I. A. Janssens

University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Flanders, Belgium

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Publications (230)863.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: AimAlthough numerous studies have reported advanced Northern Hemisphere spring phenology since the 1980s, recent studies based on remote sensing have reported a reversal or deceleration of this trend. This study aimed (1) to fully understand recent spring phenology shifts using both in situ observations and satellite-based normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) datasets, and (2) to test whether the NDVI methods capture the trends observed in situ.LocationWestern Central Europe.Methods Temporal spring phenology trends (leaf unfolding dates) were examined using 1,001,678 in situ observations of 31 plant species at 3984 stations, as well as NDVI-based start-of-season dates, obtained using five different methods, across the pixels that included the phenology stations.ResultsIn situ and NDVI observations both indicated that spring phenology significantly advanced during the period 1982–2011 at an average rate of −0.45 days yr−1. This trend was not uniform across the period and significantly weakened over the period 2000–2011. Furthermore, opposite trends were found between in situ and NDVI observations over the period 2000–2011. Averaged over all species, the in situ observations indicated a slower but still advancing trend for leaf unfolding, whereas the NDVI series showed a delayed spring phenology.Main conclusionsThe recent trend reversal in the advancement of spring phenology in western Central Europe is likely to be related to the response of early spring species to the cooling trend in late winter. In contrast, late spring species continued to exhibit advanced leaf unfolding, which is consistent with the warming trend during spring months. Because remote sensing does not distinguish between species, the signal of growing-season onset may only reflect the phenological dynamics of these earliest species in the pixel, even though most species still exhibit advancing trends.
    Global Ecology and Biogeography. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last century the Northern Hemisphere has experienced rapid climate warming, but this warming has not been evenly distributed seasonally, as well as diurnally. The implications of such seasonal and diurnal heterogeneous warming on regional and global vegetation photosynthetic activity, however, are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated for different seasons how photosynthetic activity of vegetation correlates with changes in seasonal daytime and night-time temperature across the Northern Hemisphere (>30°N), using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from 1982 to 2011 obtained from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Our analysis revealed some striking seasonal differences in the response of NDVI to changes in day- versus night-time temperatures. For instance, while higher daytime temperature (Tmax) is generally associated with higher NDVI values across the boreal zone, the area exhibiting a statistically significant positive correlation between Tmax and NDVI is much larger in spring (41% of area in boreal zone – total area 12.6×106 km2) than in summer and autumn (14% and 9%, respectively). In contrast to the predominantly positive response of boreal ecosystems to changes in Tmax, increases in Tmax tended to negatively influence vegetation growth in temperate dry regions, particularly during summer. Changes in night-time temperature (Tmin) correlated negatively with autumnal NDVI in most of the Northern Hemisphere, but had a positive effect on spring and summer NDVI in most temperate regions (e.g., Central North America and Central Asia). Such divergent covariance between the photosynthetic activity of Northern Hemispheric vegetation and day- and night-time temperature changes among different seasons and climate zones suggests a changing dominance of ecophysiological processes across time and space. Understanding the seasonally different responses of vegetation photosynthetic activity to diurnal temperature changes, which have not been captured by current land surface models, is important for improving the performance of next generation regional and global coupled vegetation-climate models.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Global Change Biology 08/2014; · 8.22 Impact Factor
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    C W Xiao, I A Janssens, Y Zhou, J Q Su, Y Liang, B Guenet
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    ABSTRACT: Global climate change has generally increased net primary production which leads to increasing litter inputs. Therefore assessing the impacts of increasing litter inputs on soil nutrients, plant growth and ecological Carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) stoichiometry is critical for an understanding of C, N and P cycling and their feedback 5 processes to climate change. In this study, we added plant litter to the 10–20 cm subsoil layer under a steppe community at rates equivalent to 0, 150, 300, 600 and 1200 g (dry mass) m −2 and measured the resulting C, N and P content of different pools (above and below ground plant biomass, litter, microbial biomass). High litter addition (120 % of the annual litter inputs) significantly increased soil inorganic N and available P, above-10 ground biomass, belowground biomass and litter. Nevertheless small litter additions, which are more realistic compared to the future predictions, had no effect on the vari-ables examined. Our results suggest that while very high litter addition can strongly affect C : N : P stoichiometry, the grassland studied here is quite resilient to more real-istic inputs in terms of stoichiometric functioning. This result highlights the complexity 15 of the ecosystem's response to climate change.
    07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes and their climatic drivers to conditions not yet experienced by the ecosystem. This raises the question to what extent these relationships remain unaltered beyond the current climatic window for which observations are available to constrain the relationships. Here, we evaluate whether current responses of SCE to fluctuations in soil temperature and soil water content can be used to predict SCE under altered rainfall patterns. Of the 58 experiments for which we gathered SCE data, 20 were discarded because either too few data were available, or inconsistencies precluded their incorporation in the analyses. The 38 remaining experiments were used to test the hypothesis that a model parameterized with data from the control plots (using soil temperature and water content as predictor variables) could adequately predict SCE measured in the manipulated treatment. Only for seven of these 38 experiments, this hypothesis was rejected. Importantly, these were the experiments with the most reliable datasets, i.e., those providing high-frequency measurements of SCE. Regression tree analysis demonstrated that our hypothesis could be rejected only for experiments with measurement intervals of less than 11 days, and was not rejected for any of the 24 experiments with larger measurement intervals. This highlights the importance of high-frequency measurements when studying effects of altered precipitation on SCE, probably because infrequent measurement schemes have insufficient capacity to detect shifts in the climate-dependencies of SCE. Hence, the most justified answer to the question whether current moisture responses of SCE can be extrapolated to predict SCE under altered precipitation regimes is ‘no’ – as based on the most reliable datasets available. We strongly recommend that future experiments focus more strongly on establishing response functions across a broader range of precipitation regimes and soil moisture conditions. Such experiments should make accurate measurements of water availability, should conduct high-frequency SCE measurements, and should consider both instantaneous responses and the potential legacy effects of climate extremes. This is important, because with the novel approach presented here, we demonstrated that at least for some ecosystems, current moisture responses could not be extrapolated to predict SCE under altered rainfall conditions.
    Biogeosciences 06/2014; 11:2991-3013. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The traditional view of forest dynamics originated by Kira and Shidei [Kira T, Shidei T (1967) Jap J Ecol 17:70-87] and Odum [Odum EP (1969) Science 164(3877):262-270] suggests a decline in net primary productivity (NPP) in aging forests due to stabilized gross primary productivity (GPP) and continuously increased autotrophic respiration (Ra). The validity of these trends in GPP and Ra is, however, very difficult to test because of the lack of long-term ecosystem-scale field observations of both GPP and Ra. Ryan and colleagues [Ryan MG, Binkley D, Fownes JH (1997) Ad Ecol Res 27:213-262] have proposed an alternative hypothesis drawn from site-specific results that aboveground respiration and belowground allocation decreased in aging forests. Here, we analyzed data from a recently assembled global database of carbon fluxes and show that the classical view of the mechanisms underlying the age-driven decline in forest NPP is incorrect and thus support Ryan's alternative hypothesis. Our results substantiate the age-driven decline in NPP, but in contrast to the traditional view, both GPP and Ra decline in aging boreal and temperate forests. We find that the decline in NPP in aging forests is primarily driven by GPP, which decreases more rapidly with increasing age than Ra does, but the ratio of NPP/GPP remains approximately constant within a biome. Our analytical models describing forest succession suggest that dynamic forest ecosystem models that follow the traditional paradigm need to be revisited.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recent temperature increases have elicited strong phenological shifts in temperate tree species, with subsequent effects on photosynthesis. Here, we assess the impact of advanced leaf flushing in a winter warming experiment on the current year's senescence and next year's leaf flushing dates in two common tree species: Quercus robur L. and Fagus sylvatica L. Results suggest that earlier leaf flushing translated into earlier senescence, thereby partially offsetting the lengthening of the growing season. Moreover, saplings that were warmed in winter-spring 2009-2010 still exhibited earlier leaf flushing in 2011, even though the saplings had been exposed to similar ambient conditions for almost 1 y. Interestingly, for both species similar trends were found in mature trees using a long-term series of phenological records gathered from various locations in Europe. We hypothesize that this long-term legacy effect is related to an advancement of the endormancy phase (chilling phase) in response to the earlier autumnal senescence. Given the importance of phenology in plant and ecosystem functioning, and the prediction of more frequent extremely warm winters, our observations and postulated underlying mechanisms should be tested in other species.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 05/2014; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Climate changes increasingly threaten plant growth and productivity. Such changes are complex and involve multiple environmental factors, including rising CO2 levels and climate extreme events. As the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying plant responses to realistic future climate extreme conditions are still poorly understood, a multiple organizational level-analysis (i.e. eco-physiological, biochemical and transcriptional) was performed, using Arabidopsis exposed to incremental heat wave and water deficit under ambient and elevated CO2. The climate extreme resulted in biomass reduction, photosynthesis inhibition, and considerable increases in stress parameters. Photosynthesis was a major target as demonstrated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. In contrast, the climate extreme treatment induced a protective effect on oxidative membrane damage, most likely as a result of strongly increased lipophilic antioxidants and membrane-protecting enzymes. Elevated CO2 significantly mitigated the negative impact of a combined heat and drought, as apparent in biomass reduction, photosynthesis inhibition, chlorophyll fluorescence decline, H2O2 production and protein oxidation. Analysis of enzymatic and molecular antioxidants revealed that the stress-mitigating CO2 effect operates through up-regulation of antioxidant defense metabolism, as well as by reduced photorespiration resulting in lowered oxidative pressure. Therefore, exposure to future climate extreme episodes will negatively impact plant growth and production, but elevated CO2 is likely to mitigate this effect.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Global Change Biology 05/2014; · 8.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Forests strongly affect climate through the exchange of large amounts of atmospheric CO2. The main drivers of spatial variability in net ecosystem production (NEP) on a global scale are, however, poorly known. As increasing nutrient availability increases the production of biomass per unit of photosynthesis and reduces heterotrophic respiration in forests, we expected nutrients to determine carbon sequestration in forests. Our synthesis study of 92 forests in different climate zones revealed that nutrient availability indeed plays a crucial role in determining NEP and ecosystem carbon-use efficiency (CUEe; that is, the ratio of NEP to gross primary production (GPP)). Forests with high GPP exhibited high NEP only in nutrient-rich forests (CUEe = 33 ± 4%; mean ± s.e.m.). In nutrient-poor forests, a much larger proportion of GPP was released through ecosystem respiration, resulting in lower CUEe (6 ± 4%). Our finding that nutrient availability exerts a stronger control on NEP than on carbon input (GPP) conflicts with assumptions of nearly all global coupled carbon cycle–climate models, which assume that carbon inputs through photosynthesis drive biomass production and carbon sequestration. An improved global understanding of nutrient availability would therefore greatly improve carbon cycle modelling and should become a critical focus for future research.
    Nature Climate Change 04/2014; · 14.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thermal acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is frequently observed and has often been attributed to substrate depletion under warming, but other mechanisms, such as changes in microbial community structure and functioning, have received less attention. In order to determine whether shifts in microbial community structure and functioning are involved in thermal acclimation of SOM decomposition, a laboratory incubation experiment was conducted using an artificial forest soil. Samples were first subjected to different temperatures of 5, 15, and 25 C during a 72-day pre-incubation period and then half of the microcosms from each pre-incubation temperature were incubated at 5 or 25 C for a period of 11 days. Substantial thermal acclimation of SOM decomposition was observed, with the SOM decomposition in soils pre-incubated at higher temperatures being less sensitive to temperature. Along with the reduced temperature sensitivity in response to warming, significant changes in microbial community PLFAs, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and the potential activities of 11 enzymes were also observed. Nevertheless, shifts in microbial community PLFAs and particular enzyme activities provided the most explanatory power for the decreased temperature sensitivity with warming, as revealed by a multivariate regression analysis. The microbial community structure shifts were mainly manifested as an increase in the relative abundance of Gram-positive bacteria and decreases in the relative abundances of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Microbial communities pre-incubated under lower temperatures experienced greater shifts in their structure. Substrate depletion did not occur in this short-term incubation experiment, since neither total organic carbon (TOC) nor dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased with increasing temperature. Our results suggest that shifts in microbial community structure and functioning may underlie the thermal acclimation of SOM decomposition and should be taken into account when predicting the response of soil CO 2 efflux to global warming.
    Soil Biology and Biochemistry 04/2014; 71:1-12. · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lateral transport of carbon plays an important role in linking the carbon cycles of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. There is, however, a lack of information on the factors controlling one of the main C sources of this lateral flux i.e. the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil solution across large spatial scales and under different soil, vegetation and climate conditions. We compiled a database on DOC in soil solution down to 80 cm and analyzed it with the aim, firstly, to quantify the differences in DOC concentrations among terrestrial ecosystems, climate zones, soil and vegetation types at global scale and, secondly, to identify potential determinants of the site-to-site variability of DOC concentration in soil solution across European broadleaved and coniferous forests. We found that DOC concentrations were 75% lower in mineral than in organic soil and temperate sites showed higher DOC concentrations than boreal and tropical sites. The majority of the variation (R2 = 0.67-0.99) in DOC concentrations in mineral European forest soils correlates with NH4+, C/N, Al and Fe as the most important predictors. Overall, our results show that the magnitude (23% lower in broadleaved than in coniferous forests) and the controlling factors of DOC in soil solution differ between forest types, with site productivity being more important in broadleaved forests and water balance in coniferous stands.
    Global Biogeochemical Cycles 04/2014; 28(5):497-509. · 4.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heat requirement, expressed in growing degree days (GDD), is a widely used method to assess and predict the effect of temperature on plant development. Until recently, the analysis of spatial patterns of GDD requirement for spring vegetation green-up onset was limited to local and regional scales, mainly because of the sparse and aggregated spatial availability of ground phenology data. Taking advantage of the large temporal and spatial scales of remote sensing-based green-up onset data, we studied the spatial patterns of GDD requirement for vegetation green-up at northern-middle and high latitudes. We further explored the correlations between GDD requirement for vegetation green-up and previous winter season chilling temperatures and precipitation, using spatial partial correlations. We showed that GDD requirement for vegetation green-up onset declines towards the north at a mean rate of 18.8 ºC-days per degree latitude between 35ºN and 70ºN, and varies significantly among different vegetation types. Our results confirmed that the GDD requirement for vegetation green-up is negatively correlated with previous winter chilling, which was defined as the number of chilling days from the day when the land surface froze in the previous autumn to the day of green-up onset. This negative correlation is a well-known phenomenon from local studies. Interestingly, irrespective of the vegetation type, we also found a positive correlation between the GDD requirement and previous winter season precipitation, which was defined as the sum of the precipitation of the month when green-up onset occur and the precipitation that occurred during the previous two months. Our study suggests that GDD requirement, chilling and precipitation may have complex interactions in their effects on spring vegetation green-up phenology. These findings have important implications for improving phenology models and could therefore advance our understanding of the interplay between spring phenology and carbon fluxes.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Global Change Biology 04/2014; · 8.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration, showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Global Change Biology 04/2014; · 8.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of soil nutrient depletion on crop production has been known for decades, but robust assessments of the impact of increasingly unbalanced nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) application rates on crop production are lacking. Here, we use crop response functions based on 741 FAO maize crop trials and EPIC crop modeling across Africa to examine maize yield deficits resulting from unbalanced N : P applications under low, medium, and high input scenarios, for past (1975), current, and future N : P mass ratios of respectively, 1 : 0.29, 1 : 0.15, and 1 : 0.05. At low N inputs (10 kg ha(-1) ), current yield deficits amount to 10% but will increase up to 27% under the assumed future N : P ratio, while at medium N inputs (50 kg N ha(-1) ), future yield losses could amount to over 40%. The EPIC crop model was then used to simulate maize yields across Africa. The model results showed relative median future yield reductions at low N inputs of 40%, and 50% at medium and high inputs, albeit with large spatial variability. Dominant low-quality soils such as Ferralsols, which are strongly adsorbing P, and Arenosols with a low nutrient retention capacity, are associated with a strong yield decline, although Arenosols show very variable crop yield losses at low inputs. Optimal N : P ratios, i.e. those where the lowest amount of applied P produces the highest yield (given N input) where calculated with EPIC to be as low as 1 : 0.5. Finally, we estimated the additional P required given current N inputs, and given N inputs that would allow Africa to close yield gaps (ca. 70%). At current N inputs, P consumption would have to increase 2.3-fold to be optimal, and to increase 11.7-fold to close yield gaps. The P demand to overcome these yield deficits would provide a significant additional pressure on current global extraction of P resources.
    Global Change Biology 01/2014; · 8.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Key message Stand age, water availability, and the length of the warm period are the most influencing controls of forest structure, functioning, and efficiency. Abstract We aimed to discern the distribution and con-trols of plant biomass, carbon fluxes, and resource-use efficiencies of forest ecosystems ranging from boreal to tropical forests. We analysed a global forest database containing estimates of stand biomass and carbon fluxes (400 and 111 sites, respectively) from which we calculated resource-use efficiencies (biomass production, carbon sequestration, light, and water-use efficiencies). We used the WorldClim climatic database and remote-sensing data derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer to analyse climatic controls of ecosystem functioning. The influences of forest type, stand age, management, and nitrogen deposition were also explored. Tropical forests exhibited the largest gross carbon fluxes (photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration), but rather low net ecosystem production, which peaks in temperate for-ests. Stand age, water availability, and length of the warm period were the main factors controlling forest structure (biomass) and functionality (carbon fluxes and efficien-cies). The interaction between temperature and precipita-tion was the main climatic driver of gross primary production and ecosystem respiration. The mean resource-use efficiency varied little among biomes. The spatial variability of biomass stocks and their distribution among ecosystem compartments were strongly correlated with the variability in carbon fluxes, and both were strongly con-trolled by climate (water availability, temperature) and stand characteristics (age, type of leaf). Gross primary production and ecosystem respiration were strongly cor-related with mean annual temperature and precipitation only when precipitation and temperature were not limiting factors. Finally, our results suggest a global convergence in mean resource-use efficiencies.
    Trees 01/2014; · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims Fine root and aboveground litterfall, two large fluxes of nutrients and carbon in the forest ecosystems, are key processes to be considered in efforts of measuring, modeling and predicting soil carbon sequestration. Methods We used sequential coring and litter trap to measure seasonal dynamics of fine root and litterfall in three Korean pine dominated forests along an altitudinal gradient in the Changbai Mountain during the 2012 growing season. Results Fine root biomass decreased significantly while necromass increased remarkably with altitude. Patterns and amounts of fine root production and mortality varied among forest types. Litterfall decreased significantly with altitude, whereas forest floor mass increased. Carbon inputs through fine root mortality and litterfall decreased significantly with altitude while carbon storage of fine root mass did not differ among forest types and carbon storage of forest floor mass was significantly larger in higher altitudinal forests due to lower turnover rates. Conclusions This study provided an insight into the variations of fine root and litterfall dynamics among three Korean pine forests which were associated with different vegetation traits and environmental conditions, and also the quantification of carbon fluxes through fine root mortality and litterfall for estimating carbon budget of temperate forest.
    Plant and Soil 01/2014; · 3.24 Impact Factor
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    Ecology. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated CO2 concentrations and extreme climate events, are two increasing components of the ongoing global climatic change factors, may alter plant chemical composition and thereby their economic and ecological characteristics, e.g. nutritional quality and decomposition rates. To investigate the impact of climate extremes on tissue quality, four temperate grassland species: the fructan accumulating grasses Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, and the nitrogen (N) fixing legumes Medicago lupulina and Lotus corniculatus were subjected to water deficit at elevated temperature (+3°C), under ambient CO2 (392 ppm) and elevated CO2 (620 ppm). As a general observation, the effects of the climate extreme were larger and more ubiquitous in combination with elevated CO2. The imposed climate extreme increased non-structural carbohydrate and phenolics in all species, whereas it increased lignin in legumes and decreased tannins in grasses. However, there was no significant effect of climate extreme on structural carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and mineral contents and stoichiometric ratios. In combination with elevated CO2, climate extreme elicited larger increases in fructan and sucrose content in the grasses without affecting the total carbohydrate content, while it significantly increased total carbohydrates in legumes. The accumulation of carbohydrates in legumes was accompanied by higher activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase and ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. In the legumes, elevated CO2 in combination with climate extreme reduced protein, phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg) contents and the total element:N ratio and it increased phenol, lignin, tannin, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) contents and C:N, C:P and N:P ratios. On the other hand, the tissue composition of the fructan accumulating grasses was not affected at this level, in line with recent views that fructans contribute to cellular homeostasis under stress. It is speculated that quality losses will be less prominent in grasses (fructan accumulators) than legumes under climate extreme and its combination with elevated CO2 conditions.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(3):e92044. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clay is generally considered an important stabiliser that reduces the rate of decomposition of organic matter (OM) in soils. However, several recent studies have shown trends contradicting this widely held view, emphasising our poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying the clay effects on OM decomposition. Here, an incubation experiment was conducted using artificial soils differing in clay content (0, 5, and 50%) at different temperatures (5, 15, and 25 °C) to determine the effects of clay content, temperature and their interaction on fresh OM decomposition. CO2 efflux was measured throughout the experiment. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), enzyme activities, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were also measured at the end of the pre-incubation and incubation periods in order to follow changes in microbial community structure, functioning, and substrate availability. The results showed that higher clay contents promoted OM decomposition probably by increasing substrate availability and by sustaining a greater microbial biomass, albeit with a different community structure and with higher activities of most of the extracellular enzymes assayed. Higher clay content induced increases in the PLFA contents of all bacterial functional groups relative to fungal PLFA content. However, clay content did not change the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of OM decomposition. The higher substrate availability in the high clay artificial soils sustained more soil microbial biomass, resulting in a different community structure and different functioning. The higher microbial biomass, as well as the changed community structure and functions, accelerated OM decomposition. From these observations, an alternative pathway to understanding the effects of clay on OM decomposition is proposed, in which clay may not only accelerate the decomposition of organic materials in soils but also facilitate the SOM accumulation as microbial products in the long term. Our results highlight the importance of clay content as a control over OM decomposition and greater attention is required to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.
    Soil Biology and Biochemistry 01/2014; 77:100–108. · 4.41 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
863.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2014
    • University of Antwerp
      • Department of Biology
      Antwerpen, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2012
    • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
    • Technical University of Denmark
      • Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
      Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2011
    • University of Udine
      Udine, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy
  • 2006
    • Woods Hole Research Center
      Falmouth, Massachusetts, United States