Lee Morton

Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom

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Publications (6)1.97 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Location-based games offer opportunities for us to learn more about people’s interactions and feelings towards the environment they are in as well as to understand more about the mental models and locations associated with known environments, e.g. a university campus with its associations of learning. In our study, we wanted to manipulate the activities in a game to take advantage of certain locations in the hope of producing certain emotional reactions. However, it is not enough to simply produce these reactions; one must also have a way of capturing any emotions produced whether these are the ones expected or not. The objective of this paper, therefore, was to trial a new methodology for location-based games that aims at capturing the players’ emotional reactions to the activities in a game whilst in certain locations. In order to test the methodology, we designed a location-based game that can be played on any Bluetooth-enabled mobile phone that has an accelerometer. The game has been designed to interweave with a persons’ normal activity. As a result, there is little distinction between gaming time and non-gaming time.
    Personal and Ubiquitous Computing 01/2011; 15:13-24. · 1.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a novel method of interaction for users to preview an audio track haptically. The preview enables users to "feel" the track they want to select, thus saving them from having to look at the screen or listen to the track before actually playing it. Our results show that users enjoyed the combination of audio and haptic feedback and that users would very much like to see this type of sensory collaboration being incorporated into their own mobile device.
    Proceedings of the 13th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, Mobile HCI 2011, Stockholm, Sweden, August 30 - September 2, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: The paper describes the creation of a mobile music player accompanied with synchronised haptic feedback to create a novel method of audio playback on a mobile device. There has been extensive research into the development of audio haptic systems to enhance user interaction on mobile devices as well as providing useful information about users' surroundings while way-finding. We investigated an alternative collaboration of haptics and audio feedback which we present here. We believe that this collaboration provides a novel and fun method of interaction with a music playback application. Our results show that users enjoyed the combination of audio and haptic feedback and that users would very much like to see this type of sensory collaboration being incorporated into their own mobile device.
    01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Currently, patients are discharged to their homes after successful total knee replacement (TKR) surgery with a standard exercise booklet that contains instructions on how to carry out home exercises. This paper investigates the feasibility of building a low cost inertial motion capture system to provide patients with real time visualization of biomechanical data while performing home based rehabilitation exercises. Commercially available motion capture systems suitable for clinical diagnosis or rehabilitation, such as Vicon are expensive, require professionals to setup and have complex calibration procedures. The accuracy of our proposed motion capture system is assessed using a Vicon optical motion tracking system The measurements are compared using a simple total angular displacement analysis.
    5th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, PervasiveHealth 2011, Dublin, Ireland, May 23-26, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Location-based games offer opportunities for us to learn more about what different types of interactions are appropriate in certain settings. In our study we designed several different types of activity (i.e. from standard key presses, to very physical lunges, to speech cues) that required the players to use different modalities in certain locations. Since the players could play the game whenever they wanted over the course of several days and the game space covered a wide area, i.e. the whole of the university campus, we needed a way to capture any of the activities, emotions and interactions whether these were the ones expected or not. The objective of this paper therefore was to investigate whether we could design certain multimodal interactions which would produce certain reactions and capture this using a carefully selected set of capture methods from logs to self report. In order to test the different interactions we designed a location based game that can be played on any Bluetooth enabled mobile phone that has an accelerometer. The game has been designed to interweave with a persons’ normal activity: as a result there is little distinction between gaming time and non-gaming time. KeywordsMultimodality-Games-Location based interaction
    Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces 01/2010; 3(3):179-188. · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the importance of physical activity to health, many people do not meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. In order to gain a greater understanding of people's activity levels and patterns in everyday life we designed a mobile activity monitoring application, which resides on mobile phones which utilizes the accelerometer and GPS (either as an externally attached component or as in internal component) data. We designed the system to be used by any member of the public and then redesigned the system given continuous feedback from three sets of local authority workers who were just about to commence a walking led scheme. We logged their activity over a week long period.
    Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, Mobile HCI 2009, Bonn, Germany, September 15-18, 2009; 01/2009