Ge. G. Samsonidze

University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States

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Publications (79)194.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The D band Raman intensity is calculated for armchair edged graphene nanoribbons using an extended tight-binding method in which the effect of interactions up to the seventh nearest neighbor is taken into account. The possibility of a double resonance Raman process with multiple scattering events is considered by calculating a T matrix through a direct diagonalization of the nanoribbon Hamiltonian. We show that long-range interactions play an important role in the evaluation of both the D band intensity and that the main effect of multiple scattering events on the calculated D band is an overall increase in intensity by a factor of 4. The D band intensity is shown to be independent of the nanoribbon widths for widths larger than 17 nm, leading to the well-known linear dependence of the ID/IG ratio on the inverse of the crystalline size. The D band intensity was shown to be nearly independent of the laser excitation energy and to have a maximum value for incident and scattering photons polarized along the direction of the edge.
    Physical Review B 06/2011; 83(24). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.83.245435 · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we report the effects of strain on the electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes and its consequence on the resonant Raman cross section. A quantum interference effect has been predicted for the radial breathing mode spectra for metallic tubes. For metallic tubes, the lower and upper components of Eii resulting from the trigonal warping effect are affected differently and for low chiral angle they cross for some strain value. Near (at) the crossing point, the resonant Raman spectra profile exhibits a maximum (minimum) value due to a quantum interference in the Raman cross section. This Raman cross section interference effect was observed in Raman experiments carried out on isolated SWNTs. The Raman experiment performed on an isolated strained metallic SWNT supports our modeling predictions.
    MRS Online Proceeding Library 01/2011; 901. DOI:10.1557/PROC-0901-Rb24-04
  • MRS Online Proceeding Library 01/2011; 858. DOI:10.1557/PROC-858-HH13.13
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    ABSTRACT: High resolution far infrared absorption measurements were carried out for single walled and double walled carbon nanotubes samples (SWCNT and DWCNT) encased in a polyethylene matrix to investigate the temperature and bundling effects on the low frequency phonons associated with the low frequency circumferential vibrations. At a temperature where kBT is significantly lower than the phonon energy, the broad absorption features as observed at room temperature become well resolved phonon transitions. For a DWCNT sample whose inner tubes have a similar diameter distribution as the SWCNT sample studied, a series of sharp features were observed at room temperature at similar positions as for the SWCNT samples studied. The narrow linewidth is attributed to the fact that the inner tubes are isolated from the polyethylene matrix and the weak inter-tubule interactions. More systematic studies will be required to better understand the effects of inhomogeneous broadening and thermal-excitation on the detailed position and lineshape of the low frequency phonon features in carbon nanotubes.
    MRS Online Proceeding Library 12/2010; 1284. DOI:10.1557/opl.2011.365
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    ABSTRACT: In this work we investigate the presence of a torsional instability in single-wall carbon nanotubes which causes small diameter chiral carbon nanotubes to show natural torsion. To obtain insight into the nature of this instability, the natural torsion is calculated using an extended tight-binding model and is found to decrease as the inverse cube of the diameter. The dependence of the natural torsion on chiral angle is found to be different for metallic and semiconducting nanotubes, specially for near-armchair nanotubes, for which the behavior of semiconducting nanotubes deviates from the simple sin(6 theta) behavior observed for metallic nanotubes. The presence of this natural torsion implies a revision of the calculation of the chiral angle of the nanotubes.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 04/2010; 81(16):165430. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.81.165430 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We performed Raman spectroscopy experiments on undoped and boron-doped double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) that exhibit the “coalescence inducing mode” as these DWNTs are heat treated to temperatures between 1200 °C and 2000 °C. The fact that boron doping promotes DWNT coalescence at lower temperatures allowed us to study in greater detail the behavior of first- and second-order Raman modes as a function of temperature with regard to the coalescence process. Furthermore, by using various excitation laser energies we probed DWNTs with different metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) inner and outer tubes. We find that regardless of their M and S configurations, the smaller diameter nanotubes disappear at a faster rate than their larger diameter counterparts as the heat treatment temperature is increased. We also observe that the frequency of the G band is mostly determined by the diameter of the semiconducting layer of those DWNTs that are in resonance with the laser excitation energy. Finally, we explain the contributions to the G′ band from the inner and outer layers of a DWNT. NSF/DMR Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan Fondo Mixto de Puebla SALUD-CONACYT MIT-CONACYT Inter American Collaboration CONACYT Mexico
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 07/2009; 80(3). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.80.035419 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We used micro‐Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy to study variations of the Raman spectrum as a function of the number of graphene layers. Samples were prepared by micromechanical cleaving of natural graphite on a ∼ 300‐nm SiO2 layer. The variations of Raman G band ( ∼ 1,580 cm−1), G∗ band ( ∼ 2,450 cm−1), and 2D band ( ∼ 2,700 cm−1) were observed as a function of the number of graphene layers. Raman 2D band is especially sensitive to the number of graphene layers. These features are related to the electronic band structure of graphene. Moreover, the areas of different number of graphene layers were clearly identified using spatially resolved micro‐Raman imaging spectroscopy. Polarized micro‐Raman spectroscopy on single‐layer graphene shows strong polarization dependences of double‐resonance Raman intensities. The Raman intensity of the double‐resonant 2D band is maximum when the excitation and detection polarizations are parallel and minimum when they are orthogonal, whereas that of the G band is isotropic. A calculation shows that this strong polarization dependence is a direct consequence of inhomogeneous optical absorption and emission mediated by electron‐phonon interactions involved in the second‐order Stokes‐Stokes Raman scattering process.
    04/2009; 1119(1):232-232. DOI:10.1063/1.3137857
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    Physical Review B 01/2009; · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the dispersion of the longitudinal acoustic (LA) and in-plane transverse optic phonon branches near the Dirac K point of monolayer graphene from the analysis of the dispersion of two second-order Raman peaks involving the LA and TO phonons. We show that the velocities of the phonons involved in the double resonance Raman process are given by vLA=7.70×10-3vF and vTO=5.47×10-3vF , where vF is the Fermi velocity of the associated electrons. The experimental results for the phonon dispersion in monolayer graphene are compared with those for turbostratic graphite and also with different theoretical models.
    Physical Review B 12/2007; 76(23-23). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.76.233407 · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    H Farhat · H Son · Ge G Samsonidze · S Reich · M S Dresselhaus · J Kong
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    ABSTRACT: We have studied the line shape and frequency of the G band Raman modes in individual metallic single walled carbon nanotubes (M-SWNTs) as a function of Fermi level (epsilonF) position, by tuning a polymer electrolyte gate. Our study focuses on the data from M-SWNTs where explicit assignment of the G- and G+ peaks can be made. The frequency and line shape of the G- peak in the Raman spectrum of M-SWNTs is very sensitive to the position of the Fermi level. Within +/- variant Planck's over 2piomega/2 (where variant Planck's over 2piomega is the phonon energy) around the band crossing point, the G- mode is softened and broadened. In contrast, as the Fermi level is tuned away from the band crossing point, a semiconductinglike G band line shape is recovered both in terms of frequency and linewidth. Our results confirm the predicted softening of the A-symmetry LO phonon mode frequency due to a Kohn anomaly in M-SWNTs.
    Physical Review Letters 11/2007; 99(14):145506. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.145506 · 7.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this work, we performed a detailed study of the Raman spectra of double-wall carbon nanotube DWNT bucky paper samples. The effects of H 2 SO 4 doping on the electronic and vibrational properties of the DWNTs are analyzed and compared to the corresponding effects on single-wall carbon nanotubes SWNTs. Analysis of the radial breathing mode RBM Raman spectra indicates that the resonance condition for the outer wall nanotubes and the SWNTs are almost the same, indicating that the effect of the inner-outer wall interaction on the transition energies of the outer walls is weak compared to the width of the resonance window for the RBM peaks. The effect of H 2 SO 4 on the RBM frequencies of the outer wall of the DWNTs is stronger for larger diameter nanotubes. In the case of the inner walls, only the metallic nanotubes were affected by the acid treatment, while the RBM peaks for the inner semiconducting nanotubes remained almost unchanged in both frequency and intensity. The G + band was seen to upshift in frequency with H 2 SO 4 doping for both DWNTs and SWNTs. However, the effect of the acid treatment on the G − band frequency for DWNTs was opposite to that of SWNTs in the 2.05– 2.15 eV range, for which the acid treatment causes a G − upshift for SWNTs and a downshift for DWNTs. The G band line shape of the DWNTs is explained in terms of four contributions from different components which are in resonance with the laser excitation. Two of these peaks are more related to the inner wall nanotube while the other two are more related to the outer wall.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 07/2007; 76(4-045425):045425. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.76.045425 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this work, we present a detailed Raman spectroscopy study of graphitic foams probing the spatial and laser excitation energy dependences of the double resonance Raman peaks. We have observed a spatial dependence of the D to G band intensity ratio (ID∕IG) and of the relative contribution from the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) graphite regions to the G′ band in the Raman spectra. The D band integrated intensity was found to decrease linearly with increasing laser energy (EL), in contrast with recent experiments on nanographite, which showed an EL−4 dependence for the ID∕IG ratio. The calculation of the skewness of the G′ band was found to be a good qualitative measure of the relative density of 2D and 3D graphite in a given region of the sample. The direct comparison between the spatial distribution of defects, given by the ID∕IG ratio, and the presence of the 2D graphite phase, given by the skewness of the G′ band, suggests a correlation between the presence of defects and the high density of 2D graphite.
    Physical Review B 07/2007; 76(3). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.76.035444 · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    Ge. G. Samsonidze · E. B. Barros · R Saito · J Jiang · G Dresselhaus · M. S. Dresselhaus
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    ABSTRACT: The electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional graphite and metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The highest-frequency phonon mode at the K point in two-dimensional graphite opens a dynamical band gap that induces a Kohn anomaly. Similar effects take place in metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes that undergo Peierls transitions driven by the highest-frequency phonon modes at the and K points. The dynami-cal band gap induces a nonlinear dependence of the phonon frequencies on the doping level and gives rise to strong anharmonic effects in two-dimensional graphite and metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 04/2007; 75(15):155420. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.75.155420 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although the Raman effect was discovered nearly 80 years ago, it is only recently that the special characteristics of Raman scattering for one-dimensional systems have been seriously considered. This review focuses on the special interest of the Raman effect for one-dimensional systems that is of particular relevance to carbon nanostructures. Two examples of Raman scattering in one-dimensional systems are given. The first illustrates the use of Raman spectroscopy to reveal the remarkable structure and properties of carbon nanotubes arising from their one-dimensionality. Some of the recent advances in using Raman spectroscopy to study doping and intercalation to modify nanotube properties are reviewed, in the context of a one-dimensional system. The second example is the Raman spectra of a linear chain of carbon atoms and the special properties of this interesting system. New approaches toward applying Raman spectroscopy to carbon nanostructures are also emphasized.
    Physica E Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures 03/2007; 37(1):81-87. DOI:10.1016/j.physe.2006.07.048 · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have studied the exciton properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation within tight-binding models. The screening effect of the π electrons in carbon nanotubes is treated within the random phase and static screened approximations. The exciton wave functions along the tube axis and circumference are discussed as a function of (n,m). A 2n+m=const family behavior is found in the exciton wave function length, excitation energy, binding energy, and environmental shift. This family behavior is understood in terms of the trigonal warping effect around the K point of a graphene layer and curvature effects. The large family spread in the excitation energy of the Kataura plot is found to come from the single-particle energy.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 01/2007; 75(3). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.75.035407 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Within the framework of the tight-binding model, we have developed exciton-photon and exciton-phonon matrix elements for single-wall carbon nanotubes. The formulas for first-order resonance and double-resonance Raman processes are discussed in detail. The lowest-energy excitonic state possesses an especially large exciton-photon matrix element compared to other excitonic states and continuum band states because of its localized wave function with no node. Unlike the free-particle picture, the photon matrix element in the exciton picture shows an inverse diameter dependence but no tube type or chirality dependences. As a result, the optical absorption intensity shows a strong diameter dependence but no tube type or chirality dependences. Moreover, the continuum band edge can be determined from the wave function or exciton-photon matrix element. For the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G-band modes, the phonon matrix elements in the exciton and free-particle pictures are almost the same. As a result, the intensity for the Kataura plots for the RBM or G-band modes by the exciton and free-particle pictures show similar family patterns. However, the excitonic effect has greatly increased the diameter dependence and magnitude of the intensities for the RBM and G band by enhancing the diameter dependence and magnitude of the photon matrix element. Therefore, excitons have to be considered in order to explain the strong diameter dependence of the Raman signal observed experimentally.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 01/2007; 75(3). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.75.035405 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Physical Review B 01/2007; · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We discuss here how the trigonal warping effect of the electronic structure is relevant to optical processes in graphite and carbon nanotubes. The electron-photon, electron-phonon, and elastic scattering matrix elements have a common factor of the coefficients of Bloch wave funtions of the A and B atoms in the graphite unit cell. Because of the three fold symmetry around the Fermi energy point (the K or K′ point), the matrix elements show a trigonal anisotropy which can be observed in both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. This anisotropy is essential for understanding the chirality dependence of the Raman intensity and the optical response of single wall carbon nanotubes.
    Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals 10/2006; 455(1):287-294. DOI:10.1080/15421400600698758 · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a confocal micro-Raman system, spectra showing the splitting of optical transitions due to trigonal warping effect are presented for metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes SWNT's. Our results indicate that the intensity variations between different optical transitions can be attributed primarily to the differences in the magnitude of the electron-phonon coupling matrix elements. Our approach will allow the study of the magni-tude of electron-phonon matrix elements as well as quantum interference effects between different transitions in metallic SWNT's.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 08/2006; 74(7). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.74.073406 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Raman intensity of the disorder-induced D-band in graphitic materials is cal-culated as a function of the in-plane size of the graphite nanoparticles (L a) and as a function of the excitation laser energy. Matrix elements associated with the dou-ble resonance Raman processes, i.e., electron-photon, electron-phonon and electron-defect process are calculated based on the tight binding method. The electron-defect interaction is calculated by considering the elastic scattering at the armchair edge of graphite, adopting a nanographite flake whose width is L a . We compare the cal-culated results with the experimental results obtained from the spectra for different laser lines and L a .
    Chemical Physics Letters 08/2006; 427(1). DOI:10.1016/j.cplett.2006.05.107 · 1.99 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
194.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2011
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Physics
      Berkeley, CA, United States
  • 2010
    • Universidade Federal do Ceará
      • Departamento de Física
      Ceará, Ceará, Brazil
  • 2002–2009
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
      Cambridge, MA, United States