Ju-Wei Hsu

National Yang Ming University, T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan

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Publications (28)83.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both frequently comorbid with other psychiatric disorders, but the comorbid effect of ASD and ADHD relative to the comorbid risk of other psychiatric disorders is still unknown. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 725 patients with ASD-alone, 5694 with ADHD-alone, 466 with ASD + ADHD, and 27,540 (1:4) age-/gender-matched controls were enrolled in our study. The risk of psychiatric comorbidities was investigated. The ADHD + ASD group had the greatest risk of developing schizophrenia (hazard ratio [HR]: 95.89; HR: 13.73; HR: 174.61), bipolar disorder (HR: 74.93; HR: 19.42; HR: 36.71), depressive disorder (HR: 17.66; HR: 12.29; HR: 9.05), anxiety disorder (HR: 49.49; HR: 50.92; HR: 14.12), disruptive behavior disorder (HR: 113.89; HR: 93.87; HR: 26.50), and tic disorder (HR: 8.95; HR: 7.46; HR: 4.87) compared to the ADHD-alone, ASD-alone, and control groups. Patients with ADHD + ASD were associated with the greatest risk of having comorbid bipolar disorder, depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, disruptive behavior disorder, and tic disorder. The diagnoses of ASD and ADHD preceded the diagnoses of other psychiatric comorbidities. A comprehensive interview scrutinizing the psychiatric comorbidities would be suggested when encountering and following patients with both ASD and ADHD in clinical practice.
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 11/2014; · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies showed that both attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) were associated separately with a higher risk of allergic diseases. However, the comorbid effect of ADHD and ASD on the risk of allergic diseases is still unknown. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 5386 children aged less than 18 years with ADHD alone, 578 with ASD alone, 458 with ADHD + ASD, and 25,688 non-ADHD/ASD age- and sex-matched (1:4) controls were enrolled in our study. The prevalence of allergic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and allergic conjunctivitis, was evaluated among the four groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that the ADHD + ASD group (odds ratio [OR]: 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.83–2.79), ADHD-alone group (OR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.70–1.93), and ASD-alone group (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.04–1.48) had an increased risk of allergic comorbidities compared to the control after adjusting age, sex, and level of urbanization. ASD children with more allergic comorbidities (≧3: OR: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.74–3.79; 2: OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 1.41–2.84; 1: OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.16–2.22) were associated with a greater likelihood of ADHD. Children with ADHD or ASD had an increased risk of allergic comorbidities, and those with both ADHD and ASD had the highest. These results may inspire more research to clarify the underlying mechanisms among ASD, ADHD, and allergic diseases.
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 10/2014; 8(10):1333–1338. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Previous studies have found a temporal concordance in the increased prevalence of atopic diathesis/atopic diseases, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) worldwide. But, the temporal association among these 3 distinct diseases is unknown. Method 14,812 atopic subjects diagnosed with any atopic disease (asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, or allergic conjunctivitis) before the age of 3 (atopic cohort) and 6944 non-atopic subjects with no lifetime atopic disease (non-atopic cohort), born between 1997 and 2000, were enrolled and followed to December 31 2010 to identify the development of ADHD and ASD. Results The presence of any atopic disease in early childhood increased the risk of developing ADHD (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.97) and ASD (HR: 3.40) in later life. Greater numbers of atopic comorbidities (4 comorbidities: ADHD: HR: 2.53; ASD: HR: 4.29) were significantly related to a greater risk of developing ADHD and ASD. Discussion Atopic diathesis in early childhood elevated the risk of developing ADHD and ASD in later life, with the dose-dependent relationship of more atopic comorbidities with a greater likelihood of ADHD and ASD.
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research 10/2014; · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Personal and Social Performance (PSP) scale is used for the assessment of patient function by mental health professionals. This study aimed to evaluate the internal reliability and validity of a self-reported graphic version of the PSP (SRG-PSP) scale and its correlations with psychiatric symptoms, daily life ability and quality of life.
    Schizophrenia Research 09/2014; · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Both atopic dermatitis and epilepsy have been regarded as chronic inflammatory diseases. However, their association has yet to be investigated.
    Epilepsia 06/2014; · 3.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neonatal jaundice may cause the lifelong sequelae of central nerve system developmental disorders. However, the results are inconsistent. 2016 newborns with neonatal jaundice and 8064 age-/gender-matched (1:4) controls were enrolled during 1999–2000. Participants of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and other developmental disorders that occurred during the follow-up were identified. Newborns with neonatal jaundice had increased risks of developing ASD (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–2.90), any developmental delay (HR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.02–1.58), and developmental speech or language disorder (HR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.11–1.79). Newborn exposure to hyperbilirubinemia was related to the increased risk of developing ASD, any developmental delay, and developmental speech or language disorder in later life.
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 06/2014; 8(6):625–632. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 13-year-old boy suffered from hypersomnia, fragmented nighttime sleep, and cataplexy since age 10 years, and then developed prominent psychotic symptoms (i.e., auditory and visual hallucination, hallucinatory behavior, delusions of reference, and misidentification) that occurred persistently during the wakeful and consciously clear period when he was aged 12 years. The child underwent additional medical evaluation and testing, and comorbidity of narcolepsy and schizophrenia was diagnosed. The child's psychotic symptoms and narcolepsy improved significantly upon treatment with methylphenidate 30 mg, olanzapine 25 mg, and haloperidol 10 mg. In this case, the child's symptomology of narcolepsy and schizophrenia and the dilemma of the use of antipsychotics and psychostimulants are representative examples of the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in adolescent psychiatry.
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association 01/2014; · 0.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has suggested an association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and allergic disorders, but epidemiological evidence regarding asthma remains limited. We conducted a nationwide population-based prospective cohort study (1:4 case:control patients, age- and gender-matched), hypothesizing that asthma in infancy or toddlerhood increased the risk of ASD. The participants comprised 2134 asthmatic infants and children and 8536 controls aged 0–3 years in 2002. We identified cases of ASD that occurred near the end of the follow-up period (December 31, 2010), determining that asthmatic infants and children exhibited a higher accumulative incidence rate of ASD than did the controls (1.3% vs 0.7%, P = .007). After adjusting for age at enrollment, gender, level of urbanization, and comorbid allergic diseases (i.e., allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis), asthmatic infants and children exhibited an elevated risk of developing ASD (hazard ratio: 2.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.19–3.40). This prospective study indicated a temporal relation between asthma and subsequent ASD diagnosis, supporting the immune hypothesis of ASD pathogenesis. Further studies are required to clarify the probable interactional effects between these disorders and define a homogenous ASD subgroup.
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 01/2014; 8(4):381–386. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The serotonin hypothesis plays a critical role in the etiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Although many studies have demonstrated reciprocal relationships between serotonin metabolism and immune-inflammatory pathways that occur in depression, studies linking serotonergic function and cytokines are still limited concerning BD. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of brain serotonin transporter (SERT) and cytokines in BD. Twenty patients with euthymic BD and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) were recruited. Single photon emission computed tomography with the radiotracer (123) I-ADAM was used for the SERT imaging. The specific uptake ratio, which represents SERT availability, was the primary measured outcome. Cytokines included the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Cytokine concentration was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. SERT availability was significantly lower in the midbrain and caudate of patients with BD compared with HC, but not in the thalamus and putamen. IL-10 was significantly higher, whereas TNF-α was not different in euthymic patients with BD compared with HC. There was a significant association of SERT availability and IL-10 in the thalamus, but not in the midbrain, caudate, or putamen. Our results demonstrate the interaction of SERT availability and IL-10 in euthymic BD. This result may further explain the role of SERT and cytokines in the etiology of BD.
    Bipolar Disorders 12/2013; · 4.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and asthma are commonly comorbid together, and are associated with an increased risk of development of mood disorders separately. However, there has been no study investigating the comorbid effect of these two disorders on developing mood disorder. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database, adolescents with ADHD-alone, asthma-alone, ADHD comorbid with asthma, and age-/gender-matched (1:4) controls were recruited in 2003. Subjects who developed major depression, any depressive disorder, or bipolar disorder during the follow-up period (2003-2010) were identified. In all, 1172 adolescents with ADHD-alone, 487 with asthma-alone, 238 with ADHD+asthma, and 7552 controls were recruited in 2003. Adolescents with ADHD+asthma and those with ADHD-alone, but not those with asthma-alone, had an elevated risk of developing major depression (hazard ratio [HR]: 10.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.86-27.19; HR: 8.64, 95%CI: 5.00-14.93; HR: 2.11, 95%CI: 0.71-6.23) and bipolar disorder (HR: 31.25, 95%CI: 8.87-110.12; HR: 10.42, 95%CI: 4.60-23.63; HR: 1.91, 95%CI: 0.24-15.32) compared to the control group. Our results showed that ADHD adolescents had an increased risk of developing both unipolar depression and bipolar depression in their later life, and that the comorbidity of asthma with a synergistic effect increased this risk further. The underlying pathophysiology among ADHD, asthma, and mood disorders needs further investigation.
    Journal of affective disorders 11/2013; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have suggested an immunological dysfunction in mood disorders, but rarely have investigated the temporal association between allergic diseases and mood disorders. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we attempted to investigate the association between asthma in early adolescence and the risk of unipolar depression and bipolar disorder in later life. In all, 1453 adolescents with asthma aged between 10 and 15 years and 5812 age-/gender-matched controls were selected in 1998-2000. Subjects with unipolar depression and bipolar disorder that occurred up to the end of follow-up (December 31 2010) were identified. Adolescents with asthma had a higher incidence of major depression (2.8% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), any depressive disorder (6.1% vs. 2.6%, p < 0.001), and bipolar disorder (1.0% vs. 0.3%, p < 0.001) than the control group. Cox regression analysis showed that asthma in early adolescence was associated with an increased risk of developing major depression (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.89), any depressive disorder (HR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.27-2.37), and bipolar disorder (HR: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.01-5.07), after adjusting for demographic data and comorbid allergic diseases. Adolescents with asthma had an elevated risk of developing mood disorders in later life. Further studies would be required to investigate the underlying mechanisms for this comorbid association and elucidate whether prompt intervention for asthma would decrease the risk of developing mood disorders.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 11/2013; · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    11th World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Kyoto, Japan; 06/2013
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A great deal of evidence has shown that iron is an important component in cognitive, sensorimotor, and social-emotional development and functioning, because the development of central nervous system processes is highly dependent on iron-containing enzymes and proteins. Deficiency of iron in early life may increase the risk of psychiatric morbidity. METHODS: Utilizing the National Health Insurance Database from 1996 to 2008, children and adolescents with a diagnosis of IDA were identified and compared with age and gender-matched controls (1:4) in an investigation of the increased risk of psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: A total of 2957 patients with IDA, with an increased risk of unipolar depressive disorder (OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.58 ~ 3.46), bipolar disorder (OR = 5.78, 95% CI = 2.23 ~ 15.05), anxiety disorder (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.49 ~ 3.16), autism spectrum disorder (OR = 3.08, 95% CI = 1.79 ~ 5.28), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.29 ~ 2.17), tic disorder (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.03 ~ 2.78), developmental delay (OR = 2.45, 95% CI = 2.00 ~ 3.00), and mental retardation (OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 2.00 ~ 3.65), were identified. A gender effect was noted, in that only female patients with IDA had an increased OR of bipolar disorder (OR = 5.56, 95% CI = 1.98 ~ 15.70) and tic disorder (OR = 2.95, 95%CI = 1.27 ~ 6.86). CONCLUSION: Iron deficiency increased the risk of psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and developmental disorders. Further study is required to clarify the mechanism in the association between IDA and psychiatric disorder.
    BMC Psychiatry 06/2013; 13(1):161. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the temporal relationship was not determined. Using a nationwide population-based prospective case-control cohort study (1:4, age-/gender-matched), we hypothesized that asthma in infanthood or early childhood would increase the risk of ADHD in later life. METHODS: In all, 2,294 children with asthma and 9,176 controls aged between 0 and 3 years in 2000 were included in our study. Cases of ADHD that occurred to the end of follow-up (31 December 2010) were identified. RESULTS: Children with asthma had a higher incidence of developing ADHD (7% vs. 4.6%, p < .001) than control cohort during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age at enrollment, gender, level of urbanization, and comorbid allergic diseases (allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis), children with asthma had an elevated risk (HR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.07-1.59) of developing ADHD compared with control group. DISCUSSION: Our prospective study supported a temporal relationship between asthma and ADHD. Asthma in very early life increased the risk of developing ADHD during the school years. Further studies are required to investigate whether the prompt treatment of asthma and comorbid allergic diseases could prevent the development of ADHD or decrease ADHD symptoms.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 06/2013; · 5.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder (CD), and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) are frequently comorbid. Previous studies suggested that the comorbidity of CD and ODD in ADHD may increase the risk of a further development of mood disorder, but most studies had a small sample size. Using a population-based prospective study design, a large sample composed of 1277 adolescents with ADHD-alone, 46 with ADHD + ODD, 87 with ADHD + CD, and 5640 age/gender-matched controls were enrolled in 2003. These cases were followed to 2010 to identify the cases developing unipolar depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. ADHD + CD groups exhibited a higher prevalence of unipolar depressive disorder (23.0% vs. 13.0% vs. 8.7% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001) and bipolar disorder (3.4% vs. 2.2% vs. 1.3% vs. 0.2%, p < 0.001) than ADHD + ODD group, ADHD-alone group, and control group. Adolescents with ADHD + CD, those with ADHD + ODD, and those with ADHD-alone had a higher likelihood of developing unipolar depressive disorder (hazard ratio [HR]: 44.34, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.95-71.36; HR: 18.76, 95%CI: 7.87-44.71; HR: 13.01, 95%CI: 8.99-18.82) and bipolar disorder (HR: 14.39, 95%CI: 4.00-51.80; HR: 8.32, 95%CI: 1.06-65.32; HR: 5.24, 95%CI: 2.44-11.24) than the controls. Adolescents with ADHD had elevated risks of unipolar depression and bipolar disorder in their later life, and especially, those with ADHD and comorbidity of CD or ODD exhibited the highest risk. Further study would be required to evaluate whether prompt intervention for ADHD and disruptive behavior problems would decrease the risk of developing mood disorder.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 04/2013; · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Patients with ADHD have been suggested to have increased risks of allergic diseases but without consistent results, and limited studies about the association between ADHD and autoimmune diseases were noted in the literature. Method: Utilizing the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, ADHD patients were identified and compared with age- and gender-matched controls (1:4). Results: In all, 8,201 participants were identified as having ADHD, and an increased prevalence of allergic diseases, including asthma (odds ratio [OR] = 1.53), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.59), atopic dermatitis (OR = 1.53), and urticaria (OR = 1.39), compared with the control group. Although the comorbidity of autoimmune diseases with ADHD was low, ADHD patients had a significantly greater prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (OR = 2.78), ulcerative colitis (OR = 2.31), and autoimmune thyroid disease (OR = 2.53) than the controls. Conclusion: Our results supported the association between ADHD and allergic/autoimmune diseases. The further studies will be required to clarify the underlying mechanisms. (J. of Att. Dis. 2013; XX(X) 1-XX).
    Journal of Attention Disorders 02/2013; · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous clinical and genetic studies have suggested autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is associated with immunological abnormalities involving cytokines, immunoglobulins, inflammation, and cellular immunity, but epidemiological reports are still limited. Patients with ASDs were identified in the National Health Insurance Database from 1996 to 2010, and compared with age and gender-matched controls (1:4) in an investigation of the association between ASDs and allergic/autoimmune diseases. A total of 1596 patients with ASDs were identified, and were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of allergic and autoimmune diseases than the control group. Patients with ASDs had increased risks of asthma (OR = 1.74, 95%CI = 1.51–1.99), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.51–1.91), atopic dermatitis (OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.30–1.78), urticaria (OR = 1.38, 95%CI = 1.12–1.69) and type 1 diabetes (OR = 4.00, 95%CI = 1.00–16.00), and a trend toward increasing comorbidity with Crohn's disease (OR = 1.46, 95%CI = 0.90–2.35). Our results support the association between ASDs and allergic diseases, and autoimmune comorbidities (type 1 diabetes and Crohn's disease). Further basic study is required to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms and roles of allergy immunity and autoimmunity in the etiology of ASDs.
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 02/2013; 7(2):205–212. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: RATIONALE: The influence of acute D2 agonist quinpirole on locomotor activity has been effectively characterized. However, few studies have addressed the dynamic changes in neuronal activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and striatum (STR), two crucial regions for cognitive and motor functions, after quinpirole administration. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted in order to acquire detailed information on the evoked activity of the neurons in the ACC and STR after acute quinpirole administration. METHODS: Multichannel electrophysiological recording was used for tracking neuronal activity in the ACC and STR of urethane-anesthetized rats after administration of saline or 0.05 or 0.5 mg/kg quinpirole. RESULTS: In contrast to the responses to saline, quinpirole dose-dependently increased the ratio of neurons, the activity of which was inhibited in the ACC and STR. By examining the ensemble neuronal activities of inhibition-responded neurons, there was no significant activity difference among the "treatments" (saline and low- and high-dose quinpirole), the "periods" (the duration of 0-15 and 16-45 min after i.v. injection), and the interaction between "treatments" and "periods." Regarding activation-responded neurons, however, there was a significant "periods" difference in both ACC and STR, and the activity of 16-45 min was significantly higher than the activity of 0-15 min after high-dose quinpirole administration in ACC (p < 0.05) and STR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Dose-dependent ACC and STR neuronal responses to quinpirole may offer a possible mechanism for understanding the locomotor responses to quinpirole in behaving rats. The late excitatory effect of high-dose quinpirole in the STR further suggests that this region would be critical for the activation of locomotor activity.
    Psychopharmacology 01/2013; · 4.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:  Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and tic disorder usually co-occur in the same individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Previous evidence has shown that a frequent coexistence of allergic diseases was noted in patients with ADHD or tic disorder. We attempted to investigate the possible link among ADHD, tic disorder, and various allergic diseases. Methods:  Utilizing the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from 1996 to 2010, 5,811 patients with ADHD alone, 1,816 patients with tic disorder alone, and 349 patients with dual diagnoses of ADHD and tic disorder were identified and compared with age-/gender-matched controls (1:4) in an investigation of the association among ADHD, tic disorder, and allergic diseases. Results:  Patients with dual diagnoses of ADHD and tic disorder had a significantly higher prevalence of allergic diseases and psychiatric comorbidities, including allergic rhinitis (43% vs. 28.4% vs. 33.6% vs. 19.7%, p < 0.001), asthma (27.5% vs. 17.2% vs. 18.2% vs. 11.9%, p < 0.001), atopic dermatitis (10.6% vs. 8.4% vs. 7.0 vs. 5.9%, p < 0.001), allergic conjunctivitis (55.6% vs. 34.7% vs. 43.5% vs. 26.3%, p < 0.001), obsessive compulsive disorder (4.0% vs. 1.3% vs. 2.0% vs. 0.1%, p < 0.001), and anxiety disorder (22.1% vs. 18.0% vs. 6.0% vs. 0.5%, p < 0.001) than the ADHD alone group, the tic alone group, and the control group. Furthermore, ADHD patients with more allergic diseases (≥3 comorbidities: OR: 3.73, 95% CI: 2.65∼5.25; 2 comorbidities: OR: 2.52, 95% CI: 1.82∼3.47; 1 comorbidity: OR: 1.87, 95% CI: 1.41∼2.49) exhibited an increased risk of tic disorder compared with ADHD patients without allergic disease. Conclusion:  A significant association among ADHD, tic disorder, and allergic diseases was noted in our study. The results may inspire further studies to clarify the underlying mechanisms and help us understand more about the complex etiology of ADHD, tic disorder, and their co-occurrence.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2012; · 5.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the impact of video game playing on the human brain, the effects of two video games playing on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in young adults were determined. Thirty healthy subjects comprising 18 males and 12 females who were familiar with video game playing were recruited. Each subject underwent three sessions of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a bolus injection of 20mCi (99m)Tc ECD IV to measure their CBF. The first measurement was performed as baseline, the second and third measurements were performed after playing two different video games for 30min, respectively. Statistic parametric mapping (SPM2) with Matlab 6.5 implemented on a personal computer was used for image analysis. CBF was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex and significantly increased in the temporal and occipital cortices after both video games playing. Furthermore, decreased CBF in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) which was significantly correlated with the number of killed characters was found after the violent game playing. The major finding of hypo-perfusion in prefrontal regions after video game playing is consistent with a previous study showing reduced or abnormal prefrontal cortex functions after video game playing. The second finding of decreased CBF in the ACC after playing the violent video game provides support for a previous hypothesis that the ACC might play a role in regulating violent behavior.
    Psychiatry research. 11/2012;

Publication Stats

48 Citations
83.86 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • National Yang Ming University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan
  • 2010–2014
    • Taipei Veterans General Hospital
      • Division of Psychiatry
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan
  • 2012
    • Weill Cornell Medical College
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan