S. Schone

Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen, Hesse, Germany

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Publications (3)6.6 Total impact

  • M. Muck, S. Schone, C. Heiden
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated a possible scheme to reduce 1/f noise generated by thermally activated hopping of vortices in SQUIDs by trying to remove vortices from the SQUID body, or at least move them to pinning sites having a high pinning energy. This is accomplished by a “demagnetisation” scheme using a high frequency magnetic field. Niobium SQUIDs were carefully cooled in a magnetically well shielded environment and then exposed to switching transients. The thereby generated low frequency excess noise or an increased white noise could substantially be reduced by this demagnetisation process. The temperature dependence of the flux signal of the flux locked SQUID and the magnetic field dependence of this drift could also be reduced in cases where the drift was caused by motion of trapped vortices. The influence of frequency and amplitude of the demagnetisation field on the amount of noise reduction was studied in some detail
    IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 07/1997; · 1.20 Impact Factor
  • S. Schone, M. Muck, C. Heiden
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated a possible reduction of low‐frequency excess noise and the dependence of the flux signal on temperature changes in direct current superconducting quantum interference devices, dc SQUIDs, generated by trapped flux. Niobium thin film dc SQUIDs, carefully cooled down in a well shielded environment, have been exposed to switching transients. The thereby generated low‐frequency excess noise and in some case an excess white noise, could substantially be reduced by applying a rf magnetic field of sufficiently high frequency to the SQUID. The temperature dependence of the flux signal of the SQUID and the magnetic field dependence of the drift could also be reduced in these cases, where the drift is caused by movement of trapped vortices. © 1996 American Institute of Physics.
    Applied Physics Letters 03/1996; · 3.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A number of applications of high‐temperature superconductor radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf SQUIDs) require a certain immunity of these sensors against electromagnetic interference (EMI). We have investigated effects of electromagnetic radiation in the high‐frequency and ultrahigh‐frequency range on various types of rf SQUIDs. It has been found that EMI of sufficient field strength reduces the voltage versus flux transfer function, and thus increases the flux noise of the SQUIDs. SQUIDs with a wire wound tank circuit coil have been found to be more sensitive to EMI than SQUIDs integrated into a superconducting microstrip resonator. © 1995 American Institute of Physics.
    Review of Scientific Instruments 10/1995; · 1.60 Impact Factor