Gloria Dávila-Ortiz

National Polytechnic Institute, Villa Gustavo A. Madero, The Federal District, Mexico

Are you Gloria Dávila-Ortiz?

Claim your profile

Publications (29)44.86 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Jatropha curcas seed cake is a protein-rich byproduct of oil extraction which could be used to produce protein isolates. The purpose of this study was the optimization of the protein isolation process from the seed cake of an edible provenance of J. curcas by an alkaline extraction followed by isoelectric precipitation method via a sequentially integrated optimization approach. The influence of four different factors (solubilization pH, extraction temperature, NaCl addition, and precipitation pH) on the protein and antinutritional compounds content of the isolate was evaluated. The estimated optimal conditions were an extraction temperature of 20°C, a precipitation pH of 4, and an amount of NaCl in the extraction solution of 0.6 M for a predicted protein content of 93.3%. Under these conditions, it was possible to obtain experimentally a protein isolate with 93.21% of proteins, 316.5 mg 100 g−1 of total phenolics, 2891.84 mg 100 g−1 of phytates and 168 mg 100 g−1 of saponins. The protein content of the this isolate was higher than the content reported by other authors.
    ISRN Biotechnology. 02/2013; 2013.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bean protein isolate and phaseolin were hydrolysed using pepsin and pancreatin, and the resulting hydrolysates were filtered through a 1kDa cut-off membrane and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. Three fractions corresponding to MW 0.7-1.0kDa, 0.43-0.7kDa and <0.43kDa (A1, A2, and A3 for protein isolate fractions, and B1, B2, and B3 for phaseolin fractions) were assayed for antioxidant and metal chelating activity and they were also subjected to amino acid and SDS-PAGE analysis. Fractions A1 and B1 had the highest copper chelating activity (78% and 82%, respectively), while iron chelating activity was the highest in fractions A1 and B3 (36% and 16%, respectively). Fractions A2 and B3 had the highest antioxidant activity as determined by inhibition of reducing power and β-carotene bleaching, while the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity was found in A3 and B3. Thus, fractions coming from the isolate and phaseolin had similar activities except for iron chelation, suggesting that phaseolin is the major contributor to the antioxidant and copper chelating activities of the hydrolysed protein isolate.
    Food Chemistry 12/2012; 135(3):1789-95. · 3.33 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Journal of Food Quality 09/2012; · 0.76 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bean seeds are an inexpensive source of protein. Anthracnose disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum results in serious losses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crops worldwide, affecting any above-ground plant part, and protein dysfunction, inducing the synthesis of proteins that allow plants to improve their stress tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of beans damaged by anthracnose disease as a source of peptides with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-inhibitory activity. RESULTS: Protein concentrates from beans spoiled by anthracnose disease and from regular beans as controls were prepared by alkaline extraction and precipitation at isolelectric pH and hydrolysed using Alcalase 2.4 L. The hydrolysates from spoiled beans had ACE-I-inhibitory activity (IC(50) 0.0191 mg protein mL(-1) ) and were very similar to those from control beans in terms of ACE-I inhibition, peptide electrophoretic profile and kinetics of hydrolysis. Thus preparation of hydrolysates using beans affected by anthracnose disease would allow for revalorisation of this otherwise wasted product. CONCLUSION: The present results suggest the use of spoiled bean seeds, e.g. anthracnose-damaged beans, as an alternative for the isolation of ACE-I-inhibitory peptides to be further introduced as active ingredients in functional foods. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 08/2012; · 1.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A search in a database of potential bioactive short sequences in food proteins reveals that bioactive peptides with a variety of beneficial effects for cardiovascular health are present in the sequence of common bean proteins, including bioactive sequences with antioxidant properties. A protein isolate, the storage protein phaseolin and a lectin extract from Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Jamapa, were hydrolyzed by treatment with pepsin and pancreatin in order to investigate the possible release of peptides with antioxidant and metal chelating properties. Antioxidant activity was determined in Caco-2 cells exposed to a free radical generator, and iron and copper chelating activities were determined using colorimetric methods. The highest antioxidant activity, 71% inhibition, was found in the hydrolyzed protein isolate. Copper and iron chelating activities were highest in the lectin and phaseolin hydrolysates, 53% and 81%, respectively. Thus, experimental data indicates, as suggested by the database search, that antioxidant peptides are abundant in pepsin–pancreatin hydrolysates, which may represent a valuable health-promoting property in common bean.
    Food Chemistry 04/2012; · 3.33 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: RESUMEN Evaluación bioquímica de fracciones proteínicas de piñón Mexicano (Jatropha curcas L.). Las proteínas de semillas de J. curcas L. se fracciona-ron empleando el método de Osborne y posteriormente se determinaron algunas de sus propiedades bioquímicas y nutricionales. Las fracciones mayoritarias resultaron ser glutelinas (378 g kg –1 de proteína) y globulinas (201 g kg –1 de proteína) mientras que las albúminas y prolaminas fue-ron las fracciones minoritarias. La digestibilidad de la pro-teína resultó ser más alta en las glutelinas y globulinas, con valores de 81 y 80% respectivamente. El análisis por electroforesis mostró que las globulinas y glutelinas pre-sentaron perfiles similares, los resultados sugieren que po-dría existir una relación con proteínas de almacenamiento 2S, 7S y 11S de origen vegetal. Asimismo, de acuerdo con la FAO/WHO, las fracciones proteínicas tuvieron niveles aceptables para la mayoría de los aminoácidos esenciales, sin embargo, las globulinas y glutelinas fueron deficientes en Lys y Trp. PALABRAS CLAVE: Albúminas – Globulinas – Gluteli-nas – Jatropha curcas L. – Prolaminas – Proteínas de alma-cenamiento. SUMMARY Biochemical evaluation of protein fractions from physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). J. curcas seed proteins were fractioned according to the Osborne method and some biochemical properties were determined for these fractions. Glutelins (378 g kg –1 protein) and globulins (201 g kg –1 protein) were the main components. Albumins and prolamins were the minor components. Protein digestibility was highest in glutelins and globulins with values of 81 and 80% respectively. Electrophoresis analysis showed that globulins and glutelins exhibited similar polypeptide profiles. Electrophoresis patterns suggested that there could be a structural relationship among 2S, 7S and 11S storage proteins from plant sources. According to the FAO⁄WHO reference, the protein fractions had acceptable levels of most of the essential amino acids, but its globulins and glutelins were low in lysine and tryptophan.
    Grasas y Aceites 03/2012; 63(3):253-259. · 0.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The changes in SDS-PAGE proteins patterns, oligosaccharides and phenolic compounds of L. campestris seeds, were evaluated during nine germination days. SDS-PAGE pattern showed 12 bands in the original protein seeds, while in the samples after 1–9 germination days, the proteins located in the range of 28–49 and 49–80 kDa indicated an important reduction, and there was an increase in bands about 27 kDa. On the other hand, oligosaccharides showed more than 50% of decrease in its total concentration after 4 germination days; nevertheless after the fifth day, the oligosaccharides concentration increases and rises more than 30% of the original concentration. Phenolic compounds increased their concentration since the first germination day reaching until 450% more than the original seed level. The obtained results are related with liberation or increase of phenolic compounds with antioxidant properties, allowing us to suggest that the germination would be used to produce legume foods for human consumption with better nutraceutical properties.
    International Journal of Agronomy 01/2012; 2012.
  • Hispanic Foods: Chemistry and Bioactive Compounds, 01/2012: chapter MICROSTRUCTURE OF MATURE GREEN MEXICAN VANILLA PODS Vanilla planifolia (Andrews) BY MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUES AND DIGITAL IMAGE ANALYSIS; ACS Books.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 23 factorial design with four replicates of the central trial was used to evaluate wet-fractionation conditions for complete use of hard-to-cook (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds. Tested variables were flour/water ratio (1:5, 1:7.5 and 1:10 w/v), pH (8, 9.5 and 11) and a soaking time (1, 2 and 3 h). The optimum conditions (1:10 w/v flour/water ratio; pH 8; and 1 h soaking time) were determined by the percentages of protein and starch recovery. Three fractions were obtained by the process: a protein isolate, starch fraction and fibrous residue. Isolate crude protein content was 73.03%; its in vitro digestibility was 76.7%, and its amino acids concentrations, except for methionine and cysteine, met essential amino acids requirements for preschool children and adults. Total starch content was 71.41% with an amylose content of 21.46% and an amylopectin content of 78.54%. Total dietary fibre in the fibrous residue was 42.12%, with 81.10% insoluble fibre and 18.91% soluble fibre. The protein isolate’s high protein content, the purity of the starch fraction and high proportion of insoluble fibre in the fibrous residues show wet fractionated hard-to-cook bean to be a promising source of functional ingredients with possible food industry applications.
    Food and Bioprocess Technology 01/2012; · 4.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this work, microstructural changes of the tissues of vanilla were evaluated during the curing, using an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). The morphometric parameters: area (A), perimeter (P), shape factor (SF) and compactness (C) of each tissue (epicarp, mesocarp and vascular bundle) were quanti�ed by Digital Image Analysis (DIA). Results indicated that curing induces structural disruptions of the vanilla tissues which is more pronounced in the mesocarp. Shape factor and compactness showed highest values in pods subjected to 10 cycles of sunning-sweating (10 SS) in which the highest concentration of vanillin and the lowest water looses were detected. It is possible to recommend a reduction of curing time from 20-25 SS cycles to 10.
    Revista mexicana de ingeniería química 01/2011; 10(1):105-115. · 0.56 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Biotechnology - J BIOTECHNOL. 01/2010; 150:309-310.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris protein concentrates were hydrolyzed with the enzymes Alcalase® and Flavourzyme® at different reaction times, and the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory activity, antioxidant properties and amino acid composition measured in the hydrolysates. With Alcalase®, the highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) in P. lunatus was 37.94% at 45 min, and in P. vulgaris was 49.48% at 30 min. With Flavourzyme®, the highest DH's were 22.03% and 26.05%, respectively, both at 90 min. ACE-I inhibitory activity in the Alcalase® hydrolysates was IC50 = 0.056 mg mL−1 for P. lunatus at 90 min, and IC50 = 0.061 mg mL−1 for P. vulgaris at 60 min. In the Flavourzyme® hydrolysates this activity was IC50 = 0.0069 mg mL−1 for P. lunatus at 90 min and IC50 = 0.127 mg mL−1 for P. vulgaris at 45 min. In SDS-PAGE, the hydrolysates exhibited low molecular weight bands. Antioxidant activity was 11.55 mmol L−1 TEAC mg−1 protein for P. lunatus with Flavourzyme® at 90 min and 10.09 mmol L−1 TEAC mg−1 protein for P. vulgaris with Alcalase® at 60 min. Amino acid composition exhibited high amino acid hydrophobic residues content.
    Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft und-Technologie 12/2009; · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:Lupinus campestris seed has a high protein (350–450 g kg−1) and oil (180–200 g kg−1) content, but its use is limited by toxic substances, such as quinolizidine alkaloids (QAs), that can be reduced by debittering thermal treatments (DTTs) which cause biochemical changes in seed compounds such as carbohydrates and proteins and could induce changes in the seed microstructure. This work aims to correlate biochemical and microstructural changes with nutritional composition in lupin seeds in response to DTT.RESULTS: Three DTTs, aqueous (AqT), acid (AcT) and alkaline (AlT), were performed with L. campestris and the effects on nutritional value were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural changes of raw and debittered seeds using image and fractal analysis tools. DTT caused a decrease of QAs, carbohydrate content and protein increase. These effects were more pronounced with A1T. Analysis of microstructural changes indicated decreased rugosity and smoother texture of seed surface subjected to DTT. Smoother surfaces exhibited oval and polyhedrical structures corresponding to globular protein aggregation.CONCLUSIONS: DTT had effects on the seed surface, which showed a smoother texture associated with oval and polyhedrical structures that may be caused by aggregation of globular proteins. These findings allowed associate debittering treatments to microstructural features. Copyright © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 10/2009; 89(14):2399 - 2404. · 1.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A study was done to develop procedures for detoxifying Lupinus mutabilis seeds, and decreasing or eliminating yellow colour in derivatives from them. An evaluation was done of the effect of replacement of wheat flour with the detoxified and decolorized L. mutabilis derivatives on the quality properties of three types of bread products (loaf, bun and sweet).RESULTS: Physicochemical and nutritional analyses coincided with previous reports. The Lupinus protein concentrate and isolate had lower phenolic compound and oligosaccharide concentrations than the untreated seeds. Amino acid composition was determined for wheat flour (WF), L. mutabilis defatted and detoxified flour (LF), L. mutabilis protein concentrate (LPC) and L. mutabilis protein isolate (LPI). The resulting values were used to calculate the replacement levels at which lysine content would be increased significantly in WF–lupin blends. Replacement levels were: LF (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%); LPC (2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%); LPI (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%).CONCLUSION: The detoxifying treatments employed decreased non-nutritional and toxic compounds present in original lupin seed. use of citric acid (1%) reduced yellow coloration in LF and LPC. Copyright © 2008 Society of Chemical Industry
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 03/2008; 88(7):1135 - 1143. · 1.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in the world and Mexico is not exception, since a great number of people suffer of hypertension and the use of synthetic drug for the control of this disease can cause in the organism diverse secondary reactions, such as: cough, taste perturbation, rash in the skin, among others. An alternative for the prevention and/or treatment of high blood pressure is the use of bioactive compounds obtained from natural sources (animal or vegetable) such as the antihypertensive peptides, since these can reduce the arterial pressure in the organism, through of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition which is the responsible in to alter the blood pressure in the organism. Due to the above-mentioned, already exist in the European market, in Japan and USA products diverse that contain tripeptides such as Valine-Proline-Proline (VPP) and Isoleucine-Proline-Proline (IPP) and these they have the capacity in reducing the arterial pressure in human. The aim of this review is to diffuse more the use of antihypertensive peptides as an alternative in the treatment of the arterial pressure.ResumenLas enfermedades cardiovasculares son la principal causa de muerte a nivel mundial y México no es la excepción, ya que existe un gran número de personas que padecen de hipertensión arterial y el uso de medicamentos sintéticos para el control de dicha enfermedad pueden causar diversos efectos secundarios en el organismo, tales como: tos, perturbación en el sabor, salpullido en la piel, entre otros. Por lo que, una alternativa para la prevención y/o tratamiento de la hipertensión arterial es el uso de componentes bioactivos obtenidos de fuentes naturales (animal o vegetal) tales como los péptidos antihipertensivos, ya que estos pueden reducir la presión arterial en el organismo, mediante la inhibición de la enzima convertidora de angiotensina (ECA) la cual es la responsable que se altere la presión sanguínea en el organismo. Debido a lo anterior, ya existen en el mercado Europeo, en Japón y EUA diversos productos que contienen tripéptidos tales como Valina-Prolina-Prolina (VPP) y Ileucina-Prolina-Prolina (IPP) y estos tienen la capacidad en reducir la presión arterial en humanos. Por lo que, el objetivo de esta revisión es difundir el uso de los péptidos antihipertensivos como una alternativa en el tratamiento de la presión arterial.Palabras clave: Proteína, péptidos antihipertensivos, hipertensión arterial, alimento funcional, BIBLIOGRAFÍA
    Ciencia y tecnología alimentaria 01/2008; 6(2):158-168. · 0.09 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lupinus, like Glycine max (soybean), is an ancient leguminous plant. It has been used as a food by people living around the Mediterranean Sea and in the Andean Highlands. This legume contains quinolizidine alkaloids (Qas), oligosaccharides (OGS) and phenolic compounds (PC). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus on the levels of Qas, OGS and PC from L. mutabilis, L. campestris and G. max through tempeh elaboration. The results showed that the soaking and cooking processes of legume seeds diminished the Qas content of L. mutabilis and L. campestris by 50%, and after 48 h of fermentation these compounds decreased by more than 90% in total. OGS diminished by more than 90% in the lupin seeds. The PC content of the three seed species subjected to these processes increased their absorbance value, probably due to the enzymatic action of a fungal tannase. These results suggested that the L. mutabilis, L. campestris and G. max fermentation with R. oligosporus is an efficient method for diminishing antinutritional factors and for obtaining a product with optimal nutritional value. Copyright © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 04/2007; 87(7):1315 - 1322. · 1.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The content of quinolizidine alkaloids (QA) in Lupinus campestris, Fabaceae family, was analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Samples of various organs of Lupinus campestris collected at different monthly stages of the growing plant, were subjected to extraction in a Merck Extrelut column. The quinolizidine alkaloid patterns of stems, leaves, flowers, pods and seeds were assessed and then identified and quantified by GC. Alkaloid structures were identified according to their mass fragmentation patterns, in combination with their indicative Kovats retention index. Alkaloids found in several developmental stages of the plant were mainly: aphyllidine, 5, 6-dehydrolupanine, aphylline, dehydro-oxosparteine, lupanine, α-isolupanine, hydroxyaphylline and hydroxyaphyllidine, plus two alkaloids that -were not identified. During the third month the relative abundance of total alkaloids were highest. The main alkaloids found in seeds were hydroxyaphylline and hydroxyaphyllidine.
    Journal of Food Biochemistry 02/2007; 25(2):117 - 125. · 0.76 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated some of the physicochemical and biochemical factors associated with flesh softening of sapote mamey fruit during development and ripening. The activities of pectinmethylesterase (PME), polygalacturonase (PG) and β-galactosidase (β-GAL) enzymes were measured in fruits harvested at different development stages, and postharvest in two production seasons. The textural changes were most noticeable at the preclimacteric stage in ripening fruit. The water-soluble pectin (WSP) increased at a different rate than firmness decreased. No correlation between PG or PME activity and changes in firmness was observed in ripening fruits, though a low correlation was seen between β-GAL activity and softening in climacteric stage. Greatest loss of firmness occurred in climacteric stage. Fruit pulp softening was not dependent on a single enzyme activity.
    Journal of Food Biochemistry 02/2007; 27(2):91 - 107. · 0.76 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the present work, guava seed storage proteins have been fractionated and characterized. Glutelins (86–90 g/100 g) and globulins (≈10 g/100 g) are the main components of the protein extract. Albumins and prolamins are minor components (≈2 g/100 g). Guava seed glutelin extracts, like rice and amaranth glutelins, are legumine-like proteins that, due to their solubility properties, have to be extracted using extreme pH (borate buffer, pH 10, Gt-Bo; NaOH pH 12 Gt-Na), denaturing (borate buffer plus sodium dodecyl sulfate, Gt-BoSDS) or reducing conditions (borate buffer plus 2-mercaptoethanol, Gt-BoME; borate buffer plus sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, Gt-BoSDSME). The highest yield was obtained with SDS extraction, suggesting that proteins in the seeds form aggregates stabilized mainly by non-covalent interactions. Glutelins are mainly composed of 65 and 67 kD subunits, with a lower proportion of 55 kD subunits. These subunits are formed by disulfide bond-linked polypeptides with molecular masses 40–45 kD, 22–27 kD and 23–25 kD, respectively. The guava seeds protein isolate (GSI) exhibited a polypeptide profile very similar to that of the glutelin fraction.The guava seed could be an alternative source of protein for human and animal consume, additional to this to solve at least in part the pollution problem that fruit processing industry has for discarding this material.
    LWT - Food Science and Technology. 10/2006; 39(8):902–910.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Jatropha curcas L. is a multipurpose shrub of significant economic importance because of its several potential industrial and medicinal uses. Four provenances of J. curcas from different agro-climatic regions of Mexico (1. Castillo de Teayo, 2. Pueblillo 3. Coatzacoalcos and 4. Yautepec), that differed in morphological characteristics, were studied. The seed kernels were rich in crude protein, CP (31–34.5%) and lipid (55–58%). The neutral detergent fibre contents of extracted J. curcas meals were between 3.9% and 4.5% of dry matter (DM). The gross energy of kernels ranged from 31.1 to 31.6 MJ/kg DM. The contents of starch and total soluble sugars were below 6%. The levels of essential amino acids, except lysine, were higher than that of the FAO/WHO reference protein for a five year old child in all the meal samples on a dry matter basis. The major fatty acids found in the oil samples were oleic (41.5–48.8%), linoleic (34.6–44.4%), palmitic (10.5–13.0%) and stearic (2.3–2.8%) acids. We also found previously unreported cis-11-eicosenoic acid (C20:1) and cis-11,14-eicosadienoic acid (C20:2) in the oil. Phorbolesters were present in high concentrations in the kernels of Coatzacoalcos (3.85 mg/g dry meal), but were not detected in the samples from Castillo de Teayo, Pueblillo and Yautepec. Trypsin inhibitors (33.1–36.4 mg trypsin inhibited g−1 dry meal), phytates (8.5–9.3% of dry meal as phytic acid equivalent), saponins (2.1–2.9% of dry meal) and lectins (0.35–1.46 mg/ml of the minimum amount of the sample required to show the agglutination) were the other major antinutrients present in all the seed meals. Different treatments were attempted on the seed meal samples to neutralize the antinutrients present in them. Trypsin inhibitors were easily inactivated with moist heating at 121 °C for 25 min. Phytate levels were slightly decreased by irradiation at 10 kGy. Measured saponin contents were reduced by ethanol extraction and irradiation. Extraction with ethanol, followed by treatment with 0.07% NaHCO3 considerably decreased lectin activity. The same treatment also decreased the phorbolester content by 97.9% in seeds from Coatzacoalcos. The in vitro digestibility of defatted meal (DM) was between 78.6% and 80.6%. It increased to about 86% on heat treatment.
    Food Chemistry 05/2006; · 3.33 Impact Factor