R. J. Bastasz

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States

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Publications (6)4.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Quantifying the flux and energy of charge exchange neutrals to the walls of fusion experiments is important to understanding wall erosion and energy balance. Quantification of these fluxes is made much more difficult because they have very strong poloidal and toroidal variations. To facilitate such measurements, we have been developing compact, palladium metal oxide semiconductor (Pd-MOS) detectors. These devices are dosemetric detectors, which can evaluate differences between plasma discharges. To become widely used, however, such detectors must be made resistant to UV and x-ray induced damage, as well as high energy particle bombardment. We report here on the fabrication of Schottky diode Pd-MOS devices in which we have minimized the oxide thickness (to reduce the production of charges from UV and x-rays) and increased the Pd overlayer (to reduce charge production from high energy particles). The fabrication has been facilitated through use of an array of metallic posts to improve the Pd film adhesion. The efficacy of the film adhesion and comparison with standard detectors will be examined. Testing and calibration of the detectors is reported as a function of hydrogen flux and energy.
    11/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Erosion of the main chamber plasma-facing components is of concern for ITER. Plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied in DIII-D using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics. Fast camera data shows that edge localized modes (ELMs) feature helical filamentary structures propagating towards the outboard wall. Upon reaching the wall, filaments result in regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to two orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. A moderate change of the gap between the separatrix and the outer wall strongly affects PMI intensity at the wall. Material samples exposed near the outboard wall showed net carbon deposition in high-density discharges (near the Greenwald limit) and tendency towards net erosion in lower density discharges (similar to 0.45 of the Greenwald limit). (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Nuclear Materials 01/2009; 390-91:785-788. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A strong effect of a moderately elevated surface temperature on net carbon deposition and deuterium co-deposition in the DIII-D divertor was observed under detached conditions. A graphite DiMES sample with a 2 mm wide, 18 mm deep gap lined with silicon catcher plates was exposed to lower-single-null (LSN) L-mode plasmas first at room temperature, and then pre-heated to 200°C by a built-in electrical heater. At the elevated temperature, deuterium co-deposition in the gap was reduced by an order of magnitude. At the plasma-facing surface of the pre-heated sample net carbon erosion was measured at a rate of 3 nm/s, whereas without pre-heating net deposition is normally observed under detachment. In a related experiment three sets of molybdenum mirrors recessed 2 cm below the divertor floor were exposed to identical LSN ELMy H-mode discharges. The first set of mirrors exposed at ambient temperature exhibited net carbon deposition at a rate of up to 3.7 nm/s and suffered a significant drop in reflectivity. In contrast, two other mirror sets exposed at elevated temperatures between 90°C and 175ºC exhibited practically no carbon deposition and their optical reflectivity in the wavelength range above 500 nm was essentially preserved.
    Physica Scripta 03/2007; T128:29-34. · 1.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Divertor Materials Evaluation System (DiMES) at General Atomics has successfully advanced the understanding of plasma surface interaction phenomena involving ITER-relevant materials and has been utilized for advanced diagnostic designs in the lower divertor of DIII-D. This paper describes a series of recent successful experiments. These include the study of carbon deposition in gaps and metallic mirrors as a function of temperature, study of dust migration from the divertor, study of methane injection in order to benchmark chemical sputtering diagnostics, and the measurement of charge exchange neutrals with a hydrogen sensor. In concert with the modification of the lower divertor of DIII-D, the DiMES sample vertical location was modified to match the raised divertor floor. The new Mid-plane Material Exposure Sample (MiMES) design will also be presented. MiMES will allow the study and measurement of erosion and redeposition of material at the outboard mid-plane of DIII-D, including effects from convective transport. We will continue to expose relevant materials and advanced diagnostics to different plasma configurations under various operational regimes, including material erosion and redeposition experiments, and gaps and mirror exposures at elevated temperature.
    Journal of Nuclear Materials 01/2007; 363-365:276-281. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mission of the Divertor Materials Evaluation System (DiMES) in DIII-D is to establish an integrated data base from measurements in the divertor of a tokamak in order to address some of the ITER and fusion power reactor plasma material interaction issues. Carbon and metal coatings of Be, W, V, and Mo were exposed to the steady-state outer strike point on DIII-D for 4–18 s. These short exposure times ensure controlled exposure conditions, and the extensive arrays of DIII-D divertor diagnostics provide a well-characterized plasma for modeling efforts. Post-exposure analysis provides a direct measure of surface material erosion rates and the amount of retained deuterium. For carbon, these results match closely with the results of accumulated carbon deposition and erosion, and the corresponding deuterium retention of long term exposure tiles in DIII-D. Deuterium retention of different materials was measured using the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction (W.R. Wampler, R. Bastasz, D. Buchenauer et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 233 (1995) 791–797). For carbon, these measurements showed peak deuterium areal density of about 8 × 1018 D/cm2 in a co-deposited layer about 6 μm deep, mainly at the usually detached inboard divertor leg. That layer of carbon near the inner divertor strike point has an atomic saturation concentration of D/C ≈ 0.25, which is not significantly lower than the laboratory-measured saturation retention of 0.4. Under the carbon-contaminated background plasma of DIII-D, metal coatings of Be, V, Mo, and W were exposed to the steady-state outer strike point under ELMing and ELM-free H-mode discharges. The rate of material erosion and deuterium retention were measured. As expected, W shows the lowest erosion rate at 0.1 nm/s and the lowest deuterium uptake of 2 × 1020 m2.
    Journal of Nuclear Materials 10/1998; · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to withstand disruptions makes carbon-based materials attractive for use as plasma-facing components in divertors. However, such materials suffer high erosion rates during attached plasma operation which, in high power long pulse machines, would give short component lifetimes and high tritium inventories. The authors present results from recent experiments in DIII-D, in which the Divertor Materials Evaluation System (DiMES) was used to examine erosion and deposition during short exposures to well defined plasma conditions. These studies show that during operation with detached plasmas, produced by gas injection, net erosion is suppressed everywhere in the divertor. Net deposition of carbon with deuterium was observed at the inner and outer strikepoints and in the private-flux region between strikepoints. For these low temperature plasmas (T{sub e} < 2eV), physical sputtering is eliminated. These results show that with detached plasmas, the location of carbon net erosion and the carbon impurity source, probably lies outside the divertor. Physical or chemical sputtering by charge-exchange neutrals or ions in the main plasma chamber is a probable source of carbon under these plasma conditions.