Hui Wang

Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (6)32.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to identify risk factors for the development of bacteremic pneumonia and to evaluate the impact of bacteremia on the outcome of pneumococcal pneumonia. METHODS: Using a database from a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia, we compared data of the bacteremic group with that of the non-bacteremic group. RESULTS: Among 981 adult patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 114 (11.6%) patients who had documented pneumococcal bacteremia were classified into the bacteremic group. In a multivariable analysis, use of immunosuppressant drugs, younger age (<65 years), and DM were independent risk factors associated with the development of bacteremic pneumonia among patients with pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). The mortality rate was significantly higher in the bacteremic group than in the non-bacteremic group (28.6% vs. 8.5%; P < 0.001). The multivariable analysis revealed that concomitant bacteremia was one of the significant risk factors associated with mortality (OR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.24-5.29), along with cerebrovascular disease and presentation with septic shock (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Bacteremia was a common finding in pneumococcal pneumonia and was associated with a higher mortality rate. Several clinical variables may be useful for predicting bacteremic pneumonia among patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.
    The Journal of infection 08/2012; 66(1). DOI:10.1016/j.jinf.2012.08.011 · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a serious concern worldwide, particularly in Asian countries, despite the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). The Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens (ANSORP) performed a prospective surveillance study of 2,184 S. pneumoniae isolates collected from patients with pneumococcal infections from 60 hospitals in 11 Asian countries from 2008 to 2009. Among nonmeningeal isolates, the prevalence rate of penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml) was 4.6% and penicillin resistance (MIC, ≥ 8 μg/ml) was extremely rare (0.7%). Resistance to erythromycin was very prevalent in the region (72.7%); the highest rates were in China (96.4%), Taiwan (84.9%), and Vietnam (80.7%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 59.3% of isolates from Asian countries. Major serotypes were 19F (23.5%), 23F (10.0%), 19A (8.2%), 14 (7.3%), and 6B (7.3%). Overall, 52.5% of isolates showed PCV7 serotypes, ranging from 16.1% in Philippines to 75.1% in Vietnam. Serotypes 19A (8.2%), 3 (6.2%), and 6A (4.2%) were the most prominent non-PCV7 serotypes in the Asian region. Among isolates with serotype 19A, 86.0% and 79.8% showed erythromycin resistance and MDR, respectively. The most remarkable findings about the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Asian countries after the introduction of PCV7 were the high prevalence of macrolide resistance and MDR and distinctive increases in serotype 19A.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 03/2012; 56(3):1418-26. DOI:10.1128/AAC.05658-11 · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remain important causes of morbidity and mortality. Increasing antimicrobial resistance has aroused the concern of the failure of antibiotic treatment. To determine the distribution of the bacterial isolates of HAP and VAP, their antimicrobial resistance patterns, and impact of discordant antibiotic therapy on clinical outcome in Asian countries A prospective surveillance study was conducted in 73 hospitals in 10 Asian countries from 2008-2009. A total of 2,554 cases with HAP or VAP in adults were enrolled and 2,445 bacterial isolates were collected from 1,897 cases. Clinical characteristics and antimicrobial resistance profiles were analyzed. Major bacterial isolates from HAP and VAP cases in Asian countries were Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imipenem resistance rates of Acinetobacter and P. aeruginosa were 67.3% and 27.2%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant rates were 82% and 42.8%, and extensively drug-resistant rates were 51.1% and 4.9%. Multidrug-resistant rate of K. pneumoniae was 44.7%. Oxacillin resistance rate of S. aureus was 82.1%. All-cause mortality rate was 38.9%. Discordant initial empirical antimicrobial therapy increased the likelihood of pneumonia-related mortality (odds ratio, 1.542; 95% confidence interval, 1.127-2.110). Acinetobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and K. pneumoniae are the most frequent isolates from adults with HAP or VAP in Asian countries. These isolates are highly resistant to major antimicrobial agents, which could limit the therapeutic options in the clinical practice. Discordant initial empirical antimicrobial therapy significantly increases the likelihood of pneumonia-related mortality.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 09/2011; 184(12):1409-17. DOI:10.1164/rccm.201102-0349OC · 11.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is highly prevalent in hospitals in many Asian countries. Recent emergence of community-associated (CA) MRSA worldwide has added another serious concern to the epidemiology of S. aureus infections. To understand the changing epidemiology of S. aureus infections in Asian countries, we performed a prospective, multinational surveillance study with molecular typing analysis. We evaluated the prevalence of methicillin resistance in S. aureus isolates in CA and healthcare-associated (HA) infections, and performed molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility tests of MRSA isolates. MRSA accounted for 25.5% of CA S. aureus infections and 67.4% of HA infections. Predominant clones of CA-MRSA isolates were ST59-MRSA-SCCmec type IV-spa type t437, ST30-MRSA-SCCmec type IV-spa type t019 and ST72-MRSA-SCCmec type IV-spa type t324. Previously established nosocomial MRSA strains including sequence type (ST) 239 and ST5 clones were found among CA-MRSA isolates from patients without any risk factors for HA-MRSA infection. CA-MRSA clones such as ST59, ST30 and ST72 were also isolated from patients with HA infections. Our findings confirmed that MRSA infections in the community have been increasing in Asian countries. Data also suggest that various MRSA clones have spread between the community and hospitals as well as between countries.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 02/2011; 66(5):1061-9. DOI:10.1093/jac/dkr024 · 5.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to identify the predictors of mortality and to evaluate the impact of methicillin resistance on outcome in patients with Staphylococcus aureus infection according to underlying conditions and type of infection. An observational cohort study including 4949 patients with S. aureus infection was conducted. We compared data from patients with MRSA infection with those with MSSA infection. The 30-day mortality rate of MRSA group was significantly higher than that of MSSA group (15.6% vs. 6.2%, P < 0.001). However, MRSA infection was not found to be independent risk factor for mortality after adjusting for other variables (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.80-1.32). When we analyzed patients with S. aureus bacteremia (n = 709), MRSA infection was found to be significantly associated with mortality in multivariate analysis (Adjusted OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.15-2.49). When the 30-day mortality rates were compared according to underlying diseases, the 30-day mortality rate of MRSA group was significantly higher than that of MSSA group in patients with malignancy or renal diseases. MRSA infection was also found to be one of the independent risk factors for mortality in patients with malignancy (adjusted OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.06-2.70) and in those with renal disease (adjusted OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.0-2.89), after adjustment for host variables. Methicillin resistance adversely affected the outcome of patients with S. aureus infection, in patients with cancer or renal disease and in those with S. aureus bacteremia, although MRSA infection was not found to be significantly associated with higher mortality in overall patient population.
    The Journal of infection 10/2010; 61(4):299-306. DOI:10.1016/j.jinf.2010.07.011 · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many different treatment options are available for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), which are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Although guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP have been published by various American and European societies, these guidelines may not be applicable in all respects to the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP in Asian countries. In addition, clinical practice may vary among Asian countries, due to such factors as availability of specific antibiotics and formulations and their relative cost. In addition, and in particular, different epidemiologic, etiologic, and resistance patterns in Asian countries may affect treatment choices compared with those in Western countries. To address these issues, the Asian-Pacific Research Foundation for Infectious Diseases, together with the Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens, organized the Asian HAP Working Group to discuss current clinical practices and develop consensus treatment recommendations for HAP in Asian countries. The consensus treatment recommendations, summarized herein, represent the findings of an expert panel comprising 30 representatives from 10 Asian countries.
    American journal of infection control 06/2008; 36(4 Suppl):S83-92. DOI:10.1016/j.ajic.2007.01.015 · 2.33 Impact Factor