M A Juárez-Oropeza

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, The Federal District, Mexico

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Publications (58)81.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: The early detection of glucose metabolism impairment is a very important goal, mainly in individuals with a family history of diabetes (FHD) or in those with borderline insulin resistance (BIR: HOMA-IR > 2.0). Aims/hypothesis: To document the differences in glucose metabolism between healthy subjects with and without FHD and with BIR, in response to a maximal exercise test in both fasting and postprandial conditions. Methods: Twenty nine healthy and physically active subjects (15 female and 14 male) volunteered to participate in three maximal exercise tests, in fasting and postprandial states. Maximal O2 consumption, heart rate, blood pressure, anthropometry, glucose (basal and after exercise), and insulin measurements were obtained. Results: glycemia diminished at the end of maximal exercise and decreased the most in FHD and/or HOMA-IR > 2.0 compared to without FHD and/or HOMA-IR < 2.0. Recovery of post-exercise glycemia was slower in subjects with FHD and HOMA-IR > 2.0. Conclusions: the maximal exercise test in fasting or postprandial conditions proved to detect glucose metabolism differences between subjects with vs. without FHD and with vs. without BIR.
    Experimental and clinical cardiology 06/2014; 20(6):139-161. · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the actions of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on rats with a cholesterol-rich diet (HD) and high doses of atorvastatin (ATV, 0.2, 0.56 or 1.42 mg/day). Two experiments were done, the first one without coenzyme Q10 supplementation. On the second experiment all groups received coenzyme Q10 0.57 mg/day as supplement. After a 6-week treatment animals were sacrificed, blood and liver were analyzed and liver mitochondria were isolated and its oxygen consumption was evaluated in state 3 (phosphorylating state) and state 4 (resting state) in order to calculate the respiratory control (RC). HD increased serum and hepatic cholesterol levels in rats with or without CoQ10. ATV reduced these values but CoQ10 improved even more serum and liver cholesterol. Triacylglycerols (TAG) were also lower in blood and liver of rats with ATV + CoQ10. HDL-C decreased in HD rats. Treatment with ATV maintained HDL-C levels. However, these values were lower in HD + CoQ10 compared to control diet (CD) + CoQ10. RC was lessened in liver mitochondria of HD. The administration of ATV increased RC. All groups supplemented with CoQ10 showed an increment in RC. In conclusion, the combined administration of ATV and CoQ10 improved biochemical parameters, liver function and mitochondrial respiration in hypercholesterolemic rats. Our results suggest a potential beneficial effect of CoQ10 supplementation in hypercholesterolemic rats that also receive atorvastatin. This beneficial effect of CoQ10 must be combined with statin treatment in patient with high levels of cholesterol.
    Lipids in Health and Disease 01/2014; 13(1):22. · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: There is scarce and inconsistent information about gender-related differences in the hydration of sports persons, as well as about the effects of hydration on performance, especially during indoor sports. Objective: To determine the physiological differences between genders during in indoor physical exercise, with and without hydration. Methods: 21 spinning sportspeople (12 men and 9 women) participated in three controlled, randomly assigned and non-sequential hydration protocols, including no fluid intake and hydration with plain water or a sports drink (volume adjusted to each individual every 15 min), during 90 min of spinning exercise. The response variables included body mass, body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. Results: During exercise without hydration, men and women lost ~2% of body mass, and showed higher body temperature (~0.2°C), blood pressure (~4 mmHg) and heart rate (~7 beats/min) compared to exercises with hydration. Body temperature and blood pressure were higher for men than for women during exercise without hydration, differences not observed during exercise with hydration. Between 42-99% of variance in body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate could be explained by the physical characteristics of subjects and the work done. Conclusions: During exercise with hydration (either with water or sport drink), the physiological response was similar for both genders. Exercise without hydration produced physical stress, which could be prevented with either of the fluids (plain water was sufficient). Gender differences in the physiological response to spinning (body temperature, mean blood pressure and heart rate) can be explained in part by the distinct physical characteristics of each individual.
    Nutricion hospitalaria: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Nutricion Parenteral y Enteral 01/2014; 29(n03):644-651. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: End-ileostomy or colostomies are constructed for source control in patients with severe abdominal sepsis. After takedown, enterocutaneous fistula represents one of the most feared complications.
    Cirugia y cirujanos 09/2013; 81(5):394-9. · 0.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim. To evaluate the blood lactate ([La-]b) recovery kinetics and determinate the associations between the [La-]b recovery kinetics and physical capacity on physically active men. Methods: Seventeen healthy and physically active men took part in three recovery protocols (passive, cycling and walking), subsequent to a Wingate Anaerobic Test. The [La-]b was measured by a potentiometer-enzymatic analysis, the maximum O2 consumption (VO2max) using a metabolic cart, the heart rate by a heart rate monitor and the body mass from anthropometry. Results: Active recovery (walking and cycling recovery) had smaller peak [La-]b concentration time, [La-]b smaller area under the curve ([La-]b auc), and higher [La-]b removal (@2) than passive recovery. Moreover, the walking recovery had the smallest [La-]b accumulation final, the smallest [La-]b auc, and the highest [La-]b recovery index (p<0.05). The [La-]b recovery kinetics was depend on physical capacity of the subjects: during passive recovery >79% of the variance were explained by workload auc, muscle mass and lactate threshold (LT); during active recovery >73% of the variance were explained by age, muscle mass, VO2max and LT. Conclusion: The variations on [La-]b recovery kinetics depended principally by the subject’s physical capacity. The [La-]b recovery kinetics were more efficient during active than during passive recovery (walking > cycling > passive recovery).
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    ABSTRACT: Aim. To evaluate the blood lactate ([La-]b) recovery kinetics and determinate the associations between the [La-]b recovery kinetics and physical capacity on physically active men. Methods: Seventeen healthy and physically active men took part in three recovery protocols (passive, cycling and walking), subsequent to a Wingate Anaerobic Test. The [La-]b was measured by a potentiometer-enzymatic analysis, the maximum O2 consumption (VO2max) using a metabolic cart, the heart rate by a heart rate monitor and the body mass from anthropometry. Results: Active recovery (walking and cycling recovery) had smaller peak [La-]b concentration time, [La-]b smaller area under the curve ([La-]b auc), and higher [La-]b removal (@2) than passive recovery. Moreover, the walking recovery had the smallest [La-]b accumulation final, the smallest [La-]b auc, and the highest [La-]b recovery index (p<0.05). The [La-]b recovery kinetics was depend on physical capacity of the subjects: during passive recovery >79% of the variance were explained by workload auc, muscle mass and lactate threshold (LT); during active recovery >73% of the variance were explained by age, muscle mass, VO2max and LT. Conclusion: The variations on [La-]b recovery kinetics depended principally by the subject’s physical capacity. The [La-]b recovery kinetics were more efficient during active than during passive recovery (walking > cycling > passive).
    Archivio per le scienze mediche 05/2013; 172(5):342-350.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the blood lactate ([La-]b) recovery kinetics and determinate the associations between the [La-]b recovery kinetics and physical capacity on physically active men. Methods: Seventeen healthy and physically active men took part in three recovery protocols (passive, cycling and walking), subsequent to a Wingate Anaerobic Test. The [La-]b was measured by a potentiometer-enzymatic analysis, the maximum O2 consumption (VO2max) using a metabolic cart, the heart rate by a heart rate monitor and the body mass from anthropometry. Results: Active recovery (walking and cycling recovery) had smaller peak [La-]b concentration time, [La-]b smaller area under the curve ([La-]b auc), and higher [La-]b removal (γ2) than passive recovery. Moreover, the walking recovery had the smallest [La-]b accumulation final, the smallest [La-]b auc, and the highest [La-]b recovery index (p<0.05). The [La-]b recovery kinetics was depend on physical capacity of the subjects: during passive recovery >79% of the variance were explained by workload auc, muscle mass and lactate threshold (LT); during active recovery >73% of the variance were explained by age, muscle mass, VO2max and LT. Conclusion: The variations on [La-]b recovery kinetics depended principally by the subject’s physical capacity. The [La-]b recovery kinetics were more efficient during active than during passive recovery (walking >cycling >passive recovery).
    Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio Per Le Scienze Mediche. 04/2013; 172(5):342.
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    ABSTRACT: Trained people exhibit low plasma concentrations of triacylglcyerols in both fasting and postprandial states. Exercise practice is commonly believed to improve postprandial lipemia. In addition, elevated postprandial lipemia is an indicator of poor lipid clearance, and it has been associated with atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, and obesity. Spirulina maxima is an edible microorganism with a high nutritional value. When it is consumed, beneficial properties to health have been demonstrated, such as hypolipemic and antihypertensive properties in human beings. This work evaluates the effects of orally administrated S. maxima on postprandial lipemia in a young Mexican sporting population after 15 days of consumption, as a possible alternative treatment to improve their lipid clearance. Forty-one runners (10-26 years old; 21 men and 20 women) volunteered to participate in the study. All of them were physically active for at least 1 year before the study and were not undergoing training during the study. The subjects consumed 5 g of Spirulina during 15 days. Before and after the treatment with Spirulina, they consumed (12 h fasting) a standardized meal with high fat content (53.2% total calories). Postprandial lipemia was measured at 1.5, 3, and 4.5 h after the fatty meal. Fasting plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations were lower after Spirulina treatment than before treatment. In addition, the postprandial area under the curve of TAG concentrations was lower after the treatment with Spirulina. Sixty-two percent of the youngest runners (10-16 years) studied exhibited the best response to the treatment. Orally administered S. maxima decreased postprandial lipemia in sporting teenagers. The youngest people were the most responsive to the beneficial effects of Spirulina on postprandial lipemia.
    Journal of medicinal food 06/2012; 15(8):753-7. · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is generally accepted that electromagnetic fields (EMF) can exert biological effects; however, the mechanisms by which EMF elicits responses are still unknown. The present study was designed to assess the immediate effects of acute EMF exposure, movement restriction, and the combination of both on the antioxidant systems and lipid content in the whole brain of rat. Thirty two male Wistar rats were arranged in four groups: control, EMF exposed, movement restrained (MR), and EMF + MR for 2 h. Rats were then sacrificed and their brains analyzed for superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide, total cholesterol, and triacylglycerol levels, as well as plasma corticosterone concentrations. Acute exposure to EMF induces reduction in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, whereas the combination of EMF + MR also decreases both reduced glutathione and nitric oxide levels. Our results show that the acute exposure to EMF does not induce elevation of stress-hormone corticosterone but impairs the antioxidant status in rat brain. Plasma corticosterone concentration and antioxidant data indicate that the acute exposure to EMF appears to be a mild stressor that leads to some adaptive responses due to the activation of systems controlling the brain oxidative balance.
    Archives of medical research 05/2012; 43(3):183-9. · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many enterocutaneous fistulas (ECF) require operative treatment. Despite recent advances, rates of recurrence have not changed substantially. This study aims to determine factors associated with recurrence and mortality in patients submitted to surgical repair of ECF. Consecutive patients submitted to surgical repair of ECF during a 5-year period were studied. Several patient, disease, and operative variables were assessed as factors related to recurrence and mortality through univariate and multivariate analysis. There were 35 male and 36 female patients. Median age was 52 years (range, 17-81). ECF recurred in 22 patients (31%), 18 of them (82%) eventually closed with medical and/or surgical treatment. Univariate analyses disclosed noncolonic ECF origin (p = 0.04), high output (p = 0.001), and nonresective surgical options (p = 0.02) as risk factors for recurrence; the latter two remained significant after multivariate analyses. A total of 14 patients died (20%). Univariate analyses revealed risk factors for mortality at diagnosis or referral including malnutrition (p = 0.03), sepsis (p = 0.004), fluid and electrolyte imbalance (p = 0.001), and serum albumin <3 g/dl (p = 0.02). Other significant variables were interval from last abdominal operation to ECF operative treatment ≤20 weeks (p = 0.03), preoperative serum albumin <3 g/dl (p = 0.001), and age ≥55 years (p = 0.03); the latter two remained significant after multivariate analyses. Interestingly, recurrence after surgical treatment was not associated with mortality (p = 0.75). Among several studied variables, recurrence was only independently associated with high output and type of surgical treatment (operations not involving resection of ECF). Interestingly, once ECF recurred its management was as successful as non-recurrent fistulas in our series. Mortality was associated to previously-reported bad prognostic factors at diagnosis or referral.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery 01/2012; 16(1):156-63; discussion 163-4. · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Atherosclerosis Supplements 06/2011; 12(1):123-124. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the early effects of acute (2 h) exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), as well as movement restraint (MR) and the combination of both on the antioxidant systems in the plasma, liver, kidney, and heart of rats. Twenty-four adult male Wistar rats were divided in two groups, restrained and unrestrained. The restrained animals were confined into an acrylic tube for 120 min. Half of the animals of each group were exposed to ELF-EMF (60 Hz, 2.4 mT) during the period of restriction. Immediately after treatment, reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in tissues. GSH concentration was significantly lower in the heart of all experimental animals when compared to the control group; furthermore, the decrease was higher in the liver of restrained animals. SOD activity was lower in the plasma of restrained and EMF exposed animals compared to unrestrained rats. There were no significant differences in CAT activity and TBARS levels among all the experimental groups vs. the control group. Two hours of 60 Hz EMF exposure might immediately alter the metabolism of free radicals, decreasing SOD activity in plasma and GSH content in heart and kidney, but does not induce immediate lipid peroxidation. Oxidative stress induced by movement restraint was stronger than that produced by EMF.
    International Journal of Radiation Biology 12/2010; 86(12):1088-94. · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases range from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The "two hits" hypothesis is widely accepted for its pathogenesis: the first hit is an increased fat flux to the liver, which predisposes our patient to a second hit where increasing free fatty acid oxidation into the mitochondria leads to oxidative stress, lipoperoxidation and a chain reaction with increased ROS. Clinical indications include abdominal cramps, meteorism and fatigue. Most patients, however, are asymptomatic, and diagnosis is based on aminotransferase elevation and ultrasonography (or "brilliant liver"). Spirulina maxima has been experimentally proven to possess in vivo and in vitro hepatoprotective properties by maintaining the liver lipid profile. This case report evaluates the hepatoprotective effects of orally supplied Spirulina maxima. Three Hispanic Mexican patients (a 43-year-old man, a 77-year-old man and a 44-year-old woman) underwent ultrasonography and were treated with 4.5 g/day of Spirulina maxima for three months. Their blood samples before and after the treatment determined triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The results were assessed using ultrasound. Treatment had therapeutic effects as evidenced by ultrasonography and the aminotransferase data. Hypolipidemic effects were also shown. We conclude that Spirulina maxima may be considered an alternative treatment for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases and dyslipidemic disorder.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 04/2010; 4:103.
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    ABSTRACT: Oxidative damage has been proposed as a possible mechanism involved in lead toxicity, specially affecting the liver and kidney. Previous studies have shown the antioxidant effect of Spirulina maxima in several experimental models of oxidative stress. The current study was carried out to evaluate the antioxidant activity of Spirulina maxima against lead acetate-induced hyperlipidemia and oxidative damage in the liver and kidney of male rats. Control animals were fed on a standard diet and did not receive lead acetate (Control group). Experimental animals were fed on a standard laboratory diet with or without Spirulina maxima 5% in the standard laboratory diet and treated with three doses of lead acetate (25 mg each/weekly, intraperitoneal injection) (lead acetate with Spirulina, and lead acetate without Spirulina groups). The results showed that Spirulina maxima prevented the lead acetate-induced significant changes on plasma and liver lipid levels and on the antioxidant status of the liver and kidney. On the other hand, Spirulina maxima succeeded to improve the biochemical parameters of the liver and kidney towards the normal values of the Control group. It was concluded that Spirulina maxima has protective effects on lead acetate-induced damage, and that the effects are associated with the antioxidant effect of Spirulina.
    Lipids in Health and Disease 03/2010; 9:35. · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter released by the vagus nerve that binds to the muscarinic M2 receptor of heart pacemaker cells. Ligand-receptor binding releases a beta-gamma dimmer from the G protein. This dimmer remains anchored to the inner surface of the plasma membrane, exerting a fast, direct, membrane delimited action that does not require phosphorylation of K+ channels. These channels, initially called K (Ach), produce a slow depolarization of the pacemaker cell, decreasing the heart rate. In addition, acetylcholine initiates and maintains slow modulation mechanisms that require soluble intracellular messengers, activation of kinases and phosphorylation. We also review the adrenergic action, complementary and antagonistic to cholinergic response.
    Revista de Educación Bioquímica. 01/2010; 29(2):29-38.
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    ABSTRACT: Hatha Yoga (HY) can be an alternative to improve physical activity in middle-aged and older women. However, conventional HY (CHY) exercising may not result in enough training stimulus to improve cardiovascular fitness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intensive HY intervention (IHY) on cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged and older women from Northern Mexico. In this prospective quasiexperimental design, four middle-aged and nine older CHY practicing females (yoginis) were enrolled into an 11-week IHY program consisting of 5 sessions/week for 90 min (55 sessions). The program adherence, asana performance, and work intensity were assessed along the intervention. Anthropometric [body mass index (BMI), % body fat and Σ skin folds], cardiovascular fitness [maximal expired air volume (VE(max)), maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2max)), maximal heart rate (HR(max)), systolic (BPs) and diastolic blood pressure (BPd)], biochemical [glucose, triacylglycerols (TAG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)], and dietary parameters were evaluated before and after IHY. Daily caloric intake (~1,916 kcal/day), program adherence (~85%), and exercising skills (asana performance) were similar in both middle-aged and older women. The IHY program did not modify any anthropometric measurements. However, it increased VO(2max) and VE(max) and HDL-C while TAG and LDL-C remained stable in both middle-aged and older groups (P < 0.01). The proposed IHY program improves different cardiovascular risk factors (namely VO(2max) and HDL-C) in middle-aged and older women.
    International Journal of Yoga 07/2009; 2(2):49-54.
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    ABSTRACT: There are several reports suggesting that Spirulina (Arthrospira) may have a beneficial effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Here we review the results of studies on the effects of dietary Spirulina on the vasomotor reactivity of aortic rings excised from either lean or obese Wistar rats. We also review preliminary results on the effects of Spirulina intake on plasma lipids and blood pressure in humans. The results of the former studies strongly suggest that Spirulina induces a tone-related increase in the synthesis/release of nitric oxide by the endothelium as well as an increase in the synthesis/release of a vasodilating cyclooxygenase-dependent metabolite of arachidonic acid and/or a decrease in the synthesis/release of a vasoconstricting eicosanoid by the endothelium. In humans, Spirulina maxima intake decreases blood pressure and plasma lipid concentrations, especially triacylglycerols and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and indirectly modifies the total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol values.
    Journal of medicinal food 03/2009; 12(1):15-20. · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Hatha Yoga (HY) can be an alternative to improve physical activity in middle- aged and older women. However, conventional HY (CHY) exercising may not result in enough training stimulus to improve cardiovascular fitness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intensive HY intervention (IHY) on cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged and older women from Northern Mexico. Materials and Methods: In this prospective quasiexperimental design, four middle-aged and nine older CHY practicing females (yoginis) were enrolled into an 11-week IHY program consisting of 5 sessions/week for 90 min (55 sessions). The program adherence, asana performance, and work intensity were assessed along the intervention. Anthropometric [body mass index (BMI), % body fat and ∑ skin folds], cardiovascular fitness [maximal expired air volume (VE<sub> max</sub> ), maximal O<sub> 2</sub> consumption (VO<sub> 2max</sub> ), maximal heart rate (HR<sub> max</sub> ), systolic (BPs) and diastolic blood pressure (BPd)], biochemical [glucose, triacylglycerols (TAG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)], and dietary parameters were evaluated before and after IHY . Results: Daily caloric intake (~1,916 kcal/day), program adherence (~85%), and exercising skills ( asana performance) were similar in both middle-aged and older women. The IHY program did not modify any anthropometric measurements. However, it increased VO<sub> 2max </sub> and VE<sub> max</sub> and HDL-C while TAG and LDL-C remained stable in both middle-aged and older groups ( P < 0.01). Conclusions: The proposed IHY program improves different cardiovascular risk factors (namely VO<sub> 2max</sub> and HDL-C) in middle-aged and older women.
    International Journal of Yoga. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: GLUT-4 is the major glucose transporter-isoform, expressed in skeletal muscle, and it is translocated from the intracellular location to the plasma membrane and T tubules. Translocation of GLUT-4 is the principal mechanism through both, insulin and exercise, increase skeletal muscle glucose-transport. GLUT-4 settles intracellular in small-vesicle pool and by the activation of diverse intracellular mechanisms (the majority unknown), these vesicles are translocated to the cytoplasmic membrane, and by exocytosis the glucose transporters (GLUT-4) are integrated into cellular membrane, allowing the glucose uptake. In this work, are described diverse mechanisms that permit the GLUT-4 to increase its intracellular concentrations, translocating to the sarcoplasma, and settle in the membrane and to promote the glucose uptake. In addition, it will be mentioned the mechanisms activated by the exercise in these processes.
    Revista de Educación Bioquímica. 01/2009; 28(4):115-124.

Publication Stats

390 Citations
81.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1995–2013
    • Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
      • • School of Medicine
      • • Department of Physiology
      • • Department of Embriology
      Ciudad de México, The Federal District, Mexico
  • 2009
    • Alfa Institute of Biomedical Sciences
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2008
    • Autonomous University of Chihuahua
      Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico
    • Hospital Juarez De Mexico
      Villa Juarez, Nuevo León, Mexico
  • 2001–2002
    • Mexican Institute of Social Security
      Ciudad de México, The Federal District, Mexico
  • 1999
    • División Académica de Ciencias Biológicas UJAT
      Garcia de la Cadena, Zacatecas, Mexico
  • 1987
    • University of Pennsylvania
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States