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Publications (4)0 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A network intrusion detection (ID) system detects malicious behavior by analyzing network traffic. Malicious behavior may target the disruption of communications, infrastructure services, and applications. A number of ID techniques proposed for dynamic wireless networks (e.g., sensor, ad-hoc and mobile ad-hoc networks) are based on the creation of an overlay hierarchy or other structure to organize the collection and processing of ID data. The particular structure chosen may significantly impact the ID system's performance with respect to network overhead, responsiveness, scalability, detection latency, resiliency to failures, and other factors. In this paper, we propose the formal definition and quantification of resiliency and detection latency. Specifically, we introduce analytical expressions that map ID structures to the metric space of real numbers. We define this mapping for a) various types of tree structures that have been proposed previously for dynamic wireless systems and b) a hypercube structure that presents promising resiliency characteristics. This analysis reveals important tradeoffs among the various ID structures under consideration.
    Military Communications Conference, 2009. MILCOM 2009. IEEE; 11/2009
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    ABSTRACT: To support research in wireless mobile networks and mobile ad-hoc network security, the U.S. army research laboratory (ARL) has developed a ldquoWireless emulation laboratoryrdquo (WEL). A key component of the WEL is a Mobile Ad-hoc network (MANET) emulation testbed on which algorithms and applications can be subjected to emulated wireless network conditions. The testbed is based on the MANE (mobile ad-hoc network emulator) software originally developed by the naval research laboratory (NRL). It has since been improved through the incorporation of advanced modeling methods and computing technologies. Important additional features include (1) the integration of the terrain integrated rough earth model (TIREM) propagation model, (2) the use of virtual machine technologies to scale the size of the network, and (3) the inclusion of custom-designed mobility patterns to create a specific dynamic topology of a MANET under test. Currently the WEL testbed can emulate a 101-node MANET and, through the use of virtualization technologies, will scale well beyond that number. This paper discusses the current capabilities of ARLpsilas WEL for conducting empirical evaluation and demonstration of MANET technologies and concludes with planned future enhancements.
    Military Communications Conference, 2008. MILCOM 2008. IEEE; 12/2008
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    B.B. Luu, R.L. Hardy, G.T. Tran
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    ABSTRACT: The Mobile Ad hoc Network Emulator (MANE) test bed relies on accurate determination of radio signal propagation to emulate realistic mobile ad hoc network (MANET) connectivity. The determination of radio wave propagation is a very complex process that depends on numerous factors such as the transmitting medium (e.g., vacuum, air, or water), antenna properties of transmitters and receivers, and the geometrical environment (i.e. terrain). The Terrain-Integrated Rough-Earth Model (TIREM) software is an Army standard for computing the path loss of radio wave propagation, but it cannot currently be used directly by the MANE system software to determine network connectivity. This paper describes the implementation of an efficient preprocessing technique for using and integrating TIREM into the MANE software system to improve the precision of the calculated radio propagation path loss. The implemented technique has expedited the determination of connectivity and the decision to forward network packets in the MANE test bed.
    Military Communications Conference, 2008. MILCOM 2008. IEEE; 12/2008
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    ABSTRACT: The objective force is the ultimate goal of the U.S. Army to transform itself into a highly mobile ground force that will be the most rapidly deployable and tactically agile force capable of engaging "full-spectrum" operations. Advanced information and wireless communications capabilities are among key-enabling technologies that support a dominant feature of the objective force: rapid deployment. This paper describes and explain the technologies utilized in an experimental mobile test bed environment that has been deployed as a communications contingency during Y2K support to the Pentagon, although the main purpose of the test bed was to establish a platform for conducting research, development, and evaluation of emerging communications, networking, sensors, and information technologies that can improve strategic and tactical responsiveness of the U.S. ground force.
    Military Communications Conference, 2003. MILCOM 2003. IEEE; 11/2003