G Wouchuk

University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Castille-La Mancha, Spain

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Publications (9)7.94 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper we propose a novel experimental scheme, named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS), to study interiors of the giant planets in our solar system as well as exoplanets. This scheme involves low-entropy compression of a test material like hydrogen or ice that is imploded in a multi-layered cylindrical target driven by an intense heavy ion beam. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of implosion of a typical LAPLAS target assuming beam parameters that will be available at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, are reported, that demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. Moreover, it is shown that the target implosion will be robust and will be stable towards hydrodynamic instabilities. This work has been done within the framework of the High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams (HEDgeHOB) collaboration.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 01/2009; 606(1-2):177-185. · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Field of High Energy Density (HED) physics is very important from the scientific as well as technological point of view and due to these reasons, it has been an area of very active research over the past many decades. Static as well as dynamic experimental configurations have been used to study this subject. Recently, a new approach that involves isochoric and uniform heating of matter by intense ion beams, has been proposed to generate HED sates in the laboratory. Extensive theoretical work has been carried out to propose various experiment designs employing this technique. In this paper we describe one of these proposed experiments that can be used to study planetary interiors in the laboratory and is named LAPLAS (LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences). Detailed analysis of implosion and hydrodynamic stability of the target is presented.
    Astrophysics and Space Science 01/2009; 322(1):179-188. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports an overview of the extensive theoretical work that has been carried out over the past few years to explore the capabilities of intense beams of energetic heavy ions to study High Energy Density (HED) states in matter. This work has shown that an intense ion beam can be a very efficient driver for disparate experimental schemes suitable to study this important field of research. These include HIHEX [Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion] that involves generation of required HED states by isochoric and uniform heating of matter by the ion beam that is followed by isentropic expansion. Another proposed experimental set up is named LAPLAS that stands for LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences. This latter experiment has been designed to generate physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. This is achieved by a low-entropy compression of the sample material (hydrogen or ice). A third scheme involves a ramp (shockless) compression of a test material which will allow one to investigate the material properties, like yield strength, under dynamic conditions.
    Journal of Physics Conference Series 06/2008; 112(4):042025.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a review of the theoretical work that has resulted in a scientific proposal on studies of High-Energy-Density (HED) states in matter using intense beams of energetic heavy ions that will be available at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt [W.F. Henning, Nucl. Inst. Meth B 24 (2003) 725-729]. The proposal is named HEDgeHOB that stands for High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams. Two experimental schemes have been worked out for the HEDgeHOB experimental proposal, namely, HIHEX and LAPLAS. The first scheme allows for studies of HED states by isochoric and uniform heating of matter by an intense heavy ion beam that is followed by isentropic expansion of the heated material. Numerical simulations have shown that using the beam parameters that will be available at the FAIR, one can access all the interesting physical states of HED matter including an expanded hot liquid state, twophase liquid-gas region, critical point parameters and strongly coupled plasmas for all the materials of interest. The second scheme involves a low-entropy compression of a test material like hydrogen that is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high-Z material like gold or lead. The target can be driven by a hollow or a circular beam. This compression scheme relies on multiple shock reflection between the hydrogen-gold (lead) boundary and the cylinder axis. The hydrodynamic stability of the LAPLAS target has also been analyzed that shows that the implosion is completely stable to Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. LAPLAS implosion using a hollow beam is suitable for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization whereas the one employing a circular focal spot leads to physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. (© 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)
    Contributions to Plasma Physics 01/2007; 47(4-5):223-233. · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an overview of the theoretical work that has been carried out during the past few years to assess the capabilities of intense heavy ion beams to induce states of High-Energy Density (HED) in matter. This work has shown that two different experimental schemes can be used to study HED physics employing intense ion beams. These schemes have been named HIHEX [Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion] and LAPLAS [LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences], respectively. The first scheme involves isochoric and uniform heating and subsequent isentropic expansion of matter while the latter deals with low entropy compression of matter using multiple shock reflection technique. This work has been done within the framework of the HEDgeHOB [High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams] collaboration that has been formed to organize and facilitate construction of experimental facilities and later to perform experimental work in the field of HED matter at the future accelerator facility, FAIR [Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research].
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 01/2007; 577(1-2):238-249. · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents detailed numerical simulations and theoretical analysis of different possible experimental schemes to study the thermophysical and transport properties of High Energy Density (HED) matter generated by the interaction of intense heavy ion beams. The considered beam parameters are those which will be available at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt [W.F. Henneing, Nucl. Instrum. Methods, B214, (2004) 211]. This work has shown that an intense heavy ion beam can be used employing two very different configurations to study HED states in matter. In the first scheme, a sample material is uniformly and isochorically heated by the beam and the heated material is subsequently allowed to expand isentropically. Depending on the specific energy deposited in the material, one may access all the interesting physical states, including that of an expanded hot liquid (EHL), two-phase liquid–gas (2PLG) region, critical point (CP) parameters as well as strongly coupled plasma (SCP) states during the expansion. This scheme is named HIHEX (Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion). We have considered a 1 GeV/u uranium beam with an intensity, N = 1010–1012 ions that are delivered in a single bunch, 50 ns long. The particle intensity distribution in the transverse direction is assumed to be Gaussian with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the range of 1–4 mm. We note that the estimated critical temperatures for many metals are very high which are very difficult to access using traditional techniques of shock compression of matter. Employing the proposed HIHEX scheme, one can easily achieve the required temperature by depositing corresponding specific energy in the sample. Solid as well as porous targets have been used in our study.In the second scheme, a sample material like frozen hydrogen that is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high-Z material like gold or lead, is imploded by the ion beam. This scheme is specially designed to generate multiple reflection of shocks in the target that leads to a low-entropy compression of the sample material. As a result of this, one achieves super-high densities (up to 30 times solid density) and ultrahigh pressures (3–30 Mbar) in the hydrogen. If one uses a hollow beam with an annular focal spot, hydrogen is not directly heated by the ion beam that leads to a low final temperature (of the order of a few thousand K). This scheme is therefore suitable to study the problem of hydrogen metallization. In case one uses a circular focal spot, although the hydrogen is strongly heated by the beam, one still achieves a very high compression because the pressure in the surrounding shell is orders of magnitude higher than that in hydrogen. However, in this case the final hydrogen temperature is much higher (of the order of a few eV) than in the previous case. This configuration is thus suitable to study the interiors of the giant planets and is named LAPLAS (LAboratory PLAnetary Science). We have also analyzed the hydrodynamic stability of the LAPLAS target and we find that the Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) and Richtmeyer–Meshkov (RM) instabilities will not pose any serious problems to this scheme.
    High Energy Density Physics. 01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are believed to be a very efficient and novel tool to create states of High-Energy-Density (HED) in matter. This paper shows with the help of numerical simulations that the heavy ion beams that will be generated at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR)[W.F. Henning, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 214, 211 (2004)] will allow one to use two different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. First scheme named HIHEX (Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion), will generate high-pressure, high-entropy states in matter by volumetric isochoric heating. The heated material will then be allowed to expand isentropically. Using this scheme, it will be possible to study important regions of the phase diagram that are either difficult to access or are even unaccessible using traditional methods of shock compression. The second scheme would allow one to achieve low-entropy compression of a sample material like hydrogen or water to produce conditions that are believed to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. This scheme is named LAPLAS (LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences).
    Journal de Physique IV (Proceedings) 01/2006; 133:1059-1064. · 0.29 Impact Factor
  • A R Piriz, G Wouchuk
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    ABSTRACT: A simple model for the description of the ablative implosion of a thin spherical shell filled with fuel gas is presented. The model gives the fuel conditions before the beginning of the stagnation phase. Therefore, it can be applied to recent experiments producing a high neutron yield in which that phase was affected by instabilities. The model is compared with experiments, and scaling laws are found in agreement with the simulation and experimental results.
    Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 12/2000; 32(6):469. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One of the important experiments that will be carried out at the Future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) has been named LAPLAS that stands for Labora- tory Planetary Sciences (1, 2). The target proposed for this experimental scheme is a multi-layered cylindrical tar- get that contains a cylinder of frozen hydrogen that is en- closed in a heavy shell of a high-Z material like gold or lead. The target is irradiated facially along the length of the cylinder and the hydrogen is compressed due to the high pressure generated in the beam heated region of the surrounding shell. Two type of hydrodynamic instabilities, namely, Rayleigh- Taylor (RT) and Richtmeyer- Meshkov (RM) have the potential to destroy the implosion. In this contribution we present analysis to investigate the develop- ment of these two instabilities.