M. J. Jackson

Purdue University, ウェストラファイエット, Indiana, United States

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Publications (82)66.09 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) in water was examined using TiO 2 nanopowders under solar irradiation. These photocatalysts were successfully synthesized by hydrolysis of titanium tetra chlo-ride (TiCl 4) in the temperature range of 70-95 °C and calcined at higher temperatures of between 400 and 900 °C. The samples prepared were characterized using x-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). UV-Vis spectrometer was used for analyzing the concentration of MO in solution at different time intervals during the photodeg-radation experiment. Parameters affecting the photodegradation rate such as catalyst crystallinity, con-centration of the catalyst, MO concentration, and pH of the solution have been investigated. The results indicate that TiO 2 nanopowder was antase at low calcination temperatures in the range of 400-500 °C. The sample calcined at 600 °C is composed of both anatase and rutile phase. Further increase in the temper-ature enhanced the intensities of diffraction peaks of the rutile phase. The size of the crystallites for all the samples prepared were found to be in the 6-13 nm range and from SEM micrographs it was in the range of 19-43 nm. The mixture of both phases exhibited a higher photoactivity in comparison with pure anatase or rutile catalysts.
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    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance 01/2013; 22:371-375. · 0.98 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance 01/2013; 22:371-375. · 0.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is considerable interest in TiO2 for a wide range of applications; however, this chapter focuses mainly on its uses as a biomaterial, particularly for biomedical implant devices. The main characteristics required for this application have been considered. Methods for producing TiO2 and Ag doped TiO2 films are summarized. The interactions of the films containing body fluids, mainly with blood components such as proteins, are discussed. Various techniques, including surface analysis methods, have been employed to characterize the undoped and Ag doped TiO2 films. Their behaviour under normal conditions inside the body, such as physiological pH, has been investigated and results presented.
    The design and manufacture of medical devices, First 01/2012: chapter One: pages 1-57; Wood Head Cambridge, UK., ISBN: ISBN 978-1-90756-872-5
  • The design and manufacture of medical devices, Edited by J. Paulo Davim, 01/2012: chapter Precision Machining of Medical Devices: pages 59-113; Wood Head, Cambridge, UK., ISBN: ISBN 978-1-90756-872-5
  • C. Maranhão, J. P. Davim, M. J. Jackson
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, the main objective is to predict the physical thermomechanical behavior when high-speed machining an aluminium alloy (7075-O) using a polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tool with a variable depth of cut (DOC). An advance commercial machining finite element software was used to aid the study and to help to predict physical parameters of cutting process such as cutting forces, temperature, maximum shear stress, and plastic strain.From the simulations made, it can be concluded that the DOC mainly influences the cutting and feed forces. On the contrary, an increase of DOC does not significantly influence cutting temperature, shear stress, or plastic strain.
    Materials and Manufacturing Processes 08/2011; 26(8):1034-1040. DOI:10.1080/10426914.2010.520794 · 1.49 Impact Factor
  • M. J. Jackson, G. M. Robinson
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the analysis of the micromilling process by comparing various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, and also explains why there is a discrepancy when calculating these temperatures generated during the micromachining process. The paper shows that the temperature of the shear plane never exceeds 35 °C when micromilling at spindle speeds in excess of 300,000 revolutions per minute. The paper also explains how machining high manganese content stainless steel presents significant challenges to tool wear especially at high cutting speeds. The paper compares the effectiveness of using TiCN and TiAlN coated micro tools compared to using uncoated WC-Co micro milling cutters.
    Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience 10/2010; 7(10):2210-2224. DOI:10.1166/jctn.2010.1605 · 1.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current paper presents a Finite Element Model (FEM) simulation and experimental analysis of orthogonal cutting on aluminium alloy using Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) tools. FEM machining simulations used a Lagrangian finite element‐based machining model, AdvantedgeTM, applied to predict cutting forces, temperature distribution, plastic strain, von Mises and maximum shear stresses. The orthogonal cutting model was validated by comparing cutting forces obtained experimentally with a thermo‐mechanical FEM analysis under orthogonal cutting conditions. Finally, FEM analysis prediction of the evolution of plastic strain, von Mises stress and maximum shear stresses during the machining of a commonly used aluminium alloy using PCD tools was conducted.
    International Journal of Materials and Product Technology 01/2010; 37. DOI:10.1504/IJMPT.2010.029458 · 0.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, a prediction of the thermo mechanical behaviour of the machining of an aluminium alloy is made, using a Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) cutting tool with a variable rake angle. To aid the study, a commercial machining finite element software was used and several parameters In conclusion, from the simulations made, it was possible to predict a positive influence of the inclusion of rake angle in PCD cutting tools. A reduction of cutting forces and temperature was shown with the increase of the rake angle, allowing this way an additional extension of the tool life.
    International Journal of Materials and Product Technology 01/2010; 37. DOI:10.1504/IJMPT.2010.029469 · 0.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The initial stages of intimate contact between an inclined wedge and low carbon steel creates significant opportunities for manufacturers of machined products to understand how dry machining and minimum quantity lubrication affect the economics of manufacturing, especially when one considers how important frictional interactions between chip and tool are on the final structure of the workpiece materials in terms of structural phase transformations. The present work not only compares various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, but also explains why there is a large discrepancy when calculating temperature generated during machining when using Loewen and Shaw's method for calculating shear plane and tool face temperatures.
    International Journal of Materials and Product Technology 11/2009; DOI:10.1504/IJMPT.2010.029456 · 0.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NiAl and Ni-Al-N thin films with a thickness of approximately 1 μm have been deposited onto glass and stainless steel 316 substrates using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion platting process. A CSM scratch tester was used to determine the critical load, the coefficient of friction and wear rate of the films. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of β-NiAl phase. EDAX revealed nearly equal atomic composition of Ni and Al at 300 W for Ni and 400 W for Al targets, respectively with the Ni-Al-N thin films showing a nickel rich NiAl phase. AFM indicated a smooth surface finish with surface roughness ≤ 100 nm. Nanoindentation for coatings on glass substrates displayed hardness and elastic modulus of 7.7 GPa and 100 GPa respectively. Hardest coatings obtained were at 10% of N content. Scratch test of coated samples gave critical load, friction of coefficient and wear rate of 24 N, 0.24 and 1×10<sup align="right">−6</sup> mm<sup align="right">3</sup>/m respectively on steel.
    International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials 01/2009; 2. DOI:10.1504/IJNBM.2009.027714
  • M. J. Jackson
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a historical review of the wear and the structure of vitrified grinding wheels. This review describes the tribological issues surrounding use of vitrified grinding wheels and is discussed in three ways. The first explains the relationship between grinding wheel wear and wheel performance and discusses the interactions between abrasive grain and workpiece material and how it relates to grinding wheel performance; the second investigates the issues surrounding the composition of the vitrified bonding system and how it affects wheel wear, whilst the third explores the effect of reactions in vitrified bonds during thermal treatment of the grinding wheel that affect the performance of vitrified grinding wheels during subsequent processing of common engineering materials. The paper provides a timely review of the microstructural aspects of vitrified grinding wheels.
    International Journal of Nanomanufacturing 01/2009; 3(4). DOI:10.1504/IJNM.2009.027502
  • M. J. Jackson, G. M. Robinson, W. Ahmed
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    ABSTRACT: The analysis of the micro milling process is described in this paper. The present work not only compares various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, but also explains why there is a discrepancy when calculating temperatures generated during the micromachining process. The paper shows that the temperature of the shear plane never exceeds 35°C when micro milling at spindle speeds in excess of 250,000 revolutions per minute. The paper also explains how machining AISI 1015 steel presents significant challenges to tool wear especially at high cutting speeds.
    International Journal of Nanomanufacturing 01/2009; 3. DOI:10.1504/IJNM.2009.027054
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    ABSTRACT: The interaction between a newly formed metal chip and the rake face of a cutting tool reveal the complicated nature of initial chip formation and plastic shear strains during the first few seconds of intimate contact. The loading placed on the metal chip during the first encounter with the cutting tool manifest themselves as an unpredictable curl that forces the chip to move away from the surface of the rake face and produce uneven plastic shear strains throughout the chip. The variation of the load causes instabilities on the shear plane that is directly observed using a high speed camera. As the variation of load progresses, the chip tends to curl away from the tool with varying radii until the apparently curved shear plane becomes linear. The results of initial chip formation demonstrate a very complex interaction between metal chip and rake face of the tool and the resulting development of the shear plane and its effect on plastic shear strains within the metal chip.
    Materials Science and Technology 11/2008; 24(12):1452-1461. DOI:10.1179/174328407X243014 · 0.80 Impact Factor
  • M. J. Jackson, M. D. Whitfield
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    ABSTRACT: The mutual interactions between M42 tool steel and a multipoint cutting tool creates significant opportunities to understand how dry milling of laser hardened materials affects machining conditions especially at the microscale. The present work not only compares various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures during dry machining, but also discusses how the accompanying machining attributes react to large changes in the coefficient of friction caused by changes in the type of coated cutting tool used for machining in the form of changes in the coefficient of sliding friction. The paper accounts for the changes in material properties during machining as a function of increasing temperature and also shows how stresses and strains are affected by significant changes in the magnitude of the coefficient of friction.
    Materials Science and Technology 04/2008; 24(4):413-426. DOI:10.1179/174328408X294071 · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to study the thermal and mechanical behaviour in machining of aluminium alloys (Al 7075-0) using PCD (polycrystalline diamond) and K10 (cemented carbide) tools and to make a comparison between the performances of both tools. The study was made using a commercial finite element software. This software has a user friendly interface and can output several results including cutting forces, temperature, pressure, von Mises stress, maximum shear stress, plastic strain, and plastic strain rate which were the objectives of this study. By analysing the simulations, it was concluded that the polycrystalline tool has a superior performance in terms of cutting and feed forces and temperature when compared to the cemented carbide tool.
    International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 01/2008; 39(11):1093-1100. DOI:10.1007/s00170-007-1299-y · 1.78 Impact Factor
  • M. J. Jackson, G. M. Robinson, J. S. Morrell
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    ABSTRACT: The analysis of the high‐speed mechanical micro milling process is described in this paper. The present work not only compares various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, but also explains why there is a difference when calculating temperatures generated during the micromachining process. The analysis shows that the computed temperature of the shear plane never exceeds 35°C when micro milling at spindle speeds in excess of 250,000 revolutions per minute. Machining AISI 1020 steel at significantly high speeds presents significant challenges to prevent the accelerated wear of the cutting tool that is caused by the frictional interactions between chip and tool and the nature of the intermittent contact. The analysis also shows the effect of coating at reducing the interface temperatures between chip and tool and concludes that each coating has very little effect at reducing temperature at the tool face and at the primary shear zone.
    International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials 01/2008; 1(4). DOI:10.1504/IJNBM.2008.022871
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    ABSTRACT: The machining of M42 tool steel is discussed in this paper. Traditionally, these materials have been machined using uncoated cutting tools with limited success. New developments in titanium-based coatings such as cation-substituted Ti<sub align="right"> l-x-y-z </sub>Al<sub align="right"> x </sub>Cry<sub align="right"> y </sub>Y<sub align="right"> 2 </sub>N alloys, with y = 0.03 and z = 0.02, have been shown to offer enhanced high-temperature oxidation resistance compared to presently used TiN and Ti<sub align="right"> l-x </sub>Al<sub align="right"> x </sub>N films that are deposited to cutting tool surfaces. Machining experiments indicated that cutting tool life is improved significantly using yttrium-doped titanium based coatings, when machining M42 tool steels.
  • M. J. Jackson, J. S. Morrell, W. Ahmed
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    ABSTRACT: Chip formation is of fundamental importance during the formation of nanostructured pure metals. Poor chip control leads to chip build-up and an uncontrollable surface roughness. The use of chip breaking is arbitrary because of the mechanics of chip curl is not well understood. The causes of chip curl and chip flow are still the subject of intense discussion and research among plasticity researchers. The subject originally focused on cutting forces and on the conditions at the chip-tool interface using soft plastic metals. The increasing speed of cutting has focused researchers to look at chip breaking after the chip has been cut. In the first instance, chips were considered to be continuous, discontinuous and continuous with a built-up edge. The theories of metal cutting allow one to predict the forces and stresses in the chip during formation but do not tell us anything about the strain within the chip, unless a computational approach is used. This paper describes the mechanics of chip formation using the grinding process at the microscale and explains how the deformation of the grinding grains affects shear strain rates and the average grain size in the cut chip.
    International Journal of Nanoparticles 01/2008; 1(4). DOI:10.1504/IJNP.2008.026470
  • M.J. Jackson, G.M. Robinson, J.S. Morrell
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    ABSTRACT: Improvements associated with the life of cutting tools used to machine M42 tool steel are discussed in this paper. To achieve this, experiments using a variety of tool coatings are conducted on quenched and tempered M42. The limitations of the study include the employment of a short-time tool wear method. The paper presents original information on the characteristics of dry machining M42 tool steels under finish machining conditions.
    International Journal of Nanomanufacturing 01/2008; 2(1/2):174 - 180. DOI:10.1504/IJNM.2008.017848

Publication Stats

389 Citations
66.09 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2011
    • Purdue University
      • • College of Technology
      • • Birck Nanotechnology Center
      ウェストラファイエット, Indiana, United States
  • 2002–2005
    • Tennessee Technological University
      • • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      • • Center for Manufacturing Research
      Cookeville, Tennessee, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Cambridge
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2000–2003
    • University of Liverpool
      • School of Engineering
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom
  • 1993–1995
    • Liverpool John Moores University
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom