Guillermo Torres

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Are you Guillermo Torres?

Claim your profile

Publications (2)28.27 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of ChaMP, we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow up using the FLWO, SAAO, WIYN, CTIO, KPNO, Magellan, MMT and Gemini telescopes, and from archival SDSS spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% BLAGN, 16% NELG, 14% ALG, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z~5.5 and galaxies out to z~3. We have compiled extensive photometry from X-ray to radio bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed SEDs for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of templates to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGN and starburst components where both are present. While ~58% of X-ray Seyferts require a starburst event to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z>1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a strong connection between X-ray obscuration and star-formation but we do not find any association between X-ray column density and star formation rate both in the general population or the star-forming X-ray Seyferts. Our large compilation also allows us to report here the identification of 81 XBONG, 78 z>3 X-ray sources and 8 Type-2 QSO candidates. Also we have identified the highest redshift (z=5.4135) X-ray selected QSO with optical spectroscopy.
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 04/2012; 200(2). DOI:10.1088/0067-0049/200/2/17 · 14.14 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present follow-up optical g', r', and i' imaging and spectroscopy of serendipitous X-ray sources detected in six archival Chandra images included in the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP). Of the 486 X-ray sources detected between 3 × 10-16 and 2 × 10-13 (with a median flux of 3 × 10-15) ergs cm-2 s-1, we find optical counterparts for 377 (78%), or 335 (68%) counting only unique counterparts. We present spectroscopic classifications for 125 objects, representing 75% of sources with r* < 21 optical counterparts (63% to r* = 22). Of all classified objects, 63 (50%) are broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which tend to be blue in (g*-r*) colors. X-ray information efficiently segregates these quasars from stars, which otherwise strongly overlap in these SDSS colors until z > 3.5. We identify 28 sources (22%) as galaxies that show narrow emission lines, while 22 (18%) are absorption line galaxies. Eight galaxies lacking broad-line emission have X-ray luminosities that require they host an AGN (logLX > 43). Half of these have hard X-ray emission suggesting that high gas columns obscure both the X-ray continuum and the broad emission line regions. We find objects in our sample that show signs of X-ray or optical absorption, or both, but with no strong evidence that these properties are coupled. ChaMP's deep X-ray and optical imaging enable multiband selection of small and/or high-redshift groups and clusters. In these six fields we have discovered three new clusters of galaxies, two with z > 0.4, and one with photometric evidence for a similar redshift.
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 12/2008; 150(1):43. DOI:10.1086/379818 · 14.14 Impact Factor