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Publications (5)2.05 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Traditional capacitive tactile sensor sheets usually have a three-layered structure, with a dielectric layer sandwiched by two electrode layers. Each electrode layer has a number of parallel ribbon-like electrodes. The electrodes on the two electrode layers are oriented orthogonally and each crossing point of the two perpendicular electrode arrays makes up a capacitive sensor cell on the sheet. It is well known that compatibility between measuring precision and resolution is difficult, since decreasing the width of the electrodes is required to obtain a high resolution, however, this may lead to reduction of the area of the sensor cells, and as a result, lead to a low Signal/Noise (S/N) ratio. To overcome this problem, a new multilayered structure and related calculation procedure are proposed. This new structure stacks two or more sensor sheets with shifts in position. Both a high precision and a high resolution can be obtained by combining the signals of the stacked sensor sheets. Trial production was made and the effect was confirmed.
    Sensors 01/2014; 14(2):2225-2238. · 2.05 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Robotics andMechatronics. 01/2012; 24(3):472-479.
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    ABSTRACT: In aging societies, there is a strong demand for robotics to tackle problems resulting from the aging population. Patient transfer, such as lifting and moving a bedridden patient from a bed to a wheelchair and back, is one of the most physically challenging tasks in nursing care. We have developed a prototype nursing-care assistant robot, RIBA, that can conduct patient transfer using human-type arms. The basic robot motion trajectories are created by interpolating several postures designated in advance. To accomplish more flexible and suitable motion, adjustment using sensor information is necessary, because the patient's posture and positions in contact with the robot may differ slightly in each trial. In this paper, we propose a motion adjustment method in patient lifting using tactile sensors mounted on the robot arms. The results of experiments using a lifesize dummy are also presented.
    Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2011 IEEE International Conference on; 06/2011
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    ABSTRACT: In aging societies, there is a strong demand for robotics to tackle problems resulting from the aging population. We have developed a prototype nursing-care assistant robot, RIBA, which was designed to come in direct contact with patients and conduct physically challenging tasks. RIBA interacts with its object, typically a human, through multiple and distributed contact regions on its arms and body. To obtain information on such whole-body contact, RIBA has tactile sensors on a wide area of its arms. The regions where hard contact with the manipulated person may occur have almost flat surfaces, leading to surface contact involving a finite area, in order to reduce contact pressure and not to cause the person's pain. When controlling the position and orientation of the person, the relative positions and orientations of the distributed contacting surfaces should be preserved as far as possible to maintain stable contact and not to graze the person's skin. Preserving the force and the pressure pattern of each contact region using tactile feedback is also important to provide stable and comfortable human-robot physical interaction. In this paper, we propose a whole-body contact manipulation method using tactile information to meet these requirements.
    2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2011, San Francisco, CA, USA, September 25-30, 2011; 01/2011
  • Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan. 01/2010; 28(7):905-912.