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Publications (4)4.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Purpose A life-cycle assessment (LCA) was performed to evaluate the environmental impacts of the remediation of industrial soils contaminated by polychlorobiphenyl (PCB). Two new bioremediation treatment options were compared with the usual incineration process. In this attributional LCA, only secondary impacts were considered. The contaminated soil used for the experiments contained 200 mg of PCB per kilogram. Methods Three off-site treatment scenarios were studied: 1) bioremediation with mechanical aeration, 2) bioremediation with electric aeration and 3) incineration with natural gas. Bioremediation processes were designed from lab-scale, scale-up and pilot experiments. The incineration technique was inspired by a French plant. A semi-quantitative uncertainty analysis was performed on the data. Environmental impacts were evaluated with the CML 2001 method using the SimaPro software. Results and discussion In most compared categories, the bioremediation processes are favorable. Of the bioremediation options, the lowest environmental footprint was observed for electric aeration. The uncertainty analysis supported the results that compared incineration and bioremediation but decreased the difference between the options of aeration. The distance of transportation was one of the most sensitive parameters, especially for bioremediation. At equal distances between the polluted sites and the treatment plant, bioremediation had fewer impacts than incineration in eight out of 13 categories. Conclusions The use of natural gas for the incineration process generated the most impacts. Irrespective of the aeration option, bioremediation was better than incineration. The time of treatment should be taken into account. More precise and detailed data are required for the incineration scenario. More parameters of biological treatments should be measured. LCA results should be completed using ecological and health risk assessment and an acceptability evaluation.
    The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment 01/2012; 17(3). · 3.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thanks to growing environmental concerns in public opinion, bioremediation processes are more and more used to decontaminate soils from organic compounds. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to be world wide spread persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium is able to degrade PCBs in water, and soil As POPs, PCBs can also be adsorbed onto organic matter, such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium mycelium. This study aims at estimating the fractioning of truly degraded PCBs, adsorbed PCBs and residual PCBs in an aqueous bioremediation assay with Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Di-, tri- tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-chlorinated biphenyls (IUPAC numbers: PCB28, PCB52, PCB101, PCB118, PCB138, PCB153, PCB180) are extracted from 500 mL aqueous bioremediation assays using a liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane. Analyses are performed on a high resolution gas chromatography coupled with a low resolution mass spectrometry. The study reveals that the adsorbed PCBs fraction ranges from 42% to 54%, whereas the degraded one ranges from 39% to 49%. No PCBs were detected in the residual water (limit of detection: 13 ng.L-1).
    01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium is able to degrade PCBs in water and in soil. This study aims at estimating the fractioning of truly degraded PCBs, adsorbed PCBs and residual PCBs in an aqueous bioremediation assay with Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Di-, tri- tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-chlorinated biphenyls (IUPAC numbers: PCB28, PCB52, PCB101, PCB118, PCB138, PCB153, PCB180) were extracted from 500 mL aqueous bioremediation assays using a liquid–liquid extraction with n-hexane. Analyses were performed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The study reveals that the adsorbed PCBs fraction ranges from 42% to 54%, whereas the degraded one ranges from 39% to 49%. No PCBs were detected in the residual water (limit of detection: 13 ng L).
    International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry 01/2009; 89:849-856. · 1.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nitration reactions of aromatic compounds are commonly involved in military industrial processes. Military industries treated their process effluents using lagoon systems for many years. In this study, the sediment of a lagoon was investigated from a bioremediation objective. The physico-chemical characterization of the sediments showed the organic nature of the sediment (25.4% carbon with a C:N=3) highly concentrated in RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) as well as two herbicides Dinoterb (2-tert-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) and Dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene clone library revealed the presence of three dominant families, Geobacteriacea, Clostridiaceae and Pseudomonaceae. A bioremediation assay was carried out in anaerobic conditions in order to degrade organic compounds. In these conditions, 100% of Dinoterb and Dinoseb were degraded after 75 days of culture, while RDX and HMX were not consumed. The 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis of this incubation showed a drastic reduction of the final biodiversity composed by clones related to Enterobacteriaceae (especially Leclercia adecarboxylata) and Pseudomonaceae family. It was then suggested that Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonaceae were potentially involved in biodegradation of these two herbicides. To confirm this hypothesis, cultures were carried out with isolated species of Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas citronellolis and L. adecarboxylata in the presence of Dinoterb. The data confirmed that in the presence of glucose, these microorganisms are able to consume Dinoterb.
    International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation. 01/2008;