Are you Daniel Osowski?

Claim your profile

Publications (2)21.64 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the high-resolution (1.9 Å) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c(10) ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c(10) ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common "drug-binding site." We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2012; 109(35):13961-5. · 9.74 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The proton pore of the F(1)F(o) ATP synthase consists of a ring of c subunits, which rotates, driven by downhill proton diffusion across the membrane. An essential carboxylate side chain in each subunit provides a proton-binding site. In all the structures of c-rings reported to date, these sites are in a closed, ion-locked state. Structures are here presented of the c(10) ring from Saccharomyces cerevisiae determined at pH 8.3, 6.1 and 5.5, at resolutions of 2.0 Å, 2.5 Å and 2.0 Å, respectively. The overall structure of this mitochondrial c-ring is similar to known homologs, except that the essential carboxylate, Glu59, adopts an open extended conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that opening of the essential carboxylate is a consequence of the amphiphilic nature of the crystallization buffer. We propose that this new structure represents the functionally open form of the c subunit, which facilitates proton loading and release.
    Nature Structural & Molecular Biology 04/2012; 19(5):485-91, S1. · 11.90 Impact Factor