P. Chandwadkar

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, State of Maharashtra, India

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Publications (4)12.9 Total impact

  • C Acharya, P Chandwadkar, S K Apte
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    ABSTRACT: The filamentous, heterocystous, diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa was found to bind uranium from aqueous solutions containing 100 μM uranyl carbonate at pH 7.8. The uranyl sequestration kinetics exhibited (a) an initial rapid phase, binding 48% uranium within 30 min resulting in a loading of 56 mg U g(-1) of dry wt, followed by (b) a slower phase, binding 65% uranium with resultant loading of 77.35 mg U g(-1) in 24h. Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium loaded biomass revealed all components of UL X-rays (UL(l), UL(α), UL(β1) and UL(β2)). Heat killed cells or extracellular polysaccharides derived from live cells exhibited limited uranyl binding (~26%) highlighting the importance of cell viability for optimum uranyl binding. The present study revealed the involvement of acid soluble polyphosphates in uranium accumulation by this brackish water cyanobacterium.
    Bioresource Technology 03/2012; 116:290-4. · 5.04 Impact Factor
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    Celin Acharya, P. Chandwadkar, S.K. Apte
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    ABSTRACT: The filamentous, heterocystous, diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa was found to bind ura- nium from aqueous solutions containing 100 lM uranyl carbonate at pH 7.8. The uranyl sequestration kinetics exhibited (a) an initial rapid phase, binding 48% uranium within 30 min resulting in a loading of 56 mg U g�1 of dry wt, followed by (b) a slower phase, binding 65% uranium with resultant loading of 77.35 mg U g�1 in 24 h. Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium loaded biomass revealed all components of UL X-rays (ULl, UL a, UL b1 and ULb2). Heat killed cells or extracellular polysac- charides derived from live cells exhibited limited uranyl binding (�26%) highlighting the importance of cell viability for optimum uranyl binding. The present study revealed the involvement of acid soluble polyphosphates in uranium accumulation by this brackish water cyanobacterium.
    Bioresource Technology 01/2012; 116. · 5.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uranium (VI) recovery from saline environment by a marine unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus
    Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry 01/2012; · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    C. Acharya, P. Chandwadkar, D. Joseph, S. K. Apte
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    ABSTRACT: Sequestration of uranium from simulated sea water and reverse osmosis concentrates by the marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus was assessed. Short term experiments established removal of 90–98 % uranium by the strain from simulated sea water containing 13 nM uranyl carbonate at pH 7.8, resulting in a loading of 7–42 μg U g−1 over a period of 1–5 days respectively. Long term experiments involving repeated exposure of Synechococcus biomass to fresh simulated sea water every third day, showed a loading of 2,960 μg U g−1 in 4 weeks. Nearly 85–90 % of cell bound uranium could be desorbed using 0.1 N HCl. The organism could sequester uranium (13,306 μg U g−1 in 24 h) from aqueous solutions supplemented with 0.6 M NaCl and 21 μM [UO2(CO3)2]2− at pH 7.8. The results demonstrate noteworthy potential of this organism for harnessing uranium from marine environments.
    Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry 295(2). · 1.41 Impact Factor