus sobrinus, Sthaphylococcus aureus, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Neovestitol, vestitol and EEP inhibited neutrophil migration at dose of 10 mg/Kg. Regarding antimicrobial activity, neovestitol showed MIC ranging from <6.25 to 25-50 µg/mL and MBC ranging from 25-50 to 50-100 µg/mL, while vestitol showed MIC ranging from 25-50 to 50-100 µg/mL and MBC ranging from 25-50 to 50-100 µg/mL. Both isoflavonoids, neovestitol and vestitol, are consistent bioactive compounds displaying anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities that can strongly act in low dose and concentration and have a promising potential to be applied on pharmaceutical and food industries.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 04/2013; · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Geopropolis is a type of propolis containing resin, wax, and soil, collected by threatened stingless bee species native to tropical countries and used in folk medicine. However, studies concerning the biological activity and chemical composition of geopropolis are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial and antiproliferative activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) collected by Melipona scutellaris and its bioactive fraction against important clinical microorganisms as well as their in vitro cytotoxicity and chemical profile. METHODS: The antimicrobial activity of EEGP and fractions was examined by determining their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against six bacteria strains as well as their ability to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm adherence. Total growth inhibition (TGI) was chosen to assay the antiproliferative activity of EEGP and its bioactive fraction against normal and cancer cell lines. The chemical composition of M. scutellaris geopropolis was identified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography--mass spectrometry. RESULTS: EEGP significantly inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus strains and S. mutans at low concentrations, and its hexane fraction (HF) presented the highest antibacterial activity. Also, both EEGP and HF inhibited S. mutans biofilm adherence (p < 0.05) and showed selectivity against human cancer cell lines, although only HF demonstrated selectivity at low concentrations. The chemical analyses performed suggest the absence of flavonoids and the presence of benzophenones as geopropolis major compounds. CONCLUSIONS: The empirical use of this unique type of geopropolis by folk medicine practitioners was confirmed in the present study, since it showed antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential against the cancer cell lines studied. It is possible that the major compounds found in this type of geopropolis are responsible for its properties.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 01/2013; 13(1):23. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 01/2013; 2013:907041. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bioactive nonpolar fraction of geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans biofilm. The ethanolic extract of Melipona scutellaris geopropolis was subjected to a liquid-liquid partition, thus obtaining the bioactive hexane fraction (HF) possessing antimicrobial activity. The effects of HF on S. mutans UA159 biofilms generated on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were analyzed by inhibition of formation, killing assay, and glycolytic pH-drop assays. Furthermore, biofilms treated with vehicle control and HF were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HF at 250 μ g/mL and 400 μ g/mL caused 38% and 53% reduction in the biomass of biofilm, respectively, when compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05) subsequently observed at SEM images, and this reduction was noticed in the amounts of extracellular alkali-soluble glucans, intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides, and proteins. In addition, the S. mutans viability (killing assay) and acid production by glycolytic pH drop were not affected (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the bioactive HF of geopropolis was promising to control the S. mutans biofilm formation, without affecting the microbial population but interfering with its structure by reducing the biochemical content of biofilm matrix.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 01/2013; 2013:256287. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Culturing methods are the primary approach for microbiological analysis of plaque biofilms in rodent models of dental caries. In this study, we developed strategies for the isolation of DNA and RNA from plaque biofilms formed in vivo to analyse the viable bacterial population and gene expression. Plaque biofilm samples from rats were treated with propidium monoazide to isolate DNA from viable cells, and the purified DNA was used to quantify total bacteria and the Streptococcus mutans population via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and specific primers; the same samples were also analysed by counting colony-forming units (CFU). In parallel, RNA was isolated from plaque-biofilm samples (from the same animals) and used for transcriptional analyses via reverse transcription-qPCR. The viable populations of both S. mutans and total bacteria assessed by qPCR were positively correlated with the CFU data (P < 0.001; r > 0.8). However, the qPCR data showed higher bacterial cell counts, particularly for total bacteria (vs. CFU). Moreover, S. mutans proportion in the plaque biofilm determined by qPCR analysis showed strong correlation with incidence of smooth-surface caries (P = 0.0022, r = 0.71). The purified RNAs presented high RNA integrity numbers (>7), which allowed measurement of the expression of genes that are critical for S. mutans virulence (e.g. gtfB and gtfC). Our data show that the viable microbial population and the gene expression can be analysed simultaneously, providing a global assessment of the infectious aspect of dental caries. Our approach could enhance the value of the current rodent model in further understanding the pathophysiology of this disease and facilitating the exploration of novel anti-caries therapies.
    Molecular oral microbiology. 10/2012; 27(5):350-61.
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    ABSTRACT: Biological assays that have been performed on different types of Brazilian propolis have shown that type 6 propolis (G6) has a strong antimicrobial activity and a low flavonoid content. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between the phenolic composition and the biological activities displayed by propolis G6 from the state of Bahia and green propolis, also known as type 12 (G12). The values of the flavonoids and the total phenolics in propolis G6 were different than those in propolis G12. Although the G12 variety presented greater antioxidant activity, propolis G6 proved to have greater antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. The results showed that the phenolic compounds may not be the only compounds responsible for the biological activity. More detailed studies of the chemical composition and an assessment of the biological activity are required to establish the quality of propolis.
    Brazilian Journal of Pharmaceutical Science 09/2012; 48(3):557-564. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The pharmacological activity of geopropolis collected by stingless bees (important and threatened pollinators), a product widely used in folk medicine by several communities in Brazil, especially in the Northeast Region, needs to be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of Melipona scutellaris geopropolis (stingless bee) using different models of nociception. The antinociceptive activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) and fractions was evaluated using writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin test, carrageenan-induced hypernociception, and quantification of IL-1β and TNF-α. The chemical composition was assessed by quantification of total flavonoids and phenolic compounds. EEGP and its hexane and aqueous fractions showed antinociceptive activity. Both EEGP and its aqueous fraction presented activity in the mechanical inflammatory hypernociception induced by the carrageenan model, an effect mediated by the inhibition of IL-1β and TNF-α. The chemical composition of EEGP and its hexane and aqueous fractions showed a significant presence of phenolic compounds and absence of flavonoids. Our data indicate that geopropolis is a natural source of bioactive substances with promising antinociceptive activity.
    Journal of ethnopharmacology 08/2012; 143(2):709-15. · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CAPE on the insulin signaling and inflammatory pathway in the liver of mice with high fat diet induced obesity. Swiss mice were fed with standard chow or high-fat diet for 12-week. After the eighth week, animals in the HFD group with serum glucose levels higher than 200mg/dL were divided into two groups, HFD and HFD receiving 30mg/kg of CAPE for 4weeks. After 12weeks, the blood samples could be collected and liver tissue extracted for hormonal and biochemical measurements, and insulin signaling and inflammatory pathway analyzes. The high-fat diet group exhibited more weight gain, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis compared with standard diet group. The CAPE treatment showed improvement in glucose sensitivity characterized by an area under glucose curve similar to the control group in an oral glucose tolerance test Furthermore, CAPE treatment promoted amelioration in hepatic steatosis compared with the high-fat diet group. The increase in glucose sensitivity was associated with the improvement in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-2, followed by an increase in Akt phosphorylation. In addition, it was observed that CAPE reduced the induction of the inflammatory pathway, c-jun-N- terminal kinase, the nuclear factor kappa B, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression, respectively. Overall, these findings indicate that CAPE exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that partly restores normal metabolism, reduces the molecular changes observed in obesity and insulin resistance, and therefore has a potential as a therapeutic agent in obesity.
    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 05/2012; 61(11):1606-14. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the activity of essential oils (EOs) against Streptococcus mutans biofilm by chemically characterizing their fractions responsible for biological and antiproliferative activity. Twenty EO were obtained by hydrodistillation and submitted to the antimicrobial assay (minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations) against S. mutans UA159. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used for phytochemical analyses. EOs were selected according to predetermined criteria and fractionated using dry column; the resulting fractions were assessed by MIC and MBC, selected as active fractions, and evaluated against S. mutans biofilm. Biofilms formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Selected EOs and their selected active fractions were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against keratinocytes and seven human tumor cell lines. MIC and MBC values obtained for EO and their active fractions showed strong antimicrobial activity. Chemical analyses mainly showed the presence of terpenes. The selected active fractions inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation (P < 0.05) did not affect glycolytic pH drop and were inactive against keratinocytes, normal cell line. In conclusion, EO showed activity at low concentrations, and their selected active fractions were also effective against biofilm formed by S. mutans and human tumor cell lines.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 01/2012; 2012:751435. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been found recently to possess anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigates the effects of fluoxetine on inflammatory tissue destruction in a rat model of ligature-induced periodontal disease. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 10 animals per group): 1) control rats (without ligature); 2) rats with ligature + placebo (saline; oral gavage); and 3) rats with ligature + fluoxetine (20 mg/kg/day in saline; oral gavage). Histologic analyses were performed on the furcation region and mesial aspect of mandibular first molars of rats sacrificed at 15 days after ligature-induced periodontal disease. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and zymography were performed to analyze the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and inducible nitric oxide synthase and the MMP-9 activity, respectively, in gingival tissues samples. Compared to the ligature + placebo group, alveolar bone loss was reduced in the fluoxetine group (P <0.05), and the amount of collagen fibers in the gingival tissue was maintained. Moreover, in gingival tissue sampled 3 days after ligature attachment, fluoxetine administration reduced IL-1β and COX-2 mRNA expression. Fluoxetine downregulated MMP-9 activity, without affecting MMP-9 mRNA expression induced by ligature, compared to the ligature + placebo group (P <0.05). These data suggest that fluoxetine suppressed proinflammatory responses, as well as proteolytic enzyme activity, induced by ligature. In the present study, fluoxetine suppresses the inflammatory response and protects against periodontal bone resorption and destruction of collagen fibers, suggesting that fluoxetine can constitute a promising therapeutic approach for periodontal diseases.
    Journal of Periodontology 10/2011; 83(5):664-71. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candida albicans and mutans streptococci are frequently detected in dental plaque biofilms from toddlers afflicted with early childhood caries. Glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) secreted by Streptococcus mutans bind to saliva-coated apatite (sHA) and to bacterial surfaces, synthesizing exopolymers in situ, which promote cell clustering and adherence to tooth enamel. We investigated the potential role Gtfs may play in mediating the interactions between C. albicans SC5314 and S. mutans UA159, both with each other and with the sHA surface. GtfB adhered effectively to the C. albicans yeast cell surface in an enzymatically active form, as determined by scintillation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging. The glucans formed on the yeast cell surface were more susceptible to dextranase than those synthesized in solution or on sHA and bacterial cell surfaces (P < 0.05), indicating an elevated α-1,6-linked glucose content. Fluorescence imaging revealed that larger numbers of S. mutans cells bound to C. albicans cells with glucans present on their surface than to yeast cells without surface glucans (uncoated). The glucans formed in situ also enhanced C. albicans interactions with sHA, as determined by a novel single-cell micromechanical method. Furthermore, the presence of glucan-coated yeast cells significantly increased the accumulation of S. mutans on the sHA surface (versus S. mutans incubated alone or mixed with uncoated C. albicans; P < 0.05). These data reveal a novel cross-kingdom interaction that is mediated by bacterial GtfB, which readily attaches to the yeast cell surface. Surface-bound GtfB promotes the formation of a glucan-rich matrix in situ and may enhance the accumulation of S. mutans on the tooth enamel surface, thereby modulating the development of virulent biofilms.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 07/2011; 77(18):6357-67. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    J-G Jeon, P L Rosalen, M L Falsetta, H Koo
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    ABSTRACT: Dental caries is the most prevalent and costly oral infectious disease worldwide. Virulent biofilms firmly attached to tooth surfaces are prime biological factors associated with this disease. The formation of an exopolysaccharide-rich biofilm matrix, acidification of the milieu and persistent low pH at the tooth-biofilm interface are major controlling virulence factors that modulate dental caries pathogenesis. Each one offers a selective therapeutic target for prevention. Although fluoride, delivered in various modalities, remains the mainstay for the prevention of caries, additional approaches are required to enhance its effectiveness. Available antiplaque approaches are based on the use of broad-spectrum microbicidal agents, e.g. chlorhexidine. Natural products offer a rich source of structurally diverse substances with a wide range of biological activities, which could be useful for the development of alternative or adjunctive anticaries therapies. However, it is a challenging approach owing to complex chemistry and isolation procedures to derive active compounds from natural products. Furthermore, most of the studies have been focused on the general inhibitory effects on glucan synthesis as well as on bacterial metabolism and growth, often employing methods that do not address the pathophysiological aspects of the disease (e.g. bacteria in biofilms) and the length of exposure/retention in the mouth. Thus, the true value of natural products in caries prevention and/or their exact mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, natural substances potentially active against virulent properties of cariogenic organisms have been identified. This review focuses on gaps in the current knowledge and presents a model for investigating the use of natural products in anticaries chemotherapy.
    Caries Research 05/2011; 45(3):243-63. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tetracycline antibiotics, including doxycycli\e (DOX), have been used to treat bone resorptive diseases, partially because of their activity to suppress osteoclastogenesis induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, their precise inhibitory mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, the present study examined the effect of Dox on osteoclastogenesis signaling induced by RANKL, both in vitro and in vivo. Although Dox inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and down-modulated the mRNA expression of functional osteoclast markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K, Dox neither affected RANKL-induced MAPKs phosphorylation nor NFATc1 gene expression in RAW264.7 murine monocytic cells. Gelatin zymography and Western blot analyses showed that Dox down-regulated the enzyme activity of RANKL-induced MMP-9, but without affecting its protein expression. Furthermore, MMP-9 enzyme inhibitor also attenuated both RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and up-regulation of TRAP and cathepsin K mRNA expression, indicating that MMP-9 enzyme action is engaged in the promotion of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Finally, Dox treatment abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and TRAP activity in mouse calvaria along with the suppression of MMP9 enzyme activity, again without affecting the expression of MMP9 protein. These findings suggested that Dox inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by its inhibitory effect on MMP-9 enzyme activity independent of the MAPK-NFATc1 signaling cascade.
    Experimental Cell Research 03/2011; 317(10):1454-64. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 7-epiclusianone (7-epi) on specific virulence attributes of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and on development of dental caries in vivo. 7-Epi was obtained and purified from fruits of Rheedia brasiliensis. We investigated its influence on surface-adsorbed glucosyltransferase (Gtf) B activity, acid production, and viability of S. MUTANS in biofilms, as well as on caries development using a rodent model. 7-Epi (100 µg/mL) significantly reduced the activity of surface-adsorbed GtfB (up to 48.0 ± 1.8 of inhibition at 100 µg/mL) and glycolytic pH-drop by S. mutans in biofilms (125 and 250 µg/mL) (vs. vehicle control, p < 0.05). In contrast, the test compound did not significantly affect the bacterial viability when compared to vehicle control (15 % ethanol, p > 0.05). Wistar rats treated topically with 7-epi (twice daily, 60-s exposure) showed significantly smaller number of and less severe smooth- and sulcal-surface carious lesions (p < 0.05), without reducing the S. mutans viable population from the animals' dental biofilms. In conclusion, the natural compound 7-epiclusianone may be a potentially novel pharmacological agent to prevent and control dental caries disease.
    Planta Medica 01/2011; 77(1):40-5. · 2.35 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
168.19 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2014
    • University of Campinas
      • Faculty of Dentistry from Piracicaba
      Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2011
    • Chonbuk National University
      Tsiuentcheou, North Jeolla, South Korea
  • 1996–2011
    • University of Rochester
      • Center for Oral Biology
      Rochester, NY, United States
  • 2003–2009
    • University Center Rochester
      • Center for Oral Biology
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
    • São Paulo State University
      • Departamento de Ciências Biológicas (Bauru)
      São Paulo, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • 2008
    • Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde de São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2007
    • State University of Ponta Grossa
      • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil