Shoichi Mizuno

Shiga University of Medical Science, Ōtu, Shiga, Japan

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Publications (57)99.7 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the age differences in the risk of diabetes incidence according to body mass index (BMI).Methods: For an average of 10.3 years, this study prospectively followed a cohort of 4725 women aged 30–69 years without diabetes at a baseline health check-up conducted between April 1990 and March 1992. Diabetes onset was identified by fasting and random plasma glucose level, HbA1c or the medical treatment for diabetes by questionnaire. We stratified the subjects according to age (30–39, 40–49, 50–59 and 60–69 years), and calculated the risk of diabetes incidence according to BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5–22.9, 23.0–24.9 and ≥25.0 kg/m(2)) using the Cox proportional hazards model.Results: During 48,866 person-years of follow-up, 392 subjects developed diabetes. Using the normal group as the reference, the HR (95% CI) for diabetes incidence was elevated in obese women of all ages, ranging from a high of 4.72 (1.79–12.40) for women who were 30–39 years of age, to a low of 1.54 (1.02–2.33) for those who were 50–59 years of age.Conclusions: The risk of diabetes incidence according to BMI is different among different age groups of Japanese women. Obese is a strong risk factor for diabetes incidence among women of all ages, and especially among young adults.
    Obesity Research & Clinical Practice 12/2013; 7(6):e431-500. · 0.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims/IntroductionThe inverse association between soybean intake and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported. We investigated the effects of soybean product intake on the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus considering fasting and postload hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods The present 4-year, cohort study included 1,738 men and 1,301 women, aged 30–69 years, without diabetes mellitus at baseline who underwent comprehensive medical check-ups between April 2006 and March 2007 at Saku Central Hospital. Participants were stratified by sex and body mass index (BMI), and further classified into three groups based on soybean product intake: group 1 (0–1 time/week), group 2 (2–3 times/week) and group 3 (four or more times per week). Participants underwent annual standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance testing during follow-up periods until March 2011. Main outcomes were incidence of fasting hyperglycemia, postload hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. ResultsDuring 10,503 person-years of follow up, 204 participants developed type 2 diabetes mellitus, including 61 who developed fasting hyperglycemia and 147 who developed postload hyperglycemia. Among men with a high BMI, group 3 had significantly lower risk for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, fasting hyperglycemia and postload hyperglycemia than group 1, and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 0.44 (0.22–0.89), 0.36 (0.15–0.96) and 0.40 (0.18–0.92), respectively. Similar results were not observed among men with low BMI or women. Conclusions Soybean product intake prevented fasting and postload hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men with a high BMI. Further long-term observation is necessary.
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation. 11/2013; 4(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To establish body mass index (BMI) percentile curves for adults and to compare these in 1980 with those in 2005 among Japanese men and women.Methods: Participants included 8080 community residents aged 20–79 years who had a health check-up in 1980 and 5616 community residents aged 20–79 years who had a health check-up in 2005. Sex-specific percentile curves for BMI were constructed using the LMS method. We presented the 3rd, 5th, 15th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 95th, and 97th percentile curves.Results: From 1980 to 2005, the BMI percentile values of men increased, especially the 95th and 97th percentile values in men aged 20–39 years. The BMI distribution of young men in 2005 was wider than that in 1980. From 1980 to 2005, the 50th percentile values of women in 2005 were lower than those in 1980. However, the 95th percentile values of women increased among women aged less than 50 years.Conclusion: We were able to confirm the existence of BMI percentile values depending on date, age, and sex by establishing BMI percentile curves.
    Obesity Research & Clinical Practice 09/2013; 7(5):e321-430. · 0.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To assess the impact of impaired insulin secretion (IIS) and insulin resistance (IR) on type 2 diabetes incidence in a Japanese population. METHODS: This 4 year cohort study included 3,059 participants aged 30-69 without diabetes at baseline who underwent comprehensive medical check-ups between April 2006 and March 2007 at Saku Central Hospital. Based on their insulinogenic index and HOMA-IR values, participants were classified by the criteria of the Japan Diabetes Society into four categories: normal; isolated IIS (i-IIS); isolated IR (i-IR); and IIS plus IR. They were followed up until March 2011. The incidence of type 2 diabetes was determined from fasting and 2 h post-load plasma glucose concentrations and from receiving medical treatment for diabetes. RESULTS: At baseline, 1,550 individuals (50.7%) were classified as normal, 900 (29.4%) i-IIS, 505 (16.5%) i-IR, and 104 (3.4%) IIS plus IR. During 10,553 person-years of follow-up, 219 individuals developed type 2 diabetes, with 126 (57.5%) having i-IIS at baseline. Relative to the normal group, the multivariable-adjusted HRs for type 2 diabetes in the i-IIS, i-IR and IIS plus IR groups were 8.27 (95% CI 5.33, 12.83), 4.90 (95% CI 2.94, 8.17) and 16.93 (95% CI 9.80, 29.25), respectively. The population-attributable fractions of type 2 diabetes onset due to i-IIS, i-IR, and IIS plus IR were 50.6% (95% CI 46.7%, 53.0%), 14.2% (95% CI 11.8%, 15.6%) and 12.9% (95% CI 12.3%, 13.2%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Compared with IR, IIS had a greater impact on the incidence of type 2 diabetes in a Japanese population.
    Diabetologia 05/2013; · 6.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the impact of smoking on impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance in Japanese men.
    Journal of diabetes investigation. 05/2013; 4(3):274-80.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to examine the association between lifestyle and risk for diabetes. For an average of 9.9 years, this study prospectively followed a cohort of 7,211 (2,524 men and 4,687 women) community residents aged 30-69 years without diabetes at a health check-up conducted between April 1990 and March 1992 until diabetes was confirmed or until the end of 2006. The subjects were divided into 6 groups according to their total scores of Breslow's lifestyle index (1-2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 points). The association between lifestyle and diabetes incidence was investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. The results showed that the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.45 in subjects who scored 5 points, 0.39 in subjects who scored 6 points, and 0.31 in subjects who scored 7 points, compared with subjects who scored 1-2 points. These data indicate that the healthy behaviors prevent the incidence of diabetes.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 05/2012; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the impact of smoking cessation on incidence of diabetes among overweight or normal-weight Japanese men. This 9.2-year cohort study included 2070 men aged 40-69 years without diabetes. We classified them according to smoking status as non-smokers, past smokers (>9, 6-9, 3-5 and <3 years) and current smokers. Participants were followed up until diabetes developed or the end of 2006. The incidence of diabetes was determined from fasting and random plasma glucose levels, HbA(1c) levels or being under medical treatment for diabetes. During 18,963 person-years of follow-up, 246 of the participants developed diabetes. The risk for diabetes peaked within 3 years of quitting (HR: 2.98, 95% CI: 1.38-6.27) and persisted at 5 years after quitting smoking (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18-5.26) among overweight individuals. Moreover, this study identified a high risk for diabetes among past smokers who had quit >9 years in both normal weight and overweight. Cigarette smoking predicts incidence of diabetes, but smoking cessation leads to higher short-term risk in overweight and long-term risk in both. Preventing smoking is superior to smoking cessation, and is very important for avoiding diabetes.
    Diabetes research and clinical practice 04/2012; 96(3):407-13. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the risk of smoking, body mass index (BMI), and both for incidence of diabetes in a rural Japanese population. This study was a 10.1-year cohort study of 2070 men and 3802 women aged 40-69 years without diabetes at baseline who underwent a health check-up at one central hospital in Nagano Prefecture. Participants were classified according to a combination of smoking status and BMI. Participants were followed from 1990 to 2006. The incidence of diabetes was determined from fasting and random levels of plasma glucose, HbA(1c) levels or being under medical treatment for diabetes. Diabetes developed in 595 of the participants during 59,111 person-years of follow-up. In men, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for incidence of diabetes compared with non-smokers of normal weight were as follows: 3.36 (2.02-5.60) in current smokers with normal weight and 1.70 (0.87-3.34) and 3.93 (2.22-6.96) in obese non-smokers and obese current smokers, respectively. In men the population-attributable fraction of diabetes onset due to current smoking, obesity and both were 22.0%, 2.5% and 11.2%, respectively. Regardless of BMI, smoking is an important risk factor for diabetes in male populations with a high prevalence of smoking.
    Preventive Medicine 03/2012; 54(5):341-4. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study assessed the effects of dietary habits and other lifestyle factors on the incidence of diabetes in a rural Japanese population. This 10.3-year study investigated a cohort of 1,995 men and 3,670 women aged 40-69 years without diabetes at baseline who underwent health check-ups between April 1990 and March 1992. Participants were followed up until diabetes was confirmed or until the end of 2006. The incidence of diabetes was determined from fasting and random levels of plasma glucose, HbA1c levels or being under medical treatment for diabetes. Principal component analysis identified a major dietary pattern characterized by more frequent consumption of vegetables, potatoes, seaweeds, fruits and soybean products that we labeled "healthy". Diabetes developed in 446 of the participants during 58,151 person-years of follow-up. Consuming a healthy diet was associated with a lower risk of diabetes (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for highest vs lowest quartiles, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.61- 0.95]. In addition, scores for a healthy diet were associated with a lower risk for diabetes among persons who consumed regular meals (0.76 [0.58-0.96]), persons with an exercise habit (0.65 [0.44-0.96]) and non- and exsmokers (0.72 [0.53-0.96]). Our findings suggest that consuming a healthy diet is associated with a lower risk for diabetes among the Japanese, particularly among those who eat regularly, those who habitually exercise and nonand ex-smokers.
    Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 01/2012; 21(4):601-8. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An abstract is unavailable. This article is available as HTML full text and PDF.
    Journal of Hypertension 01/2011; 29(2):401–402. · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reported effects of different soy products on blood pressure vary. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to clarify the effects of soy isoflavone extract supplements on systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) in adult humans. PubMed, CENTRAL, ICHUSHI, and CNKI were searched in June 2009 for relevant randomized placebo-controlled trials. Study data and indicators of methodological validity were independently extracted by two authors using predefined data fields. Meta-analysis was carried out in Review Manager 5.0.22. Searches identified 3740 articles, of which 14 randomized controlled trials (789 participants) were included. Daily ingestion of 25-375 mg soy isoflavones (aglycone equivalents) for 2-24 weeks significantly decreased SBP by 1.92 mmHg (95% confidence interval -3.45 to -0.39; P = 0.01) compared with placebo (heterogeneity P = 0.39, fixed effect model) in adults with normal blood pressure and prehypertension. The effect was not lost on sensitivity analysis. Subgroup analyses suggest greater effects in studies longer than 3 months, in Western populations, at lower doses, and in studies at lower risk of bias. Soy isoflavones did not affect DBP [-0.13 (95% confidence interval -1.03 to 0.78) mmHg, P = 0.78; heterogeneity P = 0.20, fixed effect model]. Soy isoflavone extracts significantly decreased SBP but not DBP in adult humans, and no dose-response relationship was observed. Further studies are needed to address factors related to the observed effects of soy isoflavones on SBP and to verify the effect in hypertensive patients.
    Journal of Hypertension 10/2010; 28(10):1971-82. · 4.22 Impact Factor
  • Atherosclerosis Supplements 06/2010; 11(2):212-212. · 9.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effects of soy isoflavone supplements on bone turnover markers remain unclear. This up-to-date systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed primarily to more completely and precisely clarify the effects on urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) and serum bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and secondarily to evaluate the effects on other bone turnover markers, compared with placebo in menopausal women. PubMed, CENTRAL, ICHUSHI, and CNKI were searched in June 2009 for relevant studies of RCTs. Data on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes were extracted and methodological quality of each included trial was assessed. From 3740 identified relevant articles, 10 (887 participants), 10 (1210 participants), and 8 (380 participants) RCTs were selected for meta-analysis of effects on DPD, BAP, and serum osteocalcin (OC), respectively, using Review Manager 5.0.22. Daily ingestion of an average 56 mg soy isoflavones (aglycone equivalents) for 10 weeks to 12 months significantly decreased DPD by 14.1% (95% CI: -26.8% to -1.5%; P=0.03) compared to baseline (heterogeneity: P<0.00001; I(2)=93%; random effects model). The overall effect of soy isoflavones on DPD compared with placebo was a significant decrease of -18.0% (95% CI: -28.4% to -7.7%, P=0.0007; heterogeneity: P=0.0001; I(2)=73%; random effects model). Subgroup analyses and meta-regressions revealed that isoflavone dose and intervention duration did not significantly relate to the variable effects on DPD. Daily supplementation of about 84 mg and 73 mg of soy isoflavones for up to 12 months insignificantly increased BAP by 8.0% (95% CI: -4.2% to 20.2%, P=0.20; heterogeneity: P<0.00001; I(2)=98%) and OC by 10.3% (95% CI: -3.1% to 23.7%, P=0.13; heterogeneity: P=0.002; I(2)=69%) compared with placebo (random effects model), respectively. Soy isoflavone supplements moderately decreased the bone resorption marker DPD, but did not affect bone formation markers BAP and OC in menopausal women. The effects varied between studies, and further studies are needed to address factors relating to the observed effects of soy isoflavones on DPD and to verify effects on other bone turnover markers.
    Bone 05/2010; 47(2):413-23. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to clarify the effect of ingesting soy isoflavone extracts (not soy protein or foods containing isoflavones) on bone mineral density (BMD) in menopausal women. PubMed, CENTRAL, ICHUSHI, CNKI, Wanfang Data, CQVIP, and NSTL were searched for randomized controlled trials published in English, Japanese, or Chinese reporting the effects of soy isoflavone extracts on lumbar spine or hip BMD in menopausal women. Trials were identified and reviewed for inclusion and exclusion eligibility. Data on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes were extracted. Eleven, seven, five, and five trials were finally selected for estimation of the effects on spine, femoral neck, hip total, and trochanter BMD, respectively. Meta-analysis including data from1240 menopausal women revealed that daily ingestion of an average of 82 (47-150) mg soy isoflavones (aglycone equivalent) for 6-12 months significantly increased spine BMD by 22.25 mg/cm2 (95% CI: 7.62, 32.89; p=0.002), or by 2.38% (95% CI: 0.93, 3.83; p=0.001) compared with controls (random-effects model). Subgroup analyses indicated that the varying effects of isoflavones on spine BMD across trials might be associated with study characteristics of intervention duration (6 vs. 12 months), region of participant (Asian vs. Western), and basal BMD (normal bone mass vs. osteopenia or osteoporosis). No significant effects on femoral neck, hip total, and trochanter BMD were found. Soy isoflavone extract supplements increased lumbar spine BMD in menopausal women. Further studies are needed to address factors affecting the magnitudes of effect on spine and to verify the effect on hip.
    Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 01/2010; 19(1):33-42. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 109 Objective: To elucidate the effects of sea salt and various other soap ingredients on skin in humans. Methods: Forty healthy women (age 30.4 ± 6.0 years) were assigned to one of four test-soap groups (sea salt, SS; collagen added, SS+C; humic added, SS+H; or, fucoidan added, SS+F) or a control group. Subjects washed their face with the soap twice daily for eight weeks. Before and after the study, subjects undertook the Anti-Aging QOL Common Questionnaire (AAQol), skin image analysis (VISIAII), elasticity tests by a Cutometer (MPA580), and moisture tests by a Corneometer (CM825). Results: At 8 weeks, significant improvements were seen in symptoms scores for "noticeable blackheads in pores" and "oily face" in the SS group, the score for "concerned about spots or freckles" in the SS+H group, and the scores for "noticeable pores", "concerned about pore opening", "dry skin", "rough skin", "concerned about rough skin", and "corner of eyes sagging" in the SS+F group. There was no significant change in skin moisture. Compared to controls, the R2 index of skin elasticity showed improvement in the SS+C group by inter-group analysis (p=0.009). On skin image analysis, the number of face wrinkles bilaterally (- 26.6%, p=0.008) in the SS+F group and the number of wrinkles on the right side of the face (- 45.5%, p=0.005) in the SS group) showed significant improvement. Although an increase in ultraviolet (UV) spots was seen in the SS and control groups, this increase was significantly attenuated in the SS+C group (inter-group analysis: p
    ANTI-AGING MEDICINE 01/2009; 6(12):109-118.
  • ANTI-AGING MEDICINE 01/2009; 6(5):22-31.
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    ABSTRACT: Equol, a metabolite of the isoflavone daidzein, is hypothesized to play a major role in the health benefits of soy. We examined the effect of a new S-equol supplement on menopausal symptoms and mood states. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with our new equol supplement for 12 weeks with 134 Japanese women (aged 40-59 years). They were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo (n = 44), 10 mg of equol per day (EQ-1; n = 44), and 10 mg of equol three times per day (EQ-3; n = 46). Habitual isoflavone intake was limited to 20 mg/d. Participants completed menopausal symptom and Profile of Mood States questionnaires at baseline and postintervention. Physical examination and blood and 24-hour urine collection were performed at baseline and postintervention. At baseline, total menopausal symptom score varied by menopausal and equol producer status (34.3% producers). A total of 127 participants (94.8%) completed the trial. No adverse effects were reported, except for a systemic rash in one EQ-3 woman. The anxiety scores of equol producers were lower than those of nonproducers (P < 0.05). Significant differences between premenopausal and perimenopausal/postmenopausal symptom scores were observed for anxiety, somatic, and total scores. After the EQ-3 intervention, perimenopausal/postmenopausal equol nonproducers showed significant decreases from baseline in all menopausal symptom scores except depression (P < 0.01). Compared with placebo, the EQ-3 group showed significant decreases in depression scores (P < 0.05), as well as significant decreases in Tension-Anxiety (P < 0.05), Depression-Dejection (P < 0.05) and Fatigue (P < 0.01) and increases in Vigor (P < 0.05) of the Profile of Mood States. S-equol supplement improved mood-related symptoms in perimenopausal/postmenopausal equol nonproducers.
    Menopause (New York, N.Y.) 01/2009; 16(1):141-8. · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is limited information on the health effects of radon in drinking water in spite of their potential exposures. We conducted an ecological study in a small town in Japan where the groundwater with high concentrations of radon is supplied as utilities. A total of 607 cancer deaths were ascertained by vital statistics in that town from 1972 to 1997. Standardized mortality ratios on the basis of national rates were 1.01 (95% confidence interval; 0.93-1.09) for all cancers, 1.10 (0.95-1.28) for stomach cancer, 0.88 (0.70-1.10) for lung cancer, and 1.14 (0.87-1.48) for liver cancer. Mortality from liver cancer was significantly higher than that of two surrounding control cities combined, with a relative risk of 1.40 (1.04-1.89) based on Poisson regression analysis. Lack of information on possible confounders including diet, alcohol drinking, smoking and hepatitis virus infection, is the main limitation of the study, which precludes the evaluation of causal associations.
    01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate cancer incidence data are needed to plan, monitor and evaluate national cancer control programs. In Japan, however, such information is not available owing to incomplete cancer registries. In order to attain incidence estimation adjusted to account for this incomplete information, we have developed a new method. We developed a nonlinear regression model between observed incidence/mortality ratios and proportions of death certificate notification to observed incidence in various cancer registries. This model enables us to obtain the 'true incidence/mortality ratio', which, in the regression curve, is at zero point for the proportion of death certificate notifications. This is an ideal registration state without any missing cases. By multiplying it by the number of cancer mortalities from the National Vital Statistics, corrected cancer incidence can be estimated. Applying this method for the estimation of the Japanese cancer incidence in 1997, we obtained the 'true incidence/mortality ratios' of 2.074 for men and 2.587 for women. Cancer incidences in Japan for 1997 were thus estimated to be 346,000 for men and 280,000 for women. A new method is proposed to estimate the national cancer incidence after adjusting for completeness of cancer registries. This method enables us to more accurately estimate the cancer incidence in a country where several cancer registries exist with various degrees of completeness of registration.
    Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology 03/2007; 37(2):150-5. · 1.75 Impact Factor
  • ANTI-AGING MEDICINE 01/2007; 4(2):51-56.

Publication Stats

470 Citations
99.70 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Shiga University of Medical Science
      Ōtu, Shiga, Japan
    • Saku Central Hospital
      Сакура, Chiba, Japan
  • 2012–2013
    • Osaka University
      • • Division of Mathematical Health Science
      • • Department of Integrated Medicine
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2010–2013
    • National Institute of Health and Nutrition
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2009
    • Atomi College
      Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • 2003–2007
    • Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1991–2007
    • National Cancer Center, Japan
      • Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2002
    • Nagoya University
      • Department of Quantum Engineering
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 1989–1990
    • Radiation Effects Research Foundation
      Hirosima, Hiroshima, Japan