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Publications (5)28.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A monoclonal antibody against prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) has emerged as a novel cancer therapy currently being tested in clinical trials for prostate and pancreatic cancers, but this treatment is likely to be efficient only in patients with PSCA-expressing tumors. The present study demonstrates that a genetic variant (rs2294008) discovered by bladder cancer genome-wide association studies is a strong predictor of PSCA protein expression in bladder tumors, as measured by two-sided multivariable linear regression (P = 6.46×10(-11); n = 278). The association pattern is similar in non-muscle-invasive tumors, stages Ta (P = 3.10×10(-5); n = 173) and T1 (P = 2.64×10(-5); n = 60), and muscle-invasive tumors, stages T2 (P =.01; n = 23) and T3/4 (P =.03; n = 22). The study suggests that anti-PSCA immunotherapy might be beneficial for bladder cancer patients with high tumor PSCA expression, which is statistically significantly associated with the presence of CT and TT genotypes of a common genetic variant, rs2294008. Future clinical studies will be needed to validate PSCA as a therapeutic target for bladder cancer.
    CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment 12/2012; · 14.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cell-cycle proteins are important predictive markers in urothelial carcinoma but may also exhibit exposure-specific heterogeneity. Tumor tissue from 491 bladder cancer cases enrolled in the Maine and Vermont component of the New England Bladder Cancer Study was assembled as tissue microarrays and examined for aberrant expression of p53, p63, p16, cyclin D1, Rb, and Ki-67. The association between expression and histopathology, demographics, and cigarette smoking was examined using χ(2) tests, multivariable Poisson, and multinomial regression models. We found that overexpression of p53 and Ki-67 was associated with high-stage/grade tumors [relative risk (RR), 1.26; P(trend) = 0.003; and RR, 3.21; P(trend) < 0.0001, respectively], whereas expression of p63 and p16 was decreased in high-stage/grade tumors (RR, 0.52; P(trend) < 0.0001; and RR, 0.88; P(trend) = 0.04, respectively). No significant aberrations of cell-cycle proteins were identified using various smoking variables and multiple statistical models. The results of this population-based study of histologically confirmed urothelial carcinomas show significant aberration of cell-cycle proteins p53, p63, p16, and Ki-67, but not Rb or cyclin D1. p53 showed the most significant heterogeneity with respect to tumor stage and grade, especially when stratified for different staining intensities using novel digital image analysis techniques. Our findings do not support that smoking modifies expression of cell-cycle proteins. Impact: Our study shows significant heterogeneity in the expression of key cell-cycle proteins that are associated with disease progression in bladder cancer. Further studies may lead to the identification of biomarkers and their multiplexed interactions as useful prognostic and therapeutic targets. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(9); 1555-64. ©2012 AACR.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 07/2012; 21(9):1555-64. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that global methylation levels in blood cell DNA may be a biomarker for cancer risk. To date, most studies have used genomic DNA isolated from blood or urine as a surrogate marker of global DNA methylation levels in bladder tumor tissue. A subset of 50 bladder cancer cases was selected from the New England Bladder Cancer Case-Control Study. Genomic DNA was isolated from buffy coat, buccal cells, serum, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue for each participant. DNA methylation at four CpG sites within the long interspersed nucleotide element (LINE-1) repetitive element was quantified using pyrosequencing and expressed as a mean methylation level across sites. Overall, the mean percent (%) LINE-1 5-methylcytosine (%5MeC) level was highest in serum (80.47% ± 1.44%) and lowest in bladder tumor DNA (61.36% ± 12.74%) and levels varied significantly across tissue types (P = 0.001). An inverse association between LINE-1 mean %5MeC and tumor stage (P = 0.001) and grade (P = 0.002) was observed. A moderate correlation between patient-matched serum and buffy coat DNA LINE-1 %5MeC levels was found (r = 0.32, P = 0.03) but levels were uncorrelated among other matched genomic DNA samples. The mean promoter LINE-1 %5MeC measurements were correlated between buffy coat and serum DNA samples. No correlation was observed between genomic DNA sources and tumor tissues; however a significant inverse association between tumor percent LINE-1 methylation and tumor stage/grade was found. LINE-1 methylation measured in case blood DNA did not reflect that observed in bladder tumor tissue but may represent other factors associated with carcinogenesis.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 04/2012; 21(7):1143-8. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Associations between bladder cancer risk and NAT2 and GSTM1 polymorphisms have emerged as some of the most consistent findings in the genetic epidemiology of common metabolic polymorphisms and cancer, but their interaction with tobacco use, intensity and duration remain unclear. In a New England population-based case-control study of urothelial carcinoma, we collected mouthwash samples from 1088 of 1171 cases (92.9%) and 1282 of 1418 controls (91.2%) for genotype analysis of GSTM1, GSTT1 and NAT2 polymorphisms. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of bladder cancer among New England Bladder Cancer Study subjects with one or two inactive GSTM1 alleles (i.e. the 'null' genotype) were 1.26 (0.85-1.88) and 1.54 (1.05-2.25), respectively (P-trend = 0.008), compared with those with two active copies. GSTT1 inactive alleles were not associated with risk. NAT2 slow acetylation status was not associated with risk among never (1.04; 0.71-1.51), former (0.95; 0.75-1.20) or current smokers (1.33; 0.91-1.95); however, a relationship emerged when smoking intensity was evaluated. Among slow acetylators who ever smoked at least 40 cigarettes/day, risk was elevated among ever (1.82; 1.14-2.91, P-interaction = 0.07) and current heavy smokers (3.16; 1.22-8.19, P-interaction = 0.03) compared with rapid acetylators in each category; but was not observed at lower intensities. In contrast, the effect of GSTM1-null genotype was not greater among smokers, regardless of intensity. Meta-analysis of the NAT2 associations with bladder cancer showed a highly significant relationship. Findings from this large USA population-based study provided evidence that the NAT2 slow acetylation genotype interacts with tobacco smoking as a function of exposure intensity.
    Carcinogenesis 10/2010; 32(2):182-9. · 5.64 Impact Factor