Yolanda Gonzalez

Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Ciudad de México, The Federal District, Mexico

Are you Yolanda Gonzalez?

Claim your profile

Publications (6)23.15 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of the H1N1 influenza vaccine relies on the induction of both humoral and cellular responses. This study evaluated the humoral and cellular responses to a monovalent non-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine in occupationally exposed subjects who were previously vaccinated with a seasonal vaccine. Sixty healthy workers from a respiratory disease hospital were recruited. Sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained prior to and 1 month after vaccination with a non-adjuvanted monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine (Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine Panenza, Sanofi Pasteur). Antibody titers against the pandemic A/H1N1 influenza virus were measured via hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays. Antibodies against the seasonal HA1 were assessed by ELISA. The frequency of IFN-gamma-producing cells as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation specific to the pandemic virus A/H1N peptides, seasonal H1N1 peptides and seasonal H3N2 peptides were assessed using ELISPOT and flow cytometry. At baseline, 6.7% of the subjects had seroprotective antibody titers. The seroconversion rate was 48.3%, and the seroprotection rate was 66.7%. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) were significantly increased (from 6.8 to 64.9, p < 0.05). Forty-nine percent of the subjects had basal levels of specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells to the pandemic A/H1N1 peptides that were unchanged post-vaccination. CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to specific pandemic A/H1N1 virus peptides was also unchanged; in contrast, the antigen-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells significantly increased post-vaccination. Our results indicate that a cellular immune response that is cross-reactive to pandemic influenza antigens may be present in populations exposed to the circulating seasonal influenza virus prior to pandemic or seasonal vaccination. Additionally, we found that the pandemic vaccine induced a significant increase in CD8+ T cell proliferation.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 11/2013; 13(1):544. · 3.03 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μ M) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.
    Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity 01/2013; 2013:375893.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reside in the phagosomes of macrophages where antigenic processing is initiated. Mycobacterial antigen–MHC class II complexes are formed within the phagosome and are then trafficked to the cell surface. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) influence the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the role of these cytokines with regard to the formation of M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes remains unknown. We analysed the kinetics and subcellular localization of M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes in M. tuberculosis-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) using autologous M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cells. The MDMs were pre-treated with either IFN-γ or IL-10 and infected with M. tuberculosis. Cells were mechanically homogenized, separated on Percoll density gradients and manually fractionated. The fractions were incubated with autologous M. tuberculosis -specific CD4+ T cells. Our results demonstrated that in MDMs pre-treated with IFN-γ, M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes were detected early mainly in the phagosomal fractions, whereas in the absence of IFN-γ, the complexes were detected in the endosomal fractions. In MDMs pre-treated with IL-10, the M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes were retained in the endosomal fractions, and these complexes were not detected in the plasma membrane fractions. The results of immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated the presence of Ag85B associated with HLA-DR at the cell surface only in the IFN-γ-treated MDMs, suggesting that IFN-γ may accelerate M. tuberculosis antigen processing and presentation at the cell membrane, whereas IL-10 favours the trafficking of Ag85B to vesicles that do not contain LAMP-1. Therefore, IFN-γ and IL-10 play a role in the formation and trafficking of M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes.
    Immunology 01/2013; 138(1). · 3.71 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: CD33 is a membrane receptor containing a lectin domain and a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that is able to inhibit cytokine production. CD33 is expressed by monocytes, and reduced expression of CD33 correlates with augmented production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-8. However, the role of CD33 in the inflammation associated with hyperglycemia and diabetes is unknown. Therefore, we studied CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion in freshly isolated monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes. To evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia, monocytes from healthy donors were cultured with different glucose concentrations (15-50 mmol/l D-glucose), and CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine production were assessed. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling protein-3 (SOCS-3) and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also evaluated to address the cellular mechanisms involved in the down-regulation of CD33. CD33 expression was significantly decreased in monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes, and higher levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were detected in the plasma of patients compared to healthy donors. Under high glucose conditions, CD33 protein and mRNA expression was significantly decreased, whereas spontaneous TNF-α secretion and SOCS-3 mRNA expression were increased in monocytes from healthy donors. Furthermore, the down-regulation of CD33 and increase in TNF-α production were prevented when monocytes were treated with the antioxidant α-tocopherol and cultured under high glucose conditions. Our results suggest that hyperglycemia down-regulates CD33 expression and triggers the spontaneous secretion of TNF-α by peripheral monocytes. This phenomenon involves the generation of ROS and the up-regulation of SOCS-3. These observations support the importance of blood glucose control for maintaining innate immune function and suggest the participation of CD33 in the inflammatory profile associated with type 2 diabetes.
    BMC Immunology 04/2012; 13:19. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of severe pneumonia associated with the A/H1N1 virus are not well known. The objective of this study was to determine whether severe A/H1N1-associated pneumonia can be explained by the emergence of particular T-cell subsets and the cytokines/chemokines they produced, as well as distinct responses to infection. T-cell subset distribution and cytokine/chemokine levels in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were determined in patients with severe A/H1N1 infection, asymptomatic household contacts, and healthy controls. Cytokine and chemokine production was also evaluated after in vitro infection with seasonal H1N1 and pandemic A/H1N1 strains. We found an increase in the frequency of peripheral Th2 and Tc2 cells in A/H1N1 patients. A trend toward increased Tc1 cells was observed in household contacts. Elevated serum levels of IL-6, CXCL8, and CCL2 were found in patients and a similar cytokine/chemokine profile was observed in BAL, in which CCL5 was also increased. Infection assays revealed that both strains induce the production of several cytokines/chemokines at 24 and 72 h, however, IL-6, CCL3, and CXCL8 were strongly up-regulated in 72-h cultures in presence of the A/H1N1 virus. Several inflammatory mediators are up-regulated in peripheral and lung samples from A/H1N1-infected patients who developed severe pneumonia. In addition, the A/H1N1 strain induces higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines than the seasonal H1N1 strain. These findings suggest that it is possible to identify biomarkers of severe pneumonia and also suggest the therapeutic use of immunomodulatory drugs in patients with severe pneumonia associated with A/H1N1 infection.
    Autoimmunity 08/2011; 44(7):562-70. · 2.77 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fibrocytes are progenitor cells characterized by the simultaneous expression of mesenchymal, monocyte, and hematopoietic stem cell markers. We previously documented their presence in lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the mechanisms involved in their migration, subsequent homing, and local role remain unclear. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) facilitate cell migration and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. To evaluate the expression and role of matrix metalloproteinases in human fibrocytes. Fibrocytes were purified from CD14(+) monocytes and cultured for 8 days; purity of fibrocyte cultures was 95% or greater as determined by flow cytometry. Conditioned media and total RNA were collected and the expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-8, and MMP-9 was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protein synthesis was examined using a Multiplex assay, Western blot, fluorescent immunocytochemistry, and confocal microscopy. MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymatic activities were evaluated by gelatin zymography. Migration was assessed using collagen I-coated Boyden chambers. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α and platelet-derived growth factor-B were used as chemoattractant with or without a specific MMP-8 inhibitor. Fibrocytes showed gene and protein expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-8, and MMP-7. MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymatic activities were also demonstrated by gelatin zymography. Likewise, we found colocalization of MMP-8 and MMP-7 with type I collagen in fibrocytes. Fibrocyte migration toward platelet-derived growth factor-B or Stromal cell-derived factor-1α in collagen I-coated Boyden chambers was significantly reduced by a specific MMP-8 inhibitor. Our findings reveal that fibrocytes express a variety of MMPs and that MMP-8 actively participates in the process of fibrocyte migration.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 11/2010; 182(9):1144-52. · 11.04 Impact Factor