J Kim

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Are you J Kim?

Claim your profile

Publications (7)15.05 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The insular (IC) and cingulate cortices (CC) are critically involved in pain perception. Previously we demonstrated that fibromyalgia (FM) patients have greater connectivity between the insula and Default Mode Network at rest, and that changes in the degree of this connectivity were associated with changes in the intensity of ongoing clinical pain. Here we more thoroughly evaluate the degree of resting state connectivity to multiple regions of the IC in individuals with FM and healthy controls (HC). We also investigated the relationship between connectivity, experimental pain and current clinical chronic pain. Functional connectivity was assessed using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in 18 FM patients and 18 age- and sex-matched HC using pre-defined seed regions in the anterior, middle and posterior IC. FM patients exhibited greater connectivity between: (1) right mid IC and right mid/posterior CC and right mid IC; (2) right posterior IC and the left CC; and (3) right anterior IC and left superior temporal gyrus. HCs displayed greater connectivity between: left anterior IC and the bilateral medial frontal gyrus/ACC; and left posterior IC and the right superior frontal gyrus. Within the FM group, greater connectivity between the IC and CC was associated with decreased pressure-pain thresholds. These data provide further support for altered resting-state connectivity between the IC and other brain regions known to participate in pain perception/modulation playing a pathogenic role in conditions such as FM. We speculate that altered IC connectivity is associated with the experience of chronic pain in individuals with fibromyalgia.
    The journal of pain: official journal of the American Pain Society 05/2014; · 3.78 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The insular (IC) and cingulate cortices (CC) are critically involved in pain perception. Previously we demonstrated that fibromyalgia (FM) patients have greater connectivity between the insula and Default Mode Network at rest, and that changes in the degree of this connectivity were associated with changes in the intensity of ongoing clinical pain. Here we more thoroughly evaluate the degree of resting state connectivity to multiple regions of the IC in individuals with FM and healthy controls (HC). We also investigated the relationship between connectivity, experimental pain and current clinical chronic pain. Functional connectivity was assessed using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in 18 FM patients and 18 age- and sex-matched HC using pre-defined seed regions in the anterior, middle and posterior IC. FM patients exhibited greater connectivity between: (1) right mid IC and right mid/posterior CC and right mid IC; (2) right posterior IC and the left CC; and (3) right anterior IC and left superior temporal gyrus. HCs displayed greater connectivity between: left anterior IC and the bilateral medial frontal gyrus/ACC; and left posterior IC and the right superior frontal gyrus. Within the FM group, greater connectivity between the IC and CC was associated with decreased pressure-pain thresholds. Perspective These data provide further support for altered resting-state connectivity between the IC and other brain regions known to participate in pain perception/modulation playing a pathogenic role in conditions such as FM. We speculate that altered IC connectivity is associated with the experience of chronic pain in individuals with fibromyalgia.
    The Journal of Pain. 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nausea is associated with significant morbidity, and there is a wide range in the propensity of individuals to experience nausea. The neural basis of the heterogeneity in nausea susceptibility is poorly understood. Our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in healthy adults showed that a visual motion stimulus caused activation in the right MT+/V5 area, and that increased sensation of nausea due to this stimulus was associated with increased activation in the right anterior insula. For the current study, we hypothesized that individual differences in visual motion-induced nausea are due to microstructural differences in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), the white matter tract connecting the right visual motion processing area (MT+/V5) and right anterior insula. To test this hypothesis, we acquired diffusion tensor imaging data from 30 healthy adults who were subsequently dichotomized into high and low nausea susceptibility groups based on the Motion Sickness Susceptibility Scale. We quantified diffusion along the IFOF for each subject based on axial diffusivity (AD); radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), and evaluated between-group differences in these diffusion metrics. Subjects with high susceptibility to nausea rated significantly (P < 0.001) higher nausea intensity to visual motion stimuli and had significantly (P < 0.05) lower AD and MD along the right IFOF compared to subjects with low susceptibility to nausea. This result suggests that differences in white matter microstructure within tracts connecting visual motion and nausea-processing brain areas may contribute to nausea susceptibility or may have resulted from an increased history of nausea episodes.
    Neurogastroenterology and Motility 01/2013; · 2.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 06/2012; 12(1). · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A visual display of stripes was used to examine cardiovagal response to motion sickness. Heart rate variability (HRV) was investigated using dynamic methods to discern instantaneous fluctuations in reaction to stimulus and perception-based events. A novel point process adaptive recursive algorithm was applied to the R-R series to compute instantaneous heart rate, HRV, and high frequency (HF) power as a marker of vagal activity. Results show interesting dynamic trends in each of the considered subjects. HF power averaged across ten subjects indicates a significant decrease 20s to 60s following the transition from ¿no nausea¿ to ¿mild.¿ Conversely, right before ¿strong¿ nausea, the group average shows a transient trending increase in HF power. Findings confirm gradual sympathetic activation with increasing nausea, and further evidence transitory increases in vagal tone before flushes of strong nausea.
    Computers in Cardiology, 2009; 10/2009
  • NeuroImage 01/2009; 47. · 6.25 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A visual display of stripes was used to examine cardio-vagal response to motion sickness. Heart rate variability (HRV) was investigated using dynamic methods to discern instantaneous fluctuations in reaction to stimulus and perception-based events. A novel point process adaptive recursive algorithm was applied to the R-R series to compute instantaneous heart rate, HRV, and high frequency (HF) power as a marker of vagal activity. Results show interesting dynamic trends in each of the considered subjects. HF power averaged across ten subjects indicates a significant decrease 20s to 60s following the transition from "no nausea" to "mild." Conversely, right before "strong" nausea, the group average shows a transient trending increase in HF power. Findings confirm gradual sympathetic activation with increasing nausea, and further evidence transitory increases in vagal tone before flushes of strong nausea.
    Computers in cardiology 01/2009; 36:49-52.