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Publications (7)25.43 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Little data exist about the quality of care for HIV-infected subjects in Germany. We investigated the clinical course of HIV-infected subjects newly presenting in our HIV outpatient clinic.
    Infection 06/2014; · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Causes of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects have changed in countries with high resources over the last several years. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related diseases have become less prevalent, whereas deaths due to non-AIDS causes are increasing. The aim of the present study was to analyse causes of death in the Cologne-Bonn cohort. Causes of death from the Cologne-Bonn cohort between 2004 and 2010 were systematically recorded using the CoDe algorithm (The Coding Causes of Death in HIV Project). In 3,165 patients followed from 2004 to 2010, 182 deaths occurred (5.7 %, 153 males, 29 females). The median age at the time of death was 47 years (range 24-85 years). The most frequent causes of death were AIDS-defining events (n = 60, 33 %), with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (n = 29, 16 %) and infections (n = 20, 11 %) being the leading entities in this category. Non-AIDS malignancies accounted for 16 % (n = 29), non-HIV-related infections for 10 % (n = 18), cardiovascular diseases for 7 % (n = 14), suicide or accident for 4 % (n = 7) and liver diseases for 3 % (n = 5) of deaths (unknown n = 47, 26 %). Although the majority of patients (92.5 %) was on antiretroviral therapy (ART), only 50 % were virologically suppressed (HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL) and 44 % had a decreased CD4+ count (<200/μL) at their last visit before death. One-third of the causes of death in our cohort between 2004 and 2010 was AIDS-related. Since most of these deaths occur with severe immune suppression, they can possibly be prevented by the early diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection. Care providers must be aware of an increased risk for a broad range of diseases in HIV-infected patients and should apply appropriate preventive measures.
    Infection 10/2013; · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate a newly implemented infectious disease (ID) consultation service in terms of patient care, outcome and antibiotic prescription and to describe factors influencing adherence to recommendations. Data from consultations during the first 6 months of the ID consultation program were collected and evaluated. Consultation requests, diagnostic results, treatment outcomes and antibiotic recommendations were categorised. Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations were assessed and rated for adherence and outcome. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors influencing adherence and treatment outcome. A total of 251 consultations were assessed. In most cases, ID specialists were asked for further advice regarding a previously initiated anti-infective treatment (N = 131, 52 %). In 54 of 195 (28 %) first consultations, the ID specialist proposed a differential diagnosis that differed from that of the working diagnoses submitted with the consultation request, and which was subsequently confirmed in 80 % of these cases. Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations were made in 190 (76 %) and 240 (96 %) of the consultations, respectively. A change in the current treatment was recommended in 66 % of consultations; 37 % of recommendations were cost-saving and 26 % were cost-neutral. Compliance with diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations was rated as good by pre-specified criteria in 65 and 86 % of consultations, respectively. Treatment outcome was correlated with adherence to diagnostic recommendations (P = 0.012). Twenty-nine patients (16 %) died during the same hospital stay. Infectious disease consultations may help to establish the correct diagnosis, resulting in the appropriate treatment being provided to a severely sick patient population. Treatment outcome was improved in cases of good diagnostic adherence to the recommendations of the ID specialist.
    Infection 08/2013; · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Out of 302 AIDS-related lymphoma (ARL) patients enrolled in the German ARL cohort study, 18 patients had plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Twelve out of 18 patients (67%) have died with a median survival of 4 months (range 0-11 months). In univariate analysis, an intermediate or high international prognostic index score was associated with a significantly lower overall survival and progression-free survival. The predominant cause of death was progressive lymphoma (67%). Our data indicate that the outcome of AIDS-related PBL is still very poor.
    AIDS (London, England) 03/2013; 27(5):842-845. · 4.91 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of Infectious Diseases 02/2013; · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Liver involvement in syphilis has been studied in cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative individuals despite the scarcity of data on such HIV-infected patients. Th aim of this study was to assess hepatic involvement of HIV-infected patients diagnosed with syphilis. Patients with syphilis and liver involvement, including all stages of syphilis, were systematically identified in our HIV cohort between 2004 and 2008. Of the 1,599 HIV-infected patients identified during the study period, 100 were diagnosed with acute syphilis, all of whom were male. Of these 100 patients, 84 % were men who have sex with men. Laboratory parameters of liver involvement were present in 19 of the 100 HIV-infected patients with syphilis; these resolved after successful antibiotic treatment. Among these 19 patients, six were diagnosed to be in the latent stage, with elevated liver enzymes and parameters of inflammation representing the only distinctive feature. Based on our results, syphilis should be included in the differential diagnosis of increased liver enzymes in HIV-infected patients.
    Infection 04/2012; 40(5):543-7. · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AIDS-related lymphomas (ARLs) significantly contribute to mortality in HIV-infected patients. Optimal chemotherapy treatment and the use of rituximab remain controversial. The aim of the present cohort study was to analyze the outcome of HIV-infected patients diagnosed with ARL, with regard to the use of rituximab, clinical characteristics and histopathological markers. This observational uncontrolled multicenter cohort study included 163 HIV-infected patients with ARL diagnosed between January 2005 and December 2008 in Germany. Patients with CD20-positive ARL had a significantly better overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than patients with CD20-negative ARL [hazard ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15-0.53 and hazard ratio 0.29, 95% CI 0.16-0.53]. In CD20-positive cases, the use of rituximab was associated with better OS and PFS (n = 128, hazard ratio 0.48, 95% CI 0.25-0.93 and hazard ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.26-0.86), even in patients with severe immune deficiency at ARL diagnosis (CD4 T-cell count<100 cells/μl, n = 33; OS: hazard ratio 0.25, 95% CI 0.07-0.90). In multivariate analysis, CD4 T-cell counts more than 100 cells/μl and the use of rituximab were associated with better OS and PFS. In total, there were 12 polychemotherapy-associated deaths, which were not related to specific therapy regimens or to the use of rituximab. In patients with CD20-positive ARL, CD4 T-cell count at ARL diagnosis and the use of rituximab had strong impact on survival. Rituximab was beneficial in ARL even in the setting of severe immune deficiency and was not associated with an increased risk of fatal infections.
    AIDS (London, England) 11/2011; 26(4):457-64. · 4.91 Impact Factor