Bruce M Spiegelman

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (337)4829.06 Total impact

  • Paul Cohen, Bruce M Spiegelman
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    ABSTRACT: The epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes has increased interest in pathways that affect energy balance in mammalian systems. Brown fat, in all of its dimensions, can increase energy expenditure through the dissipation of chemical energy in the form of heat, using mitochondrial uncoupling and perhaps other pathways. We discuss here some of the thermodynamic and cellular aspects of recent progress in brown fat research. This includes studies of developmental lineages of UCP1(+) adipocytes, including the discovery of beige fat cells, a new thermogenic cell type. We also discuss the physiology and transcriptional control of brown and beige cells in rodents and the state of current knowledge about human brown fat. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
    Diabetes 06/2015; DOI:10.2337/db15-0318 · 8.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent recognition that humans possess active depots of brown adipose tissue has boosted the interest in this tissue as a potential target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. Furthermore, it was also revealed that brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans may consist of so-called beige or brite adipocytes. So far, cold exposure is recognised as the strongest activator of BAT in humans, but there is much ongoing research focused on finding alternative activators of BAT. The consequences of long-term BAT activation and/or cold exposure on metabolic health are still unknown, and this represents an area of intensive research. This is one of a series of commentaries under the banner '50 years forward', giving personal opinions on future perspectives in diabetes, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Diabetologia (1965-2015).
    Diabetologia 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00125-015-3611-y · 6.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exercise induces physiological cardiac growth and protects the heart against pathological remodeling. Recent work suggests exercise also enhances the heart's capacity for repair, which could be important for regenerative therapies. While microRNAs are important in certain cardiac pathologies, less is known about their functional roles in exercise-induced cardiac phenotypes. We profiled cardiac microRNA expression in two distinct models of exercise and found microRNA-222 (miR-222) was upregulated in both. Downstream miR-222 targets modulating cardiomyocyte phenotypes were identified, including HIPK1 and HMBOX1. Inhibition of miR-222 in vivo completely blocked cardiac and cardiomyocyte growth in response to exercise while reducing markers of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Importantly, mice with inducible cardiomyocyte miR-222 expression were resistant to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after ischemic injury. These studies implicate miR-222 as necessary for exercise-induced cardiomyocyte growth and proliferation in the adult mammalian heart and show that it is sufficient to protect the heart against adverse remodeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Cell metabolism 04/2015; 21(4):584-595. DOI:10.1016/j.cmet.2015.02.014 · 16.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context: Skeletal muscle from sedentary older adults exhibits reduced mitochondrial abundance and oxidative capacity (OXPHOS). Objective: The primary objective was to determine whether eight weeks of combined training (CT) has more robust effect than, endurance training (ET) or resistance training (RT) on mitochondrial physiology in healthy young (18-30 y) and older (≥65 y) adults. Intervention: Thirty-four young and 31 older adults were randomized to eight weeks of ET, RT, control/CT. Control subjects completed eight weeks of no exercise (control) followed by eight weeks of CT. Body composition, skeletal muscle strength, and peak oxygen uptake were measured before and after the intervention. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and 48 h after the intervention. Mitochondrial physiology was evaluated by high-resolution respirometry, and expression of mitochondrial proteins and transcription factors by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting. Results: ET and CT significantly increased oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial proteins and transcription factors. All training modalities improved body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, and skeletal muscle strength. CT induced the most robust improvements in mitochondrial related outcomes and physical characteristics despite lower training volumes for the ET and RT components. Importantly, most of the adaptations to training occurred independent of age. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that both ET and CT increase muscle mitochondrial abundance and capacity. Although CT induced the most robust improvements in the outcomes measured. In conclusion, CT provides a robust exercise regimen to improve muscle mitochondrial outcomes and physical characteristics independent of age.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 01/2015; 100(4):jc20143081. DOI:10.1210/jc.2014-3081 · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A unique population of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells resides in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of lean mice, especially in the epididymal fat depot. VAT Tregs are unusual in their very high representation within the CD4(+) T-cell compartment, their transcriptome, and their repertoire of antigen-specific T-cell receptors. They are important regulators of local and systemic inflammation and metabolism. The overall goal of this study was to learn how the VAT Treg transcriptome adapts to different stimuli; in particular, its response to aging in lean mice, to metabolic perturbations associated with obesity, and to certain signaling events routed through PPARγ, the "master-regulator" of adipocyte differentiation. We show that the VAT Treg signature is imposed early in life, well before age-dependent expansion of the adipose-tissue Treg population. VAT Tregs in obese mice lose the signature typical of lean individuals but gain an additional set of over- and underrepresented transcripts. This obese mouse VAT Treg signature depends on phosphorylation of the serine residue at position 273 of PPARγ, in striking parallel to a pathway recently elucidated in adipocytes. These findings are important to consider in designing drugs to target type 2 diabetes and other features of the "metabolic syndrome."
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 12/2014; 112(2). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1423486112 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity-linked insulin resistance is a major precursor to the development of type 2 diabetes. Previous work has shown that phosphorylation of PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) at serine 273 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) stimulates diabetogenic gene expression in adipose tissues. Inhibition of this modification is a key therapeutic mechanism for anti-diabetic drugs that bind PPARγ, such as the thiazolidinediones and PPARγ partial agonists or non-agonists. For a better understanding of the importance of this obesity-linked PPARγ phosphorylation, we created mice that ablated Cdk5 specifically in adipose tissues. These mice have both a paradoxical increase in PPARγ phosphorylation at serine 273 and worsened insulin resistance. Unbiased proteomic studies show that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinases are activated in these knockout animals. Here we show that ERK directly phosphorylates serine 273 of PPARγ in a robust manner and that Cdk5 suppresses ERKs through direct action on a novel site in MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK). Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of MEK and ERK markedly improves insulin resistance in both obese wild-type and ob/ob mice, and also completely reverses the deleterious effects of the Cdk5 ablation. These data show that an ERK/Cdk5 axis controls PPARγ function and suggest that MEK/ERK inhibitors may hold promise for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
    Nature 11/2014; DOI:10.1038/nature13887 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha 4 (PGC-1α4) is a protein isoform derived by alternative splicing of the PGC1α mRNA and has been shown to promote muscle hypertrophy. We show here that G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is a transcriptional target of PGC-1α4 and is induced in humans by resistance exercise. Furthermore, the anabolic effects of PGC-1α4 in cultured murine muscle cells are dependent on GPR56 signaling, because knockdown of GPR56 attenuates PGC-1α4-induced muscle hypertrophy in vitro. Forced expression of GPR56 results in myotube hypertrophy through the expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is dependent on Gα12/13 signaling. A murine model of overload-induced muscle hypertrophy is associated with increased expression of both GPR56 and its ligand collagen type III, whereas genetic ablation of GPR56 expression attenuates overload-induced muscle hypertrophy and associated anabolic signaling. These data illustrate a signaling pathway through GPR56 which regulates muscle hypertrophy associated with resistance/loading-type exercise.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10/2014; 111(44). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1417898111 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) at Ser273 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in adipose tissue stimulates insulin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. We show here that Thrap3 (thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 3) can directly interact with PPARγ when it is phosphorylated at Ser273, and this interaction controls the diabetic gene programming mediated by the phosphorylation of PPARγ. Knockdown of Thrap3 restores most of the genes dysregulated by CDK5 action on PPARγ in cultured adipocytes. Importantly, reduced expression of Thrap3 in fat tissue by antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) regulates a specific set of genes, including the key adipokines adiponectin and adipsin, and effectively improves hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in high-fat-fed mice without affecting body weight. These data indicate that Thrap3 plays a crucial role in controlling diabetic gene programming and may provide opportunities for the development of new therapeutics for obesity and type 2 diabetes.
    Genes & Development 10/2014; 28(21). DOI:10.1101/gad.249367.114 · 12.64 Impact Factor
  • Bruce M Spiegelman, Christiane Wrann
    Diabetes 09/2014; 63(9):e17. DOI:10.2337/db14-0898 · 8.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cachexia is a wasting disorder of adipose and skeletal muscle tissues that leads to profound weight loss and frailty. About half of all cancer patients suffer from cachexia, which impairs quality of life, limits cancer therapy and decreases survival. One key characteristic of cachexia is higher resting energy expenditure levels than in healthy individuals, which has been linked to greater thermogenesis by brown fat. How tumours induce brown fat activity is unknown. Here, using a Lewis lung carcinoma model of cancer cachexia, we show that tumour-derived parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has an important role in wasting, through driving the expression of genes involved in thermogenesis in adipose tissues. Neutralization of PTHrP in tumour-bearing mice blocked adipose tissue browning and the loss of muscle mass and strength. Our results demonstrate that PTHrP mediates energy wasting in fat tissues and contributes to the broader aspects of cancer cachexia. Thus, neutralization of PTHrP might hold promise for ameliorating cancer cachexia and improving patient survival.
    Nature 07/2014; 513(7516). DOI:10.1038/nature13528 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the development of pancreatic β cell failure, which results in insulinopenia and hyperglycemia. We show that the adipokine adipsin has a beneficial role in maintaining β cell function. Animals genetically lacking adipsin have glucose intolerance due to insulinopenia; isolated islets from these mice have reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Replenishment of adipsin to diabetic mice treated hyperglycemia by boosting insulin secretion. We identify C3a, a peptide generated by adipsin, as a potent insulin secretagogue and show that the C3a receptor is required for these beneficial effects of adipsin. C3a acts on islets by augmenting ATP levels, respiration, and cytosolic free Ca(2+). Finally, we demonstrate that T2DM patients with β cell failure are deficient in adipsin. These findings indicate that the adipsin/C3a pathway connects adipocyte function to β cell physiology, and manipulation of this molecular switch may serve as a therapy in T2DM.
    Cell 07/2014; 158(1):41-53. DOI:10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.005 · 33.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brown fat can reduce obesity through the dissipation of calories as heat. Control of thermogenic gene expression occurs via the induction of various coactivators, most notably PGC-1α. In contrast, the transcription factor partner(s) of these cofactors are poorly described. Here, we identify interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) as a dominant transcriptional effector of thermogenesis. IRF4 is induced by cold and cAMP in adipocytes and is sufficient to promote increased thermogenic gene expression, energy expenditure, and cold tolerance. Conversely, knockout of IRF4 in UCP1+ cells causes reduced thermogenic gene expression and energy expenditure, obesity, and cold intolerance. IRF4 also induces the expression of PGC-1α and PRDM16 and interacts with PGC-1α, driving Ucp1 expression. Finally, cold, β-agonists, or forced expression of PGC-1α are unable to cause thermogenic gene expression in the absence of IRF4. These studies establish IRF4 as a transcriptional driver of a program of thermogenic gene expression and energy expenditure.
    Cell 07/2014; 158(1):69-83. DOI:10.1016/j.cell.2014.04.049 · 33.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exercise training benefits many organ systems and offers protection against metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Using the recently identified isoform of PGC1-α (PGC1-α4) as a discovery tool, we report the identification of meteorin-like (Metrnl), a circulating factor that is induced in muscle after exercise and in adipose tissue upon cold exposure. Increasing circulating levels of Metrnl stimulates energy expenditure and improves glucose tolerance and the expression of genes associated with beige fat thermogenesis and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Metrnl stimulates an eosinophil-dependent increase in IL-4 expression and promotes alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which are required for the increased expression of the thermogenic and anti-inflammatory gene programs in fat. Importantly, blocking Metrnl actions in vivo significantly attenuates chronic cold-exposure-induced alternative macrophage activation and thermogenic gene responses. Thus, Metrnl links host-adaptive responses to the regulation of energy homeostasis and tissue inflammation and has therapeutic potential for metabolic and inflammatory diseases.
    Cell 06/2014; 157(6):1279-1291. DOI:10.1016/j.cell.2014.03.065 · 33.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thermogenic UCP1-positive cells, which include brown and beige adipocytes, transform chemical energy into heat and increase whole-body energy expenditure. Using a ribosomal profiling approach, we present a comprehensive molecular description of brown and beige gene expression from multiple fat depots in vivo. This UCP1-TRAP data set demonstrates striking similarities and important differences between these cell types, including a smooth muscle-like signature expressed by beige, but not classical brown, adipocytes. In vivo fate mapping using either a constitutive or an inducible Myh11-driven Cre demonstrates that at least a subset of beige cells arise from a smooth muscle-like origin. Finally, ectopic expression of PRDM16 converts bona fide vascular smooth muscle cells into Ucp1-positive adipocytes in vitro. These results establish a portrait of brown and beige adipocyte gene expression in vivo and identify a smooth muscle-like origin for beige cells.
    Cell metabolism 04/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.cmet.2014.03.025. · 16.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thermogenic UCP1-positive cells, which include brown and beige adipocytes, transform chemical energy into heat and increase whole-body energy expenditure. Using a ribosomal profiling approach, we present a comprehensive molecular description of brown and beige gene expression from multiple fat depots in vivo. This UCP1-TRAP data set demonstrates striking similarities and important differences between these cell types, including a smooth muscle-like signature expressed by beige, but not classical brown, adipocytes. In vivo fate mapping using either a constitutive or an inducible Myh11-driven Cre demonstrates that at least a subset of beige cells arise from a smooth muscle-like origin. Finally, ectopic expression of PRDM16 converts bona fide vascular smooth muscle cells into Ucp1-positive adipocytes in vitro. These results establish a portrait of brown and beige adipocyte gene expression in vivo and identify a smooth muscle-like origin for beige cells.
    Cell metabolism 04/2014; 19(5). DOI:10.1016/j.cmet.2014.03.025 · 16.75 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Cardiology 04/2014; 63(12). DOI:10.1016/S0735-1097(14)62147-1 · 15.34 Impact Factor
  • Jun Wu, Bruce M Spiegelman
    Diabetes 02/2014; 63(2):381-3. DOI:10.2337/db13-1586 · 8.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A clear relationship exists between visceral obesity and type 2 diabetes, whereas subcutaneous obesity is comparatively benign. Here, we show that adipocyte-specific deletion of the coregulatory protein PRDM16 caused minimal effects on classical brown fat but markedly inhibited beige adipocyte function in subcutaneous fat following cold exposure or β3-agonist treatment. These animals developed obesity on a high-fat diet, with severe insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. They also showed altered fat distribution with markedly increased subcutaneous adiposity. Subcutaneous adipose tissue in mutant mice acquired many key properties of visceral fat, including decreased thermogenic and increased inflammatory gene expression and increased macrophage accumulation. Transplantation of subcutaneous fat into mice with diet-induced obesity showed a loss of metabolic benefit when tissues were derived from PRDM16 mutant animals. These findings indicate that PRDM16 and beige adipocytes are required for the "browning" of white fat and the healthful effects of subcutaneous adipose tissue.
    Cell 01/2014; 156(1-2):304-16. DOI:10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.021 · 33.12 Impact Factor
  • Evan D Rosen, Bruce M Spiegelman
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    ABSTRACT: There has been an upsurge of interest in the adipocyte coincident with the onset of the obesity epidemic and the realization that adipose tissue plays a major role in the regulation of metabolic function. The past few years, in particular, have seen significant changes in the way that we classify adipocytes and how we view adipose development and differentiation. We have new perspective on the roles played by adipocytes in a variety of homeostatic processes and on the mechanisms used by adipocytes to communicate with other tissues. Finally, there has been significant progress in understanding how these relationships are altered during metabolic disease and how they might be manipulated to restore metabolic health.
    Cell 01/2014; 156(1-2):20-44. DOI:10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.012 · 33.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) regulates metabolic genes in skeletal muscle and contributes to the response of muscle to exercise. Muscle PGC-1α transgenic expression and exercise both increase the expression of thermogenic genes within white adipose. How the PGC-1α-mediated response to exercise in muscle conveys signals to other tissues remains incompletely defined. We employed a metabolomic approach to examine metabolites secreted from myocytes with forced expression of PGC-1α, and identified β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) as a small molecule myokine. BAIBA increases the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes in white adipocytes and β-oxidation in hepatocytes both in vitro and in vivo through a PPARα-mediated mechanism, induces a brown adipose-like phenotype in human pluripotent stem cells, and improves glucose homeostasis in mice. In humans, plasma BAIBA concentrations are increased with exercise and inversely associated with metabolic risk factors. BAIBA may thus contribute to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases.
    Cell metabolism 01/2014; 19(1):96-108. DOI:10.1016/j.cmet.2013.12.003 · 16.75 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

81k Citations
4,829.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1984–2015
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Department of Cancer Biology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1986–2014
    • Harvard Medical School
      • • Department of Cell Biology
      • • Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
      • • Department of Pathology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1985–2014
    • Harvard University
      • Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2007–2012
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Boston University
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011
    • Universität Basel
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
    • University of Pennsylvania
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2004
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • Department of Biological Chemistry
      Los Ángeles, California, United States
  • 1990–2003
    • The Rockefeller University
      • Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 1995–1997
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Ashburn, Virginia, United States
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1996
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Division of Medical Oncology
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 1988
    • Roche Institute of Molecular Biology
      Nutley, New Jersey, United States
    • Tufts University
      Georgia, United States
  • 1981–1982
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      • Department of Biology
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1977–1979
    • Princeton University
      Princeton, New Jersey, United States