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Publications (8)5.91 Total impact

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    03/2014; 5(March):22-34. DOI:10.1016/j.juogr.2013.12.002.
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    ABSTRACT: Produced water is a byproduct of oil and gas production and represents the largest volume waste stream in the oil and gas industry. Due to the high demand for water and the costs associated with current produced water disposal practices, energy companies and local water users are interested in cost-effective alternatives for beneficial use of produced water. The main objective of this study was to apply a previously developed and publicly available coalbed methane produced water screening tool to two simulated case studies to determine site-specific produced water treatment technologies and beneficial use options, as well as costs, using realistic conditions and assumptions. Case studies were located in the Powder River (Wyoming) and San Juan (New Mexico) Basins. Potential beneficial uses evaluated include crop irrigation, on-site use, potable use, and instream flow augmentation. The screening tool recommended treatment trains capable of generating the water quality required for beneficial use at overall project costs that were comparable to or less than existing produced water disposal costs, given site-specific conditions and source (raw produced) water quality. In this way, the tool may be used to perform a screening-level cost estimate for a particular site to determine whether the costs per barrel for beneficial use are more or less than site-specific disposal costs. The demonstrated technical and economic feasibility provide incentives to address the institutional and legal challenges associated with beneficial use of produced water.
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    ABSTRACT: Hypolimnetic oxygenation, the engineered addition of oxygen gas to the bottom of lakes and reservoirs, can improve water quality by repressing the accumulation of nutrients, metals, and toxic compounds in bottom waters. This paper describes the design and testing of an oxygenation system in Lake Bard, CA. Hypolimnetic oxygen demand, a key design parameter, was estimated through the combination of sediment-water chamber incubations and numerical analysis of water column dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles. Chamber incubations showed that increased water velocity near the sediment-water interface substantially increased the rate of sediment oxygen uptake, and this observation was incorporated into system sizing. The chamber study also confirmed that maintenance of oxygenated conditions repressed sediment release of phosphate, ammonia, manganese, and sulfide. Phosphorus and manganese release rates were 6–8 mg/m/d and 2–5 mg/m/d under anoxic conditions, but negligible or negative under oxic conditions. The novel hypolimnetic oxygenation system used a waste product, oxygen-rich off-gas from an ozone contactor at a nearby water treatment plant, to sustainably improve source water quality. The system was tested over a two week period in June of 2004. Oxygen addition averaged 380 kg/d and increased bottom water DO from 1–2 mg/L to 5–6 mg/L with a concurrent drop in water column phosphate and iron, and a delay in sediment release of ammonia. Manganese, with its slow oxidation kinetics, remained in bottom waters during the oxygenation test, indicating that the oxygenation system needs to be turned on earlier in the season to better control manganese accumulation in bottom waters.
    Lake and reservoir management 09/2012; DOI:10.1080/07438141.2012.716501 · 0.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Water suppliers face increased pressure to explain the relative health risks from non-regulated xenobiotics that may be present in recycled water, including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting compounds. This report reviews their occurrence, fate, and recent human health risk assessments for potable and non-potable water reuse. The most effective advanced treatment for PPCPs is reverse osmosis (RO) followed by advanced oxidation. During soil aquifer treatment, the majority of PPCPs are attenuated relatively quickly (within 100 days), yet some are persistent and can migrate to the underlying groundwater at low concentrations. Recently, several investigations have assessed the potential human health risks associated with xenobiotics in recycled water, focusing on exposure from drinking water (e.g., planned and unplanned indirect potable reuse) and non-potable reuse (e.g., exposure via recreational, occupational, and irrigation-related activities at sites utilizing recycled water). Risk assessments conducted over the last 10 years have found no adverse human health effects or significant risks. Though advanced treatment of wastewater that is discharged or recycled may not be required to protect public health, it may be necessary to prevent potential effects on exposed biota and to address, to some degree, the public's perception of water reuse.
    Human and Ecological Risk Assessment 05/2012; 18(3):517-546. DOI:10.1080/10807039.2012.672883 · 1.08 Impact Factor
  • Jean-Francois Debroux, David W Smith, Craig W Lichty, Dan Carlson
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    ABSTRACT: A set of soil columns was constructed to simulate discharge of disinfected tertiary treated wastewater to a river via nearby land application or indirect discharge. The system was primarily designed to observe the fate of metal ions and nutrients. The following three experiments were conducted: (1) flow through saturated soils only, which simulates indirect discharge where water is directly applied to groundwater; (2) flow through unsaturated soil followed by saturated flow, which simulates vadose then saturated zone transport; and (3) saturated flow only using ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid-metal chelates, which determined effects of metal organic complexes on metal mobility through the soil. Metal ion attenuation was substantial but not complete in experiments 1 and 2 (removal: 68% Cu2+, 43% Ni2+, 98% Pb2+, and 96% Hg2+), which was somewhat contrary to modeling results. Cyanide attenuation was also monitored (92% removal). In experiment 3, lead attenuation was somewhat reduced (92% removal) and delayed (requiring additional residence time); copper attenuation was significantly reduced (38% removal) and delayed; and nickel concentrations were higher in the 28-day sample (> 80 microg/L) than in the column feed water (58 microg/L). Near-complete denitrification and total phosphorus attenuation were observed. For the water quality constituents studied, unsaturated (vadose zone) transport did not appear to add additional benefit.
    Water Environment Research 02/2012; 84(2):134-43. DOI:10.2175/106143011X13173281922473 · 1.00 Impact Factor
  • Jean-François Debroux, Angela Yu-Chen Lin, Jessica Huybregts
    International Seminar on Nuclear War and Planetary Emergencies 36th Session; 07/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Hydraulic tracer tests were performed in the Prado Wetlands, Riverside County, California, USA. The goals of the tests were (1) to evaluate the suitability of rhodamine WT (RWT) as a tracer for wetlands studies, and (2) to determine the residence time distribution of the wetlands. The performance of RWT was evaluated by comparing the breakthrough curve (BTC) of RWT to that of bromide in a pilot-scale test. The BTCs of RWT and bromide indicated equal results. After the pilot test, a full-scale test was conducted by releasing a RWT pulse at the wetlands inlet and monitoring for RWT arrival near the wetlands outlet. The BTC indicated 10 and 90% (of the total mass recovered) breakthrough times of 25 and 112 h, respectively, but these must be considered approximations because only 29% of the injected RWT mass was recovered. Laboratory experiments suggest irreversible sorption to be the principal loss mechanism of RWT during transport through the wetlands. RWT is a suitable tracer in wetlands that are relatively small (less than 1 week residence time) and deep (at least 0.6 m) with limited sediment contact, but RWT yields only approximate results for the extended wetlands system.
    Ecological Engineering 03/2003; DOI:10.1016/S0925-8574(03)00005-3 · 3.04 Impact Factor