Wendy E. Mackay

University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States

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Publications (136)3.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Contemporary music composition is a highly creative and disciplined activity that requires free expression of ideas and sophisticated computer programming. This paper presents a technique for structured observation of expert creative behavior, as well as Polyphony, a novel interface for systematically studying all phases of computer-aided composition. Polyphony is a unified user interface that integrates interactive paper and electronic user interfaces for composing music. It supports fluid transitions between informal sketches and formal computer-based representations. We asked 12 composers to use Polyphony to compose an electronic accompaniment to a 20-second instrumental composition by Anton Webern. All successfully created a complete, original composition in an hour and found the task challenging but fun. The resulting dozen comparable snapshots of the composition process reveal how composers both adapt and appropriate tools in their own way.
    06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Effectively planning a large multi-track conference requires an understanding of the preferences and constraints of organizers, authors, and attendees. Traditionally, the onus of scheduling the program falls on a few dedicated organizers. Resolving conflicts becomes difficult due to the size and complexity of the schedule and the lack of insight into community members' needs and desires. Cobi presents an alternative approach to conference scheduling that engages the entire community in the planning process. Cobi comprises (a) communitysourcing applications that collect preferences, constraints, and affinity data from community members, and (b) a visual scheduling interface that combines communitysourced data and constraint-solving to enable organizers to make informed improvements to the schedule. This paper describes Cobi's scheduling tool and reports on a live deployment for planning CHI 2013, where organizers considered input from 645 authors and resolved 168 scheduling conflicts. Results show the value of integrating community input with an intelligent user interface to solve complex planning tasks.
    Proceedings of the 26th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology; 10/2013
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents Arpège, a progressive multitouch input technique for learning chords, as well as a robust recognizer and guidelines for building large chord vocabularies. Experiment one validated our design guidelines and suggests implications for designing vocabularies, i.e. users prefer relaxed to tense chords, chords with fewer fingers and chords with fewer tense fingers. Experiment two demonstrated that users can learn and remember a large chord vocabulary with both Arpège and cheat sheets, and Arpège encourages the creation of effective mmnemonics.
    Proceedings of the 2013 ACM international conference on Interactive tabletops and surfaces; 10/2013
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    ABSTRACT: As computing environments that combine multiple displays and input devices become more common, the need for applications that take advantage of these capabilities becomes more pressing. However, few applications are designed to support such multi-surface environments. We investigate how to adapt existing applications without access to their source code. We introduce HydraScope, a framework for transforming existing web applications into meta-applications that execute and synchronize multiple copies of applications in parallel, with a multi-user input layer for interacting with it. We describe the Hydra-Scope architecture, validated with five meta-applications.
    Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays; 06/2013
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    ABSTRACT: There are many visions that touch on the future of human computer interaction from a trans-human future to a post-technological UI. However visions related to the progress of technology are not new. Creative and insightful visionaries from Denis Diderot to Vannevar Bush have been postulating visions of possible futures or technology for centuries. Some idealised views end up discredited with advances in knowledge, while others now appear remarkably prescient. The question is, do visions and the process of creating them have a place in CHI, or are they simply flights of fancy? This SIG meeting provides a forum for visionaries; researchers and practitioners looking to consider the place and importance of visions within CHI. Can visions, the process of visioning and forming new visions help us refine, advance or develop new research or forms of interaction. And if visions are important to us, then are they part of the regular academic process? If so, should CHI provide venues for publishing new visions?
    CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems; 04/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Creating a good schedule for a large conference such as CHI requires taking into account the preferences and constraints of organizers, authors, and attendees. Traditionally, the onus of planning is placed entirely on the organizers and involves only a few individuals. Cobi presents an alternative approach to conference scheduling that engages the entire community to take active roles in the planning process. The Cobi system consists of a collection of crowdsourcing applications that elicit preferences and constraints from the community, and software that enable organizers and other community members to take informed actions toward improving the schedule based on collected information. We are currently piloting Cobi as part of the CHI 2013 planning process.
    CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems; 04/2013
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    ABSTRACT: CHI 2013 offers over 500 separate events including paper presentations, panels, courses, case studies and special interest groups. Given the size of the conference, it is no longer practical to host live summaries of these events. Instead, a 30-second Video Preview summary of each event is available. The CHI'13 Interactive Schedule helps attendees navigate this wealth of video content in order to identify events they would like to attend. It consists of a number of large display screens throughout the conference venue which cycle through a video playlist of events. Attendees can interact with these displays using their mobile devices by either constructing custom video playlists or adding on-screen content to their personal schedule.
    CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems; 04/2013
  • Proceedings of the 31st international conference on Human factors in computing systems; 01/2013
  • Julie Wagner, Wendy E. Mackay, Stéphane Huot
    10/2012;
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    IEEE Computer. 04/2012;
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    Julie Wagner, Stéphane Huot, Wendy E Mackay
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the demonstrated benefits of bimanual interaction, most tablets use just one hand for interaction, to free the other for support. In a preliminary study, we identified five holds that permit simultaneous support and interaction, and noted that users frequently change position to combat fatigue. We then designed the BiTouch design space, which introduces a support function in the kinematic chain model for interacting with hand-held tablets, and developed BiPad, a toolkit for creating bimanual tablet interaction with the thumb or the fingers of the supporting hand. We ran a controlled experiment to explore how tablet orientation and hand position affect three novel techniques: bimanual taps, gestures and chords. Bimanual taps outperformed our one-handed control condition in both landscape and portrait orientations; bimanual chords and gestures in portrait mode only; and thumbs outperformed fingers, but were more tiring and less stable. Together, BiTouch and BiPad offer new opportunities for designing bimanual interaction on hand-held tablets.
    Proceedings of the 30th international conference on Human factors in computing systems; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Augmented Reality (AR) has been proved useful to guide operational tasks in professional domains by reducing the shift of attention between instructions and physical objects. Modern smartphones make it possible to use such techniques in everyday tasks, but raise new challenges for the usability of AR in this context: small screen, occlusion, operation "through a lens". We address these problems by adding real-time feedback to the AR overlay. We conducted a controlled experiment comparing AR with and without feedback, and with standard textual and graphical instructions. Results show significant benefits for mobile AR with feedback and reveals some problems with the other techniques.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We present paper substrates, interactive paper components that support the creation and manipulation of complex musical data. Substrates take different forms, from whole pages to movable strips, and contain or control typed data representations. We conducted participatory design sessions with five professional musicians with extensive experience with music creation tools. All generated innovative uses of paper substrates, manipulating their data, linking multiple representation layers and creating modular, reusable paper elements. The substrates reflect the structure of their computer-based data, but in a much more flexible and adaptable form. We use their prototypes to provide concrete examples of substrates, identify their roles, properties and functions. Finally, we explore their physical and interaction design with an interactive prototype.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: The WILD (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) room serves as a testbed for exploring the next generation of interactive systems by distributing interaction across diverse computing devices, enabling multiple users to easily and seamlessly create, share, and manipulate digital content. The featured Web extra is a video of Michel Beaudouin-Lafon and his colleagues demonstrating how the WILD (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) room lets users view, explore, manipulate large amounts of digital content.
    Computer 01/2012; 45(4):48-56. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Personal Information Management in conjunction with the 2012 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work; 01/2012
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    Louis Bigot, Antoine Spicher, Wendy E. Mackay
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    ABSTRACT: A Tonnetz, or "tone-network" in German, is a two-dimensional representation of the relationships among musical pitches. In this paper, we present PaperTonnetz, a tool that lets musicians explore and compose music with Tonnetz representations by making gestures on interactive paper. In addition to triggering musical notes with the pen as a button based-interface, the drawn gestures become interactive paths that can be used as chords or melodies to support composition.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This article introduces runtime toolkit overloading, a novel approach to help third-party developers modify the interaction and behavior of existing software applications without access to their underlying source code. We describe the abstractions provided by this approach as well as the mechanisms for implementing them in existing environments. We describe Scotty, a prototype implementation for Mac OS X Cocoa that enables developers to modify existing applications at runtime, and we demonstrate a collection of interaction and functional transformations on existing off-the-shelf applications. We show how Scotty helps a developer make sense of unfamiliar software, even without access to its source code. We further discuss what features of future environments would facilitate this kind of runtime software development.
    Proceedings of the 24th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Santa Barbara, CA, USA, October 16-19, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates how Wikibooks authors collaborate to create high-quality books. We combined Information Retrieval and statistical techniques to examine the complete multi-year lifecycle of over 50 high-quality Wikibooks. We found that: 1. The presence of redundant material is negatively correlated with collaboration mechanisms; 2. For most books, over 50% of the content is written by a small core of authors; and 3. Use of collaborative tools (predicted pages and talk pages) is significantly correlated with patterns of redundancy. Non-redundant books are well-planned from the beginning and require fewer talk pages to reach high-quality status. Initially redundant books begin with high redundancy, which drops as soon as authors use coordination tools to restructure the content. Suddenly redundant books display sudden bursts of redundancy that must be resolved, requiring significantly more discussion to reach high-quality status. These findings suggest that providing core authors with effective tools for visualizing and removing redundant material may increase writing speed and improve the book's ultimate quality.
    Human-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2011 - 13th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Lisbon, Portugal, September 5-9, 2011, Proceedings, Part I; 01/2011
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    Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems; 01/2011

Publication Stats

3k Citations
3.46 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Texas at Austin
      Austin, Texas, United States
    • Stanford University
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 1999–2012
    • Aarhus University
      • Department of Computer Science
      Aarhus, Central Jutland, Denmark
  • 1998–2010
    • Université Paris-Sud 11
      • Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique
      Orsay, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • Wuhan University of Technology
      Wu-han-shih, Hubei, China
  • 1988–1991
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      • MIT Sloan School of Management
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States