Yonghua Cui

Government of the People's Republic of China, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (10)24.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Many studies have shown that chronic stress can cause neuronal damage and depression, but this exact mechanism still remains unknown. Neurons are vulnerable to lipid peroxidation-induced damage because the major part of neuronal cell membrane is polyunsaturated fatty acids that are substrate for reactive oxygen species. Since endogenous antioxidant defense systems normally eliminate production of reactive oxygen species, deficient antioxidant defense can cause oxidative stress-induced damage. In the present study, to understand the role of endogenous antioxidant defense in chronic stress-induced neuronal damage, we analyzed lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress. We found that chronic unpredictable stress for four weeks in rats induced depressive-like behaviors such as anhedonia, despair and decreased exploration. Malondialdehyde, a lipid peroxidation product, is increased, but total antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase activity and catalase activity are decreased in brain of rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress. Our findings suggest that down regulation of endogenous antioxidant defense induces lipid peroxidation contributing a role to chronic stress and depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Neuroscience Letters 10/2014; 584C:208-213. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have the potential to produce reactive oxygen species and can be transferred from the mother to the fetal brain. The central nervous system exhibits remarkable plasticity in early life and can be altered significantly by environmental stressors encountered during fetal period. Additionally, prenatal stressors are involved with emotional problems in adulthood. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether prenatal exposure to TiO2 NPs could induce oxidative damage in the offspring brain and eventually affect the emotional behaviors in adulthood. The results showed that prenatal exposure to TiO2 NPs impaired the antioxidant status, caused a significant oxidative damage to nucleic acids and lipids in the brain of newborn pups, and enhanced the depressive-like behaviors during adulthood in the force swimming test and the sucrose preference test. These results suggest that the stress during fetal life induced by prenatal exposure to TiO2 NPs could be implicated in depressive-like behaviors in adulthood.
    Chemosphere 08/2013; · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-fat diets (HFDs) have been found to influence central nervous system development and to cause cognitive impairments in human epidemiologic studies, as well as in animal investigations. These adverse effects on learning and memory induced by an HFD have been associated with an impaired hippocampus, including hippocampal oxidative damage. Previously, we had found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) could ameliorate the oxidative stress in non-neural organs (liver, jejunum, and spleen) induced by a 10-week HFD (21.2% fat) food regimen in mice. In this study, we investigated whether a 10-week HFD (21.2% fat) induced oxidative stress in the hippocampus or impaired spatial learning in mice and whether LA ameliorated these effects. The HFD was found to induce oxidative stress (a decrease in catalase activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, and total antioxidative capacity and an increase in malondialdehyde levels) in the mouse hippocampus. In addition, we found that the HFD impaired spatial recognition memory of mice in the Y-maze paradigm. Furthermore, the hippocampal oxidative stress and impaired spatial recognition memory of the mice were reduced in HFD diets supplemented with 0.1% LA. These findings suggest that LA, as a strong antioxidant, may help prevent HFD-induced learning impairments by ameliorating associated oxidative stress in the hippocampus.
    Journal of medicinal food 07/2012; 15(8):713-7. · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The exposures to extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) in our environment have dramatically increased. Epidemiological studies suggest that there is a possible association between ELF-MF exposure and increased risks of cardiovascular disease, cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Animal studies show that ELF-MF exposure may interfere with the activity of brain cells, generate behavioral and cognitive disturbances, and produce deficits in attention, perception and spatial learning. Although, many research efforts have been focused on the interaction between ELF-MF exposure and the central nervous system, the mechanism of interaction is still unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of ELF-MF exposure on learning in mice using two water maze tasks and on some parameters indicative of oxidative stress in the hippocampus and striatum. We found that ELF-MF exposure (1 mT, 50 Hz) induced serious oxidative stress in the hippocampus and striatum and impaired hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and striatum-dependent habit learning. This study provides evidence for the association between the impairment of learning and the oxidative stress in hippocampus and striatum induced by ELF-MF exposure.
    PLoS ONE 05/2012; 7(5):e32196. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lithium is the first line of therapeutic drugs used to treat both mania and depression in bipolar disorder.Although a body of research suggests that lithium acts as a cognitive enhancer, other animal studies suggest that lithium induces cognitive deficits. Comparatively, the effects of lithium on cognitive behaviour in these studies are inconsistent and contradictory. Further investigations in different species of animals and behavioural tasks are important to evaluate the possibility that lithium may act as a cognitive enhancer. In the present study, the chicks were treated intraperitoneally with lithium chloride (120 mg/kg), and the effects of chronic lithium treatment on chick cognitive behaviour were examined using a detour learning task.Additionally, the effects of chronic lithium treatment on BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were measured in RTPCR. We found that chronic lithium treatment(120 mg/kg) had no effect on spontaneous motor activity or weight gain of the chicks and that the chicks had a general healthy appearance, while chronic lithium treatment significantly promoted the response latency of detour learning and BDNF mRNA expression. These results suggest that chronic lithium treatment may improve cognitive function.
    Biological trace element research 01/2012; 148(1):38-43. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal aluminum exposure may affect the development of the embryo and alter the capacity for learning and memory in adults. The chick embryo is a good experimental model to study the effect of prenatal toxin exposure on cognitive defects in offspring, because it eliminates maternal confounding variables. In the present study, we applied a one-trial passive avoidance-learning task in day-old chicks to examine the effects of prenatal aluminum chloride injections (2, 20, and 200 mM in 200 µl per egg, daily over a period of 4 successive days) on memory consolidation. The data suggest that chicks injected with aluminum chloride (20 mM) daily from E12 to E15 had significantly impaired short-term memory, intermediate-term memory, and long-term memory (LTM) after training (p < .05) but chicks injected with aluminum chloride (2 mM) had impaired LTM only.
    Developmental Psychobiology 07/2011; 54(2):133-8. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lanthanum cations are well known for their inhibitory actions on calcium channels, and calcium cations are indispensable for the development of brain. Lanthanum may interfere with the developing central nervous system. Detour learning task in chicks is an excellent model to study the development of central nervous system. In the present study, we examined the effects of lanthanum chloride exposure on the development of spatial cognition using the detour learning task. The data suggest that the chicks injected with lanthanum chloride (10 or 5 mM) had significantly delayed the response latency of detour learning but not the chicks injected with lanthanum chloride (1 mM). The effect of lanthanum exposure on the development of spatial cognition is dose relative.
    Biological trace element research 09/2010; 143(1):274-80. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Environmental exposure to lead during developmental stages has been established as a potential cause of intellectual deficits. The high susceptibility of rapidly developing fetal and infant brains to external factors suggests that impairment of later cognitive functions may arise from relatively minor prenatal exposure to environmental lead levels. In this study, we used the one-trial passive avoidance learning paradigm with day old chicks to evaluate memory function and memory consolidation in response to prenatal lead exposure. Lead acetate (5.5mg/kg, 11mg/kg, 16.5mg/kg) was administered daily from E9 to E16 via direct injection into the airspace in chick eggs. Higher doses of lead acetate (11mg/kg, 16.5mg/kg) administration had significant effects on the hatching success (23.4 and 17, respectively) and hatch weight ( approximately 10% decrease) of chicks when compared to equivalent treatments of sodium acetate (11mg/kg, 16.5mg/kg) (p<0.001). Low doses of lead acetate (5.5mg/kg) did not significantly affect chick hatching, weight or morphology compared to equivalent sodium acetate treatments (5.5mg/kg) and controls. However, lead acetate (5.5mg/kg) was found to significantly impair long-term memory after 120min following training in the one-trial passive avoidance learning task (p<0.05). These findings add to a growing body of evidence that suggests lead toxicity during fetal development leads to impairment in cognitive and memory processes.
    Neuroscience Letters 04/2010; 476(1):23-6. · 2.06 Impact Factor
  • Yi Che, Yonghua Cui, Xinghong Jiang
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    ABSTRACT: Lanthanum cations (La 3+) are well known for their inhibitory actions on calcium channels. Prenatal lanthanum exposure may affect the development of embryo and alter the capacity for learning and memory in adults, and the one-trial passive avoidance learning paradigm with day-old chicks is an excellent model to study several mechanisms of memory formation. In the present study, we examined the effects of prenatal lanthanum chloride exposure on memory consolidation using one-trial passive avoidance learning task in day-old chicks. The data suggest that chicks injected with lanthanum chloride (2 mg/kg) daily from E9 to E16 had significantly impaired long-term memory at 120 min after training (p < 0.05) but not the chicks injected with lanthanum chloride (0.1 mg/kg) daily from E9 to E16.
    Biological trace element research 10/2008; 127(1):37-44. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we examined the effects of exposure to an extremely low-frequency magnetic field of 1 mT intensity on learning and memory in Lohmann brown domestic chicks using detour learning task. These results show that 20 h/day exposure to a low-frequency magnetic field induces a significant impairment in detour learning but 50 min/day exposure has no effect.
    Brain Research Bulletin 10/2007; 74(1-3):178-82. · 2.97 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

29 Citations
24.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Government of the People's Republic of China
      Peping, Beijing, China
    • Jiangnan University
      Wu-hsi, Jiangsu Sheng, China
  • 2011
    • Soochow University (PRC)
      Wu-hsien, Jiangsu Sheng, China
  • 2007
    • Suzhou University
      • Life Sciences School
      Suchow, Anhui Sheng, China