M E Mattson

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, Maryland, United States

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Publications (36)87.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Identifying factors that modify responsiveness to pharmacotherapies for alcohol dependence is important for treatment planning. Cigarette smoking predicts more severe alcohol dependence and poorer treatment response in general. Nevertheless, there is limited research on cigarette smoking as a potential predictor of differential response to pharmacological treatment of alcoholism. We examined the association between cigarette smoking and drinking outcomes in the COMBINE (Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence) study, a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled 16-week trial comparing combinations of medications (i.e., acamprosate and naltrexone) and behavioral interventions (i.e., medical management, combined behavioral therapy) in 1383 alcohol-dependent individuals. Smokers (i.e., more than one half the sample) significantly differed from nonsmokers on several demographic and drinking-related variables at baseline and generally had poorer treatment outcomes than nonsmokers. However, smokers who received naltrexone had better drinking outcomes than smokers who received placebo, whereas alcohol use among nonsmokers did not vary by naltrexone assignment. This pattern of findings occurred independent of whether patients received combined behavioral intervention or medical management and remained after controlling for alcoholism typology and baseline demographic differences. Approximately 9% of smokers quit smoking, and an additional 10% reduced their cigarette intake during treatment. Reductions in smoking did not vary by treatment assignment. These results suggest that naltrexone might be particularly beneficial for improving alcohol use outcomes in alcohol-dependent smokers.
    Biological psychiatry 04/2012; 72(10):832-8. · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the development of medications to treat alcohol dependence, few medications have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The use of certain anticonvulsant medications has demonstrated potential efficacy in treating alcohol dependence. Previous research suggests that the anticonvulsant levetiracetam may be beneficial in an alcohol-dependent population of very heavy drinkers. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 130 alcohol-dependent patients who reported very heavy drinking were recruited across 5 clinical sites. Patients received either levetiracetam extended-release (XR) or placebo and a Brief Behavioral Compliance Enhancement Treatment intervention. Levetiracetam XR was titrated during the first 4 weeks to 2,000 mg/d. This target dose was maintained during weeks 5 through 14 and was tapered during weeks 15 and 16. No significant differences were detected between the levetiracetam XR and placebo groups in either the primary outcomes (percent heavy drinking days and percent subjects with no heavy drinking days) or in other secondary drinking outcomes. Treatment groups did not differ on a number of nondrinking outcomes, including depression, anxiety, mood, and quality of life. The only difference observed was in alcohol-related consequences. The levetiracetam XR treatment group showed significantly fewer consequences than did the placebo group during the maintenance period (p = 0.02). Levetiracetam XR was well tolerated, with fatigue being the only significantly elevated adverse event, compared with placebo (53% vs. 24%, respectively; p = 0.001). This multisite clinical trial showed no efficacy for levetiracetam XR compared with placebo in reducing alcohol consumption in heavy drinking alcohol-dependent patients.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 02/2012; 36(8):1421-30. · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite advances in developing medications to treat alcohol dependence, few such medications have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Identified molecular targets are encouraging and can lead to the development and testing of new compounds. Atypical antipsychotic medications have been explored with varying results. Prior research suggests that the antipsychotic quetiapine may be beneficial in an alcohol-dependent population of very heavy drinkers. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 224 alcohol-dependent patients who reported very heavy drinking were recruited across 5 clinical sites. Patients received either quetiapine or placebo and Medical Management behavioral intervention. Patients were stratified on gender, clinical site, and reduction in drinking prior to randomization. No differences between the quetiapine and placebo groups were detected in the primary outcome, percentage heavy-drinking days, or other drinking outcomes. Quetiapine significantly reduced depressive symptoms and improved sleep but had no effect on other nondrinking outcomes. Results from a subgroup analysis suggest that patients who reduced their drinking prior to randomization had significantly better drinking outcomes during the maintenance phase (p < 0.0001). No significant interactions, however, were observed between reducer status and treatment group. Finally, quetiapine was generally well tolerated. Statistically significant adverse events that were more common with quetiapine versus placebo include dizziness (14 vs. 4%), dry mouth (32 vs. 9%), dyspepsia (13 vs. 2%), increased appetite (11 vs. 1%), sedation (15 vs. 3%), and somnolence (34 vs. 9%). This multisite clinical trial showed no efficacy for quetiapine compared with placebo at reducing alcohol consumption in heavy-drinking alcohol-dependent patients.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 09/2011; 36(3):406-16. · 3.42 Impact Factor
  • John P. Allen, Cherry Lowman, Margaret E. Mattson, Raye Z. Litten
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    ABSTRACT: The past 10 years have witnessed dramatic growth in alcoholism research. In particular, attention has been focused intensely on techniques that diagnose and treat alcoholism more effectively. The evolution and expansion of this important area is reflected by the fact that in 1990, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the major funding source for alcoholism research in the world, expended over 22 million on investigations primarily oriented toward treatment issues, whereas the comparable figure a decade earlier was below22 million on investigations primarily oriented toward treatment issues, whereas the comparable figure a decade earlier was below 2 million. In light of the magnitude as well as the economic and personal cost of alcoholism, public support for research on treatment is likely to be sustained and, in fact, strengthened in the future.
    06/2011: pages 33-64;
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    ABSTRACT: Percent subjects with no heavy drinking days (PSNHDDs), an efficacy end point recommended by the Food and Drug Administration, considers abstinent individuals or those engaging in low-risk drinking behavior as successful responders to treatment. As PSNHDD has been used infrequently in previous alcohol clinical trials, we evaluated the utility and validity of the PSNHDD outcome measure in 2 large alcohol clinical trials. Data sets from 2 alcohol trials, COMBINE and a multisite topiramate trial, were used to analyze PSNHDDs and other traditional end points for the topiramate, naltrexone, acamprosate, and placebo groups. Effect sizes of PSNHDDs were determined for each month of active treatment and by varying grace periods-early periods in the trial where outcome is not considered in the analysis-and were compared with that of other traditional outcome measures. Long-term outcomes were compared for groups that had no heavy drinking days versus those that had heavy drinking days during active treatment. PSNHDD effect sizes were significant for both topiramate (0.34 and 0.25 at months 2 and 3, respectively) and naltrexone (0.24 and 0.26 at months 3 and 4, respectively). Given a 2-month grace period for naltrexone, the effect size of PSNHDDs was comparable to the effect sizes using traditional outcome measures. With a 1-month grace period for topiramate, it was greater than the majority of traditional outcome measures. Little is gained by allowing up to 1, 2, or 3 heavy drinking days as an end point. Subjects with no HDDs during treatment fared better than those with some HDDs on drinking outcomes and alcohol-related consequences during a 1-year follow-up. PSNHDD appears to be a clinically informative end point measure, especially when used with a grace period, and is as sensitive as most traditional outcome measures in detecting differences between the medication and placebo groups. Nonetheless, these findings should be replicated in other clinical data sets, particularly with medications that work via different mechanisms.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 12/2010; 34(12):2022-34. · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little information is available on alcohol use in children up to age 10, although rates appear to be low. This age-group is not without risk, however. In fact, numerous nonspecific and specific risk factors for subsequent alcohol use are prevalent in childhood. Alcohol-nonspecific risk factors include externalizing and internalizing behaviors, as well as environmental and social factors (e.g., stress, physical abuse, or other aspects of social interaction). Nonspecific childhood factors (i.e., predictors) are being identified to target specific population subgroups for preventive interventions. These efforts have identified a variety of predictors of drinking onset during childhood or early adolescence that predict adolescent and young-adult problem drinking, as well as adult alcohol use and alcohol use disorders. Alcohol-specific risk factors also are being identified, including children's beliefs and expectancies about alcohol, as well as childhood social contexts (e.g., modeling of alcohol use by parents, portrayal of alcohol use in the mass media, and growing up in a family with an alcoholic family member). Together, these specific and nonspecific influences play a heavy role in determining a child's risk of or resilience to later alcohol use and related problems.
    Alcohol research & health: the journal of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 06/2009; 32(1):16-29. · 0.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the full range of alcohol treatment effectiveness, it is important to assess secondary nondrinking outcome dimensions in addition to primary alcohol consumption outcomes. We used a large sample (n=1,226) of alcohol-dependent participants entering the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism-sponsored COMBINE (Combining Medications and Behavioral Interventions) Study, a multisite clinical trial of pharmacological (naltrexone [ReVia] and acamprosate [Campral]) and behavioral interventions, to examine the effects of specific treatment combinations on nondrinking functional outcomes. We assessed the outcomes at baseline and at the end of 16 weeks of alcohol treatment and again at the 26-week and/or 52-week postrandomization follow-ups. (1) Drinking and secondary outcomes were significantly related, especially at the follow-up periods. A higher percentage of heavy drinking days, more drinks per drinking day, and lower percentage of days abstinent were associated with lower quality-of-life measures. (2) All nondrinking outcomes showed improvement at the end of 16 weeks of treatment and most maintained improvement over the 26-week and 52-week follow-ups. Only two measures returned to pretreatment levels at 52 weeks: percentage of days paid for work and physical health. Improvements of nondrinking outcomes remained even after adjusting for posttreatment heavy drinking status. (3) Although nondrinking outcomes showed overall improvement, specific pharmacological and behavioral treatment combinations were not differentially effective on specific secondary outcomes. In the current study, changes that resulted from treatment were multidimensional, and improvements in nondrinking outcomes reflected the overall significant improvement in drinking but they were not differentiated between treatment combination groups. Findings from this study support the importance of including secondary nondrinking outcomes in clinical alcohol-treatment trials.
    Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs 04/2009; 70(2):186-96. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Within the alcoholism field, there is mounting evidence supporting an important relationship between medication adherence and drinking outcomes. Little is known however, about the complex relationships between medication and treatment variables and drinking outcomes. The present paper reports on the differential impact of medication adherence and treatment factors on drinking outcomes. Data derived from the COMBINE Study was used to investigate the interrelationships between medication adherence, combination treatments and drinking outcomes. Twelve hundred and twenty-six patients were randomized to 1 of 8 different combination treatments involving 2 medications--naltrexone and acamprosate and placebo, and 2 behavioral treatments--medical management (MM) and combined behavioral intervention (CBI). Two primary drinking outcomes were percent days abstinent (PDA) and time to first heavy drinking day. Medication adherence was defined as a proportion that reflects the number of pills taken by the maximum number of pills expected to be taken over the course of the trial. A generalized linear mixed model was used to estimate the effects of adherence on PDA while proportional hazards model was used to examine similar co-variate effects on time to first heavy drinking day. Concerning time to first heavy drinking day, a significant three-way interaction was found between medication adherence, CBI and naltrexone (p = 0.0160). Within the MM only plus placebo group (no CBI), significant differences were found in "recovery" (i.e., no heavy drinking days) rates between adherers and nonadherers (40% vs. 10%, p < 0.0001). Such differences became nonsignificant (p = 0.12) when CBI was introduced into the relationship. CBI did not add any such advantage to naltrexone-treated patients. CBI might serve a protective function for nonadherers in the placebo group; the median relapse time was reduced when these nonadherers were exposed to the alcohol specialty intervention. CBI offered little additional benefit to nonadherers in the naltrexone group. Among nonadherers in the naltrexone group, relapse rates appear to be more a function of inadequate exposure to the active medication and less influenced by CBI.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2008; 32(9):1661-9. · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Developmental pathways to underage drinking emerge before the second decade of life. Many scientists, however, as well as the general public, continue to focus on proximal influences surrounding the initiation of drinking in adolescence, such as social, behavioral, and genetic variables related to availability and ease of acquisition of the drug, social reinforcement for its use, and individual differences in drug responses. In the past 20 years, a considerable body of evidence has accumulated on the early (often much earlier than the time of the first drink) predictors and pathways of youthful alcohol use and abuse. These early developmental influences involve numerous risk, vulnerability, promotive, and protective processes. Some of these factors are not related directly to alcohol use, whereas others involve learning and expectancies about later drug use that are shaped by social experience. The salience of these factors (identifiable in early childhood) for understanding the course and development of adult alcohol and other drug use disorders is evident from the large and growing body of findings on their ability to predict adult clinical outcomes. This review summarizes the evidence on early pathways toward and away from underage drinking, with a particular focus on the risk and protective factors and the mediators and moderators of risk for underage drinking that become evident during the preschool and early school years. It is guided by a developmental perspective on the aggregation of risk and protection and examines the contributions of biological, psychological, and social processes within the context of normal development. Implications of this evidence for policy, intervention, and future research are discussed.
    PEDIATRICS 05/2008; 121 Suppl 4:S252-72. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol dependence treatment may include medications, behavioral therapies, or both. It is unknown how combining these treatments may impact their effectiveness, especially in the context of primary care and other nonspecialty settings. To evaluate the efficacy of medication, behavioral therapies, and their combinations for treatment of alcohol dependence and to evaluate placebo effect on overall outcome. Randomized controlled trial conducted January 2001-January 2004 among 1383 recently alcohol-abstinent volunteers (median age, 44 years) from 11 US academic sites with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnoses of primary alcohol dependence. Eight groups of patients received medical management with 16 weeks of naltrexone (100 mg/d) or acamprosate (3 g/d), both, and/or both placebos, with or without a combined behavioral intervention (CBI). A ninth group received CBI only (no pills). Patients were also evaluated for up to 1 year after treatment. Percent days abstinent from alcohol and time to first heavy drinking day. All groups showed substantial reduction in drinking. During treatment, patients receiving naltrexone plus medical management (n = 302), CBI plus medical management and placebos (n = 305), or both naltrexone and CBI plus medical management (n = 309) had higher percent days abstinent (80.6, 79.2, and 77.1, respectively) than the 75.1 in those receiving placebos and medical management only (n = 305), a significant naltrexone x behavioral intervention interaction (P = .009). Naltrexone also reduced risk of a heavy drinking day (hazard ratio, 0.72; 97.5% CI, 0.53-0.98; P = .02) over time, most evident in those receiving medical management but not CBI. Acamprosate showed no significant effect on drinking vs placebo, either by itself or with any combination of naltrexone, CBI, or both. During treatment, those receiving CBI without pills or medical management (n = 157) had lower percent days abstinent (66.6) than those receiving placebo plus medical management alone (n = 153) or placebo plus medical management and CBI (n = 156) (73.8 and 79.8, respectively; P<.001). One year after treatment, these between-group effects were similar but no longer significant. Patients receiving medical management with naltrexone, CBI, or both fared better on drinking outcomes, whereas acamprosate showed no evidence of efficacy, with or without CBI. No combination produced better efficacy than naltrexone or CBI alone in the presence of medical management. Placebo pills and meeting with a health care professional had a positive effect above that of CBI during treatment. Naltrexone with medical management could be delivered in health care settings, thus serving alcohol-dependent patients who might otherwise not receive treatment. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00006206.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 06/2006; 295(17):2003-17. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment and follow-up session attendance data from Project MATCH, a multisite clinical trial investigating patient-treatment matching, were analyzed to study compliance. High rates of compliance to both therapy and research protocols were achieved, enhancing treatment integrity and data quality. Strong baseline predictors of compliance did not emerge, and the small relationships found were consistent with reports from previous studies. Attendance at therapy sessions was moderately correlated with research follow-up participation. Treatment compliance predicted drinking outcome, underscoring the importance of retaining patients in treatment. Future studies should examine the associations between compliance and structural features of the treatment environment, treatment delivery, and context-features that are often under the control of the clinician/investigator.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 05/2006; 22(6):1328 - 1339. · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article argues that nondrinking outcomes are essential to include in complex trials such as COMBINE to assess the hypothesized mechanisms of action and behavioral change associated with both medications and psychotherapy. Toward this end, COMBINE is used as a case study for (1) discussing hypothesized mechanisms of action for behavior change, (2) discussing distinctive design features of combined studies, (3) highlighting issues in the selection of outcome measures, (4) providing a framework for organizing outcome domains and measures and (5) providing a dose-response model for assessing alcoholism treatment outcomes. A review of the literature and discussion of methodological issues in assessing nondrinking outcomes is provided as well as a case study in developing a conceptual framework for selecting outcome measures. The results of the review and case study include the development of a framework for categorizing outcome dimensions and measures into condition-specific clinical status, condition-specific symptoms and personal and interpersonal functioning outcomes. In addition, a model is provided for assessing the dose-response of combined alcoholism treatment with multiple dimensions of outcome during and after treatment. Consistent with previous observations that recovery from alcohol dependence is a multidimensional developmental process, the COMBINE Study will examine the effects of different combinations of pharmacotherapy and behavioral interventions on the magnitude and pattern of changes in various outcome dimensions (both drinking and nondrinking) over time.
    Journal of studies on alcohol. Supplement 08/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: The present article reviews the literature to date dealing with quality of life (QoL) as it relates to drinking behavior, alcohol use disorders and treatment outcome. Articles using the term "quality of life" to describe a status or outcome construct for individuals diagnosed with or being treated for alcohol use disorders or that used one or more instruments considered to reflect patients' QoL were identified primarily through Psychological Abstracts, MEDLINE and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's ETOH archival database. Thirty-six studies, published between 1993 and 2004, met these criteria. Twelve different QoL measures were used. Frequent heavy drinking or episodic heavy drinking (e.g., five or more drinks per occasion) patterns were associated with reduced QoL. Alcoholics had lower levels of QoL compared with general population norms or with other chronic health conditions. This relationship appears to be moderated by a number of sociodemographic and client characteristics, such as age, education, gender and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Alcohol-dependent individuals experience improvements in QoL across treatment and with both short-term and long-term abstinence. Despite these improvements, many alcoholic individuals' QoL is unlikely to equal or exceed that of normative groups. Also, among hazardous and harmful drinkers, achieving and maintaining a marked reduction in drinking, even without complete abstinence, is associated with significant increases in QoL. QoL represents an important area to consider in assessing individuals with alcohol use disorders and in evaluating alcoholism treatment outcome.
    Journal of studies on alcohol. Supplement 08/2005;
  • Margaret E Mattson, Raye Z Litten
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment of alcohol disorders through the use of combinations of pharmacological and behavioral modalities may more effectively address the multicomponent nature of the disorder than single-modality approaches. Interdisciplinary models of the biological, psychological and social components of alcohol disorders are emerging rapidly from basic research, and treatment researchers have begun to test various strategies to combine medications and behavioral treatments. In addition to behavioral and pharmacological combinations, effective treatment pairs can be composed of two medications whose mechanisms of action are believed to be compatible and potentially additive, or even synergistic. Combining Medications and Behavioral Interventions (COMBINE) is a large multisite clinical trial sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Its goal is to determine if improvements in treatment outcome for alcohol dependence can be achieved by combining pharmacotherapy and behavioral interventions. Under evaluation is the efficacy of two promising medications (naltrexone and acamprosate), both singly and together, when used in conjunction with two behavioral treatments of differing intensities. This supplement describes in detail the methods and rationale for the approach taken in COMBINE. This first article in the supplement has three objectives: (1) to review strategies for conducting combination treatment studies as illustrated with selected examples from the literature, (2) to summarize the main design features of COMBINE as background for the articles in this supplement and (3) to comment on future directions for combination treatment research as the field moves beyond COMBINE.
    Journal of studies on alcohol. Supplement 08/2005;
  • Raye Z Litten, Joanne Fertig, Margaret Mattson, Mark Egli
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    ABSTRACT: During the past decade, efforts to develop medications for alcoholism have burgeoned. Three agents, disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate, are now approved in a large number of countries. Although many patients have benefited from existing medications, their effects are moderate, and some alcoholics fail to respond to them. A host of new agents are currently under active investigation. Critical barriers must be overcome to ensure that future efforts in the development of medications for alcohol use disorders reach full fruition. These challenges include: establishing key targets for drug discovery; validating animal and human screening models; and developing biomarkers to help predict treatment success. In addition, it is important to formulate methodological and statistical strategies to efficiently conduct alcohol pharmacotherapy trials; to specify genetic and phenotypic patient characteristics associated with efficacy and safety for lead compounds; to forge productive alliances among governmental agencies, the pharmaceutical industry and academic researchers to further drug development; and, ultimately and perhaps most difficult, to engage the practitioner community to incorporate medications into the alcohol treatment process.
    Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs 06/2005; 10(2):323-43. · 2.48 Impact Factor
  • Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 09/2003; 27(8):1318-20. · 3.42 Impact Factor
  • Margaret E Mattson
    Recent developments in alcoholism: an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism 02/2003; 16:97-113.
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    ABSTRACT: There is a growing appreciation that emotional, physical and sexual abuse events are frequently part of the life histories of individuals in treatment for alcohol disorders. The present study examines reports of lifetime abuse in a clinical trial for treatment of alcohol dependency. Data were obtained from baseline assessments conducted with participants (N = 1,726; 1,307 men) entering Project MATCH, a multisite clinical trial conducted at nine geographically dispersed research sites. Differences on a broad range of participant characteristics were examined by gender and by reported abuse type. More than half (59%) of the participants reported lifetime abuse. Women were more likely (77%) to report abuse than were men (54%). A lower proportion of men than women (6% vs 31%) reported experiencing both physical and sexual abuse. Gender differences were found on the majority of psychosocial measures. Comparisons of the psychosocial measures by abuse type generally indicated that participants without abuse histories had better functioning than did participants reporting abuse. The high frequency of lifetime abuse in this geographically dispersed sample underscores the necessity for including assessment of emotional, physical and sexual abuse with alcoholism treatment seeking populations. Participants reporting such events may require other treatment in addition to that for alcohol dependency.
    Journal of studies on alcohol 02/2001; 62(1):114-23.
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    ABSTRACT: The literature suggests that women exhibit "telescoped" development of (i.e., faster progression to) alcoholism, with fewer years drinking than men. The purpose of this study was to use data gathered in the course of a large clinical trial to further examine this issue. Subjects in this retrospective study were from a pool of 1,307 men and 419 women enrolled in Project MATCH, a multisite alcohol treatment matching study. MATCH subjects were recruited from both outpatient and aftercare settings over a 2-year period. Age-of-onset for landmark events in the development of alcoholism were determined from self-report and clinical interviews given at baseline entry into the study. Gender differences in age-of-onset variables were assessed within both outpatient and aftercare settings. Gender differences in progression times between successive landmarks were also examined. Differences were tested with both multivariate and univariate ANOVA techniques. Women generally began getting drunk regularly at a later average age than men (26.6 versus 22.7 years, p< or =.001), began experiencing their first drinking problems at a later average age than men (27.5 versus 25.0 years, p< or =.001) and exhibited loss of control over their drinking at a later average age than men (29.8 versus 27.2 years, p< or =.001). However, these gender differences were most pronounced for older individuals and attenuated for younger subjects. Women also progressed faster than men, on average, between first getting drunk regularly and first encountering drinking problems (0.9 versus 2.3 years, p< or =.001) and between first loss of drinking control and onset of worst drinking problems (5.5 versus 7.8 years, p< or =.001). Women also exhibited shorter average progression times between first getting drunk regularly and first seeking treatment (11.6 versus 15.8 years, p< or =.001), although this effect was negligible for younger subjects. Telescoping is a relatively robust phenomenon in treatment-seeking alcoholics and indicates that women are more likely to progress faster through the landmark events in the development of alcoholism than are men.
    Journal of studies on alcohol 04/1999; 60(2):252-60.
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment and follow-up session attendance data from Project MATCH, a multisite clinical trial investigating patient-treatment matching, were analyzed to study compliance. High rates of compliance to both therapy and research protocols were achieved, enhancing treatment integrity and data quality. Strong baseline predictors of compliance did not emerge, and the small relationships found were consistent with reports from previous studies. Attendance at therapy sessions was moderately correlated with research follow-up participation. Treatment compliance predicted drinking outcome, underscoring the importance of retaining patients in treatment. Future studies should examine the associations between compliance and structural features of the treatment environment, treatment delivery, and context-features that are often under the control of the clinician/investigator.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 10/1998; 22(6):1328-39. · 3.42 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
87.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
      Maryland, United States
  • 1991–2010
    • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
      Maryland, United States
  • 1999–2006
    • Medical University of South Carolina
      • • Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs (CDAP)
      • • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
      Charleston, SC, United States
  • 2005
    • University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
    • University of Washington Seattle
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1994
    • University of Connecticut
      • Department of Medicine
      Storrs, CT, United States
  • 1987
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      Maryland, United States
  • 1982
    • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
      Maryland, United States