D J Bartley

Moredun Research Institute, Penicuik, Scotland, United Kingdom

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Publications (47)90.98 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Haemonchus contortus, a highly pathogenic and economically important parasitic nematode of sheep, is particularly adept at developing resistance to the anthelmintic drugs used in its treatment and control. The basis of anthelmintic resistance is poorly understood for many commonly used drugs with most research being focused on mechanisms involving drug targets or drug efflux. Altered or increased drug metabolism is a possible mechanism that has yet to receive much attention despite the clear role of xenobiotic metabolism in pesticide resistance in insects. The cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are a large family of drug-metabolising enzymes present in almost all living organisms, but for many years thought to be absent from parasitic nematodes. In this paper, we describe the CYP sequences encoded in the H. contortus genome and compare their expression in different parasite life-stages, sexes and tissues. We developed a novel real-time PCR approach based on partially assembled CYP sequences “tags” and confirmed findings in the subsequent draft genome with RNA-seq. Constitutive expression was highest in larval stages for the majority of CYPs, although higher expression was detected in the adult male or female for a small subset of genes. Many CYPs were expressed in the worm intestine. A number of H. contortus genes share high identity with Caenorhabditis elegans CYPs and the similarity in their expression profiles supports their classification as putative orthologues. Notably, H. contortus appears to lack the dramatic CYP subfamily expansions seen in C. elegans and other species, which are typical of CYPs with exogenous roles. However, a small group of H. contortus genes cluster with the C. elegans CYP34 and CYP35 subfamilies and may represent candidate xenobiotic metabolising genes in the parasite.
    International Journal for Parasitology. 12/2014; 44.
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    ABSTRACT: The mechanisms involved in anthelmintic resistance (AR) are complex but a greater understanding of AR management is essential for effective and sustainable control of parasitic helminth worms in livestock. Current tests to measure AR are time consuming and can be technically problematic, gold standard diagnostics are therefore urgently required to assist in combatting the threat from drug resistant parasites. For anthelmintics such as ivermectin (IVM), target proteins may be present in the cellular membrane. As proteins usually act in complexes and not in isolation, AR may develop and be measurable in the target associated proteins present in the parasite membrane. The model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was used to develop a sub-proteomic assay to measure protein expression differences, between IVM resistant and IVM susceptible isolates in the presence and absence of drug challenge. Evaluation of detergents including CHAPS, ASB-14, C7BzO, Triton ×100 and TBP (tributyl phosphine) determined optimal conditions for the resolution of membrane proteins in Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis (2DE). These sub-proteomic methodologies were then translated and evaluated using IVM-susceptible and IVM-resistant Haemonchus contortus; a pathogenic blood feeding parasitic nematode which is of global importance in livestock health, welfare and productivity. We have demonstrated the successful resolution of membrane associated proteins from both C. elegans and H. contortus isolates, using a combination of CHAPS and the zwitterionic amphiphilic surfactant ASB-14 to further support the detection of markers for AR. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Veterinary Parasitology 12/2014; · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Benzimidazole resistance is common amongst many ovine trichostrongylid nematodes species globally. Although anthelmintics have been used for over half a century in some areas of the world for the control of Nematodirus battus, resistance has never been detected. Veterinary investigations conducted in 2010 demonstrated reduced efficacy in a flock that had been treated previously with fenbendazole (FBZ), suggesting probable resistance in N. battus. Infective larvae (L3; designated MNba2) were generated from the original material to conduct a controlled efficacy test (CET). Faecal egg counts showed an average of 37% reduction in the FBZ treated group 7 days post treatment compared to the untreated lambs. Average worm burden results showed no reduction after FBZ treatment compared to the untreated group (3850 and 3850 worms respectively). A molecular assay to assess the frequency of the commonly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the ß-tubulin isotype 1 gene, F200Y and E198A, was developed. Larval genotypes were predominantly homozygous resistant at codon 200 SNP, ranging from 56%-83% and remained stable at 70% for adult worm populations taken from treated and control lambs in the CET. Only susceptible genotypes were found at codon 198. The allele frequency for F200Y ranged between 80-83% in adult worms taken from the CET from treated and control lambs. The results confirmed initial findings and demonstrated the first report of FBZ resistance in N. battus whilst providing evidence that the P200 point mutation in the ß-tubulin isotype 1 gene is a potential mechanism of resistance in the species.
    Veterinary Research 12/2014; 45(1):116. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Refugia-based drenching regimes have been widely recommended to slow development of anthelmintic resistance but there are few comparisons between different treatment approaches in the UK. The impact of four ivermectin treatment regimes on drug efficacy, lamb body weight and nematode contamination during a 154 day grazing season were evaluated in a consecutive five year field study. Regimes were whole-flock treatment every 4 weeks (NST), targeted selective treatment (TST) based on individual per- formance, strategic whole-flock treatments at pre-determined times (SPT) or whole-flock treatment when clinical signs were apparent (MT). Mean numbers of ivermectin drenches administered per season were 4.0, 1.8, 2.0 and 1.4 for NST, TST, SPT and MT groups, respectively. The mean anthelmintic efficacy (AE) for each treatment group was based on faecal egg count reduction post-treatment employing a boot- strap sampling based algorithm. Mean AE was 95–98% for all groups in 2006 and mean AE (95% confi- dence limits) for NST declined to 62% (55%, 68%) in 2010. In comparison, AE for TST, SPT and MT in 2010 were 86% (81%, 92%), 86% (83%, 90%) and 83% (78%, 88%), respectively. Body weight in TST and SPT was similar to NST in all years (p > 0.05), however MT lambs were lighter than NST in 2006–2008 (p 6 0.04). Tracer lamb worm burdens was lowest in NST but was not significantly different between other groups. Overall, both the TST and SPT regimes appeared to maintain animal performance and conserve anthelmintic efficacy compared with a neo-suppressive anthelmintic treatment regime.
    International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance. 12/2013; 3:77-84.
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  • The Veterinary record. 09/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The small ruminant parasite Haemonchus contortus is the most widely used parasitic nematode in drug discovery, vaccine development and anthelmintic resistance research. Its remarkable propensity to develop resistance threatens the viability of the sheep industry in many regions of the world and provides a cautionary example of the effect of mass drug administration to control parasitic nematodes. Its phylogenetic position makes it particularly well placed for comparison with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the most economically important parasites of livestock and humans. Here we report the detailed analysis of a draft genome assembly and extensive transcriptomic dataset for H. contortus. This represents the first genome to be published for a strongylid nematode and the most extensive transcriptomic dataset for any parasitic nematode reported to date. We show a general pattern of conservation of genome structure and gene content between H. contortus and C. elegans, but also a dramatic expansion of important parasite gene families. We identify genes involved in parasite-specific pathways such as blood feeding, neurological function, and drug metabolism. In particular, we describe complete gene repertoires for known drug target families, providing the most comprehensive understanding yet of the action of several important anthelmintics. Also, we identify a set of genes enriched in the parasitic stages of the lifecycle and the parasite gut that provide a rich source of vaccine and drug target candidates. The H. contortus genome and transcriptome provides an essential platform for postgenomic research in this and other important strongylid parasites.
    Genome biology 08/2013; 14(8):R88. · 10.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cyathostomins are considered to be the most important group of helminths to affect equids due to their high prevalence, potential pathogenicity and ability to develop anthelmintic resistance. Their control relies almost exclusively on frequent anthelmintic use. Currently, fenbendazole (FBZ), pyrantel embonate (PYR), ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) are licensed for use in horses in the UK. With no new anthelmintics likely to be licensed in the near future, it is essential that investigations into the efficacy of current anthelmintics in different locations are performed to help inform control programmes. Here, efficacy of FBZ, PYR, IVM and MOX in horse populations in the South of England was investigated. Horses with a strongyle faecal egg count (FEC) of ≥50eggs per gram (EPG) were enrolled onto a faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) study. Efficacy was determined by calculating the percentage reduction in FEC between the group mean at Day 0 and 14 days post-treatment. Efficacy was indicated when a group arithmetic faecal egg count reduction (FECR) of ≥90% was recorded for FBZ and PYR, and ≥95% for IVM and MOX. Between March and December 2012, 404 FECRT were performed on 12 yards examining 101, 110, 93 and 100 equids for FBZ, PYR, IVM, and MOX, respectively. FBZ resistance was identified on all yards (mean FECR range 0-65.8%). On 10 of 12 yards, PYR efficacy was >90% (91.0-99.4%) and on two yards, PYR resistance was suspected (86.8-87.2%). IVM (96.4-100%) and MOX (99.9-100%) were >95% efficacious on all yards. As the prevalence of FBZ resistance was 100%, the future use of this anthelmintic for the control of strongyles should be questioned. PYR should be used strategically to reduce reliance on the macrocyclic lactone class products. Over-dispersion of FEC between horses was observed (average k=0.21) with 80% of the strongyle eggs counted measured in 15% of horses tested, strongly supporting the application of targeted helminth control programmes in this host species.
    Veterinary Parasitology 06/2013; · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infection of humans and livestock with parasitic nematodes can have devastating effects on health and production, affecting food security in both developed and developing regions. Despite decades of research, the development of recombinant sub-unit vaccines against these pathogens has been largely unsuccessful. We have developed a strategy to identify protective antigens from Teladorsagia circumcincta, the major pathogen causing parasitic gastroenteritis in small ruminants in temperate regions, by studying IgA responses directed at proteins specific to post-infective larvae. Antigens were also selected on the basis of their potential immunomodulatory role at the host/parasite interface. Recombinant versions of eight molecules identified by immunoproteomics, homology with vaccine candidates in other nematodes and/or with potential immunoregulatory activities, were therefore administered to sheep in a single vaccine formulation. The vaccine was administered three times with Quil A adjuvant and the animals subsequently subjected to a repeated challenge infection designed to mimic field conditions. Levels of protection in the vaccinates were compared to those obtained in sheep administered with Quil A alone. The trial was performed on two occasions. In both trials, vaccinates had significantly lower mean fecal worm egg counts (FWECs) over the sampling period, with a mean reduction in egg output of 70% (Trial 1) and 58% (Trial 2). During the period of peak worm egg shedding, vaccinates shed 92% and 73% fewer eggs than did controls in Trials 1 and 2, respectively. At post mortem, vaccinates had 75% (Trial 1) and 56% (Trial 2) lower adult nematode burdens than the controls. These levels of protection are the highest observed in any system using a nematode recombinant sub-unit vaccine in the definitive ruminant host and indicate that control of parasitic helminths via vaccination with recombinant subunit vaccine cocktails is indeed an alternative option in the face of multi-drug resistance.
    Vaccine 05/2013; · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in Northern Ireland sheep flocks was evaluated between July and October 2011. Sampling kits were sent to 172 flock owners and returns were received from 91. Within this survey population, 27 flock owners used benzimidazole products, 10 used levamisole products, 15 used avermectin products, 26 used milbemycin products and 4 flock owners used the amino acetonitrile derivative, Monepantel. The remaining 9 flock owners used combination drenches (broad spectrum wormer plus fasciolicide). However, 15 sets of samples were ineligible for faecal egg count reduction testing due to either too low an egg count or insufficient faecal volume. Treatment efficacy below 95%, indicating significant resistance, was detected in 81% (n=24) of flocks tested for benzimidazole resistance; in 14% (n=1) of flocks tested for levamisole resistance; and in 50% (n=7) and 62% (n=13) of flocks tested for avermectin and milbemycin resistance, respectively. Monepantel resistance was absent in all (n=3) flocks tested. Combination products (broad spectrum nematocide plus flukicide) containing levamisole were entirely effective, while treatment efficacy below 95% was detected in 60% (n=3) of flocks where the nematocide in the combination product was a benzimidazole. Where parasite identification based on coproculture was completed, Trichostrongylus was the dominant genus detected in all cases post-treatment, indicating the occurrence of anthelmintic-resistant Trichostrongylus spp. populations. Benzimidazole efficacy was highest in treating Trichostrongylus spp. (51%) and lowest when treating Teladorsagia spp. Levamisole was 100% effective in treating Cooperia, but ineffective (0%) in treating Trichostrongylus spp. Avermectin efficacy was highest when treating Haemonchus contortus (100%) and Teladorsagia spp. (73%), with a marginally lower efficacy against Trichostrongylus spp. (71%). Moxidectin efficacy was 33% against Trichostrongylus spp., 68% against Teladorsagia spp., 97% against Cooperia spp. and 100% against Haemonchus contortus infections.
    Veterinary Parasitology 01/2013; · 2.55 Impact Factor
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  • Journal of Equine Veterinary Science 10/2012; 32(10):S33–S34. · 0.62 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Equine Veterinary Science 10/2012; 32(10):S34–S35. · 0.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The anthelmintic sensitivity of two field-derived isolates (designated FI001 and FI004) of cattle nematodes from beef farms in Scotland were investigated in a controlled efficacy test (CET). Efficacies of ivermectin pour-on (IVM-PO), IVM injectable (IVM-INJ) and moxidectin pour-on (MOX-PO) formulations were assessed. In each group, five helminth-naïve calves were infected experimentally with 50,000 third stage larvae from either isolate and administered with anthelmintic at the manufacturers' recommended dose rate 28 days later. For each isolate, nematode burdens were compared between treatment and control groups to determine efficacy. Nematode species composition, based on data derived from the untreated control groups' burden estimations, were 39 and 14% Cooperia oncophora and 61 and 86% Ostertagia ostertagi for isolates FI001 and FI004, respectively. Macrocyclic lactone resistance in C. oncophora was confirmed for both FI001 and FI004 isolates. Efficacies (as determined by nematode burden analysis) of 4, 21 and 31% for FI001, and 10, 1 and 74% for FI004, were obtained for IVM-INJ, IVM-PO and MOX-PO, respectively. Efficacy based on faecal egg count reduction at seven days post anthelmintic administration were 8, 99 and 100% for FI001, and 37, 20 and 100% for FI004 for IVM-INJ, IVM-PO and MOX-PO, respectively. In summary, this study details two macrocyclic lactone resistant isolates of C. oncophora obtained from cattle from two distinct geographical locales in the UK.
    Veterinary Parasitology 07/2012; · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anthelmintics in the absence of vaccines have underpinned a parasite control strategy for over 50 years. However, the continued development of anthelmintic resistance (AR) threatens this control. Measuring early AR is difficult as there many routes that resistance can arise from within multi-nematode populations operating complex metabolism capabilities coupled to different drug management pressures. There is an urgent need to identify and measure early resistance in the field situation. Proteomic profiling of expressed soluble proteins offers a new approach to reveal a drug resistant phenotype within a complex protein pattern. The hypothesis under test was that established differences in drug response phenotypes between nematode isolates can also be measured in their comparative proteomes. As a case study, proteomic differences were measured between an ivermectin resistant and susceptible adult female Haemonchus contortus. Adult H. contortus females were extracted from the abomasa of six lambs. The nematodes had been maintained in the lambs as monospecific isolates of either ivermectin susceptible or ivermectin resistant worms. Comparative analysis of the soluble proteome was completed along with immuno-proteomic analysis using pooled infection sera from the lambs. Following image analysis, spots of interest were excised and analysed by peptide mass fingerprinting and the proteins putatively identified using BLAST. Overall, a relative increase in the expression of proteins involved in the detoxification metabolic area was observed in the resistant isolate. In addition, Western blotting analysis also revealed differences in immuno-reactivity profiles between resistant and susceptible isolates. It can be concluded from this study that proteomic differences can be detectable between ivermectin susceptible and a resistant isolates of H. contortus, which could be further explored using other isolates to confirm if proteomic based fingerprinting offers molecular phenotyping or a new panel of resistance biomarkers.
    Veterinary Parasitology 06/2012; 190(1-2):104-13. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the efficacy of a combined formulation (Startect(®) Dual Active Oral Solution for Sheep, Pfizer Animal Health) of derquantel (DQL) and abamectin (ABA) for the treatment of: (1) sheep experimentally infected with a moxidectin (MOX)-resistant isolate of Teladorsagia circumcincta, and (2) multi-drug resistant gastrointestinal nematode parasites under UK field conditions. In the first study, a total of 40 animals were allocated into 4 treatment groups, and were either left untreated or treated with DQL+ABA, MOX or ABA. Faecal samples were collected on days 1-5 and on day 7 after treatment to examine the reduction in faecal egg excretion and to evaluate the egg viability. On day 14 post treatment all animals were euthanised for abomasal worm counts. There was a 100% reduction in geometric mean worm counts for the DQL+ABA treated animals compared to the untreated control animals (P<0.0001), whereas the percentage reduction in worm counts for the MOX- (P>0.05) and ABA-treated (P=0.0004) animals was 12.4% and 71.8%, respectively. The data from the egg hatch assay (EHA) indicated that in the MOX-treated and the ABA-treated animals, the majority of the eggs hatched after treatment. In the field study, performed on four farms, animals were allocated into 6 groups of 11-15 animals each in order to conduct a faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT), based on arithmetic mean egg counts. One group of animals remained untreated, whereas the other animals were treated with DQL+ABA, MOX, fenbendazole (FBZ), levamisole (LV) or ivermectin (IVM). On each of the farms the reduction in egg excretion after treatment with FBZ, LV or IVM was below 95.0%, indicating anthelmintic resistance. The efficacy of DQL+ABA ranged from 99.1 to 100%, yielding significantly lower egg counts compared to the untreated control group (P≤0.003). For MOX the egg counts were significantly (P≤0.003) lower compared to the untreated group at each farm, with reductions varying from 98.2 to 100%. The post-treatment copro-cultures for larva identification indicated that T. circumcincta was the most abundant worm species after treatment (52-99% of the larvae). The results of these studies confirm the high efficacy of the DQL+ABA combination formulation against anthelmintic resistant nematodes in the UK.
    Veterinary Parasitology 04/2012; 189(2-4):308-16. · 2.55 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

545 Citations
90.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2013
    • Moredun Research Institute
      • Department of Parasitology
      Penicuik, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • 2012
    • Aberystwyth University
      • Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences
      Aberystwyth, WLS, United Kingdom
  • 2008
    • The University of Edinburgh
      • Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies
      Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom