Are you T Aker?

Claim your profile

Publications (2)8.31 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The validity of a Traumatic Stress Symptom Checklist (TSSC), which was developed as part of a Screening Instrument for Traumatic Stress in Earthquake Survivors (SITSES), was examined in 130 survivors of the recent earthquake in Turkey. Data were obtained on the TSSC, which consists of 17 DSM-IV posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) items and 6 symptoms of depression. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and the Major Depressive Episode module of the Semistructured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were used for comparison with the TSSC. The results indicated that the TSSC has high internal consistency and satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in predicting the diagnosis of PTSD and major depression. The SITSES appeared to be a useful instrument in screening earthquake survivors for PTSD, major depression, illness severity, and risk factors associated with traumatic stress responses.
    Journal of Traumatic Stress 08/2001; 14(3):491-509. · 2.72 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although much research has focused on mechanisms of traumatization and factors related to post-trauma psychological functioning in survivors of trauma, there have been few studies of survivors of torture despite the widespread practice of torture in the world. The aim of this study was to examine the role of 'psychological preparedness' for trauma in post-traumatic stress responses in survivors of torture. Thirty-four torture survivors who had no history of political activity, commitment to a political cause or group, or expectations of arrest and torture were compared with 55 tortured political activists, using structured interviews and measures of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Compared with tortured political activists, tortured non-activists were subject to relatively less severe torture but showed higher levels of psychopathology. Less psychological preparedness related to greater perceived distress during torture and more severe psychological problems, explaining 4% of the variance in general psychopathology and 9% of the variance in post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The study findings lend support to the role of prior immunization to traumatic stress and to unpredictability and uncontrollability of stressors in the effects of traumatization. Further research aimed at identifying the behavioural and cognitive components of psychological preparedness that play a role in traumatization may provide useful insights into effective treatment strategies for survivors of torture.
    Psychological Medicine 12/1997; 27(6):1421-33. · 5.59 Impact Factor