C Ricci

Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Latium, Italy

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Publications (90)202.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to assess the quality of lung preservation offered by Euro-Collins solution (EC), Cold Modified Blood solution (CMB) and low potassium University of Wisconsin solution (UWLP). Fifteen right lung auto-transplantations (five for each solution) in the pig (Large White) were performed after 2 h of cold ischaemic storage in physiological solution at 4 degrees C. Right lung biopsies were performed before ischaemia and 30 min after reperfusion, for histoenzymatic, histopathological and electron microscope studies. After reperfusion, significant alterations were observed in the haemodynamics with only the right lung perfused; pulmonary arteriolar resistance increased by a factor of 5 in the EC group, by a factor of 4 in the CMB group and by a factor of 1.2 in the UWLP group; the right ventricular ejection fraction fell by 60% in the EC group, by 50% in the CMB group and by 31% in the UWLP group. Haemodynamic impairment was lower in the UWLP group (P<0.05; P<0.001) as was ischaemic-reperfusion injury (P<0.05). Oedema was observed in the EC group and extensive alveolar wall damage in the CMB group. Hypoxaemia was observed in all groups but the differences in the degree of hypoxaemia were not significant. The authors concluded that UWLP solution was the most effective of the three in this transplant model.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 04/2001; 19(3):333-8. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical treatment of bullous emphysema has received renewed attention because of recent advances in minimally invasive techniques. We describe our experience in the thoracoscopic management of patients with bullous emphysema over the last 5 years. Twenty-five patients (24 male, one female) with a mean age of 57 years with giant bullae associated with various degree of underlying emphysema, were operated on thoracoscopically at our Institution. The severity of the emphysema was classified according to the criteria of the American Thoracic Society: five patients were in stage I (FEV 1 > 50%), eight patients were in stage II (FEV1 35 to 49%) and 12 patients were in stage III (FEV1 < 35%). Nine patients underwent operation to treat complications related to bullae, 12 presented dyspnoea and four were asymptomatic. We performed 23 unilateral and two bilateral staged thoracoscopic procedures. No intraoperative complications developed. Mean operative time was 107+/-25 min. No patient dead. Mean post-operative chest tube duration was 8+/-4.13 days and mean post-operative hospital stay was 11+/-5.76 days. The most frequent post-operative complication was air-leakage that in 12 patients lasted more than 7 days. Pulmonary function tests were obtained 3-6 months after the operation and statistical comparison between pre-operative and post-operative data was performed using Student's paired t-test. We observed best results in I and II stage patients, but also stage III patients experienced clinical improvement and better quality of life. Our experience supports the safety and effectiveness of video-assisted thoracoscopy for the treatment of giant bullae. Minimally invasive approach is fully justified especially in the group of patients with severe impairment of lung function.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 07/1999; 15(6):753-6; discussion 756-7. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Thymectomy is considered an effective therapeutic option for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). We reviewed our 27-year experience with surgical treatment of MG with respect to long-term results and factors affecting outcome. Methods: Between 1970 and 1997, we performed 232 thymectomies for MG. Fifteen patients were lost to follow-up; the remaining 217 form the object of our study. Sixty-two patients (28.4%) had thymoma. Myasthenia was graded according to a modified Osserman classification: 51 patients (23.5%) were in class I, 81(37.3%) in class IIA, 52 (24%) in class IIB, 26 (12%) in class III and seven (3.2%) in class IV. Mean duration of symptoms before the operation was 12±10 months. Fifty-eight thymectomies for thymoma were performed through a median sternotomy and four through a clamshell incision. Forty-six thymectomies for non-thymomatous MG were performed through a standard cervicotomy, 101 procedures through a partial upper sternal-splitting incision and eight through a complete median sternotomy. Results: Operative mortality was 0.92% (two patients). After a mean follow-up of 119 months, 71% of all patients improved their clinical status (25% without medications and asymptomatic; 46% with a reduction of medications and/or clinically improved); 39 (18%) have a stable disease with no clinical modifications; 12 (5%) presented a deterioration of their clinical status with worse symptoms, required more medications, or both. Thirteen patients (6%) died because of MG (mean survival 34.3±3.6 months). The presence of a thymoma negatively influenced the prognosis. Younger patients showed a more favorable outcome as well as patients with a shorter duration of symptoms before the operation; patients with lower classes of myasthenia showed a higher rate of remission. Conclusions: Thymectomy is effective in the management of patients with MG at all stages with low morbidity. Patients with thymoma present a less favorable outcome.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 06/1999; · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We used induction chemotherapy in a prospective, single-institution clinical trial intended to achieve resectability in patients with centrally located, unresectable T4 non-small cell lung cancer. Other types of IIIB disease were excluded. Between January 1990 and April 1996, we enrolled 57 patients with histologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer. Eligibility criteria for T4 were clinical (superior vena cava syndrome, 9 patients), vocal cord paralysis (6 patients), dysphagia from esophageal involvement (1 patient), radiologic (computed tomography and magnetic resonance evidence of infiltration, 10 patients), bronchoscopic (tracheal infiltration, 11 patients), and thoracoscopic (histologically proven mediastinal infiltration, 20 patients). After 3 cycles of cisplatin (120 mg/m2), vinblastine (4 mg/m2), and mitomycin (2 mg/m2), patients were reevaluated. Forty-two patients (73%; 36 men, 6 women; age range, 42-75 years; mean, 58 years) responded to therapy and underwent thoracotomy; 11 patients did not respond, and 4 patients had major toxicity. Thirty-six patients (63% of the entire group) had complete resection. We performed 4 exploratory thoracotomies, 6 pneumonectomies, 32 lobectomies (20 procedures were associated with reconstruction of hilar-mediastinal structures). Overall, 4 patients had no histologic evidence of disease. We had 2 bronchopleural fistulas with 1 death and 5 other major complications. Overall survival at 1 and 4 years is 61.4% and 19.5%, respectively. Forty-two patients (73%) underwent exploratory operation, with a 4-year survival of 25.9%; 36 patients (63%) had complete resection, with a 4-year survival of 30.5%. Induction chemotherapy is effective for downstaging and surgical reconversion of centrally located T4 non-small cell lung cancer. Survival is promising, especially in patients whose disease becomes resectable.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 03/1999; 117(2):225-33. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Thymectomy is considered an effective therapeutic option for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). We reviewed our 27-year experience with surgical treatment of MG with respect to long-term results and factors affecting outcome. Methods: Between 1970 and 1997, we performed 232 thymectomies for MG. Fifteen patients were lost to follow-up; the remaining 217 form the object of our study. Sixty-two patients (28.4%) had thymoma. Myasthenia was graded according to a modified Osserman classification: 51 patients (23.5%) were in class I, 81(37.3%) in class IIA, 52 (24%) in class IIB, 26 (12%) in class III and seven (3.2%) in class IV. Mean duration of symptoms before the operation was 12±10 months. Fifty-eight thymectomies for thymoma were performed through a median sternotomy and four through a clamshell incision. Forty-six thymectomies for non-thymomatous MG were performed through a standard cervicotomy, 101 procedures through a partial upper sternal-splitting incision and eight through a complete median sternotomy. Results: Operative mortality was 0.92% (two patients). After a mean follow-up of 119 months, 71% of all patients improved their clinical status (25% without medications and asymptomatic; 46% with a reduction of medications and/or clinically improved); 39 (18%) have a stable disease with no clinical modifications; 12 (5%) presented a deterioration of their clinical status with worse symptoms, required more medications, or both. Thirteen patients (6%) died because of MG (mean survival 34.3±3.6 months). The presence of a thymoma negatively influenced the prognosis. Younger patients showed a more favorable outcome as well as patients with a shorter duration of symptoms before the operation; patients with lower classes of myasthenia showed a higher rate of remission. Conclusions: Thymectomy is effective in the management of patients with MG at all stages with low morbidity. Patients with thymoma present a less favorable outcome.
    European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery - EUR J CARDIO-THORAC SURG. 01/1999; 15(5):621-625.
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    ABSTRACT: Lung volume reduction has been performed in patients with advanced emphysema to relieve dyspnea and improve exercise tolerance. Median sternotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopy have been proposed as equally adequate approaches; however, prolonged postoperative air leakage is the most prevalent complication in all series. For this reason, on the basis of the experience achieved with the median sternotomy approach, buttressing of the suture line with different materials and techniques for space reduction have been proposed. We describe a technique to create a pleural tent after thoracoscopic volume reduction. The thoracoscopic creation of a pleural tent is feasible and results in a duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stays similar to that achieved with stapler line buttressing.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 12/1998; 66(5):1833-4. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been recently used as pulmonary vasodilator without any systemic effects because of a rapid inactivation by haemoglobin. We studied haemodynamic and oxygenation effects during iNO administration in cystic fibrotic patients during preoperative evaluation and during anaesthesia for lung transplantation. From March 1996 to November 1997, 35 patients received iNO (40 ppm) during preoperative evaluation in spontaneously breathing. 13 patients, who underwent double lung transplantation, received iNO (40 ppm) during the surgical procedures, after pulmonary artery clamping. In the preoperative evaluation a significant decrease of mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance index and intrapulmonary shunt, with an increase of PaO2/FiO2, were observed during iNO administration, compared to baseline in 100% O2. During lung transplantation a significant decrease in intrapulmonary shunt was noted. All the transplants were successfully performed without cardio-pulmonary bypass. In all procedures, after iNO administration, we observed no modification of systemic haemodynamics. In conclusion, our study confirms the pulmonary effects of iNO without any systemic effects in patients affected by cystic fibrosis during preoperative evaluation and during anaesthesia for lung transplantation.
    European Journal of Pediatric Surgery 11/1998; 8(5):262-7. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bilateral lung transplantation is actually considered a valuable option for patients with endstage lung disease related to cystic fibrosis. Timing is crucial to transplant successfully as many patients as possible and it is mainly based on the progressive worsening of pulmonary function tests and quality of life. We reviewed the charts of all patients accepted for lung transplantation at our institution, in order to assess the role of several functional and demographic parameters; we compared the group of patients able to successfully wait for transplantation (Group A) with patients dying on the waiting list (Group B). Twenty-eight patients were accepted: 15 were successfully transplanted (2 at other institutions) (mean waiting time: 117 days), 7 died waiting (mean waiting time: 108 days) and 6 are still on the list. We recorded FEV-1, FVC, PaO2, PaCO2, supplemental O2 requirement, 6-minute walking test, right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and cardio-pulmonary hemodynamics measured at right heart catheterization; we recorded also age at time of diagnosis and at time of evaluation, sex, weight and Schwachman score. These parameters were compared between Group A and B. Age at time of evaluation, sex, weight and Schwachman score did not present any difference between the two groups, as well as pulmonary function tests, PaO2, 6-minute walk test and RVEF. A statistically significant difference was found in terms of PaCO2 (43.9 +/- 9.3 in Group A vs 69.1 +/- 32.4 in Group B, heart rate at rest (102 +/- 21 vs 131 +/- 12) mean pulmonary artery pressure (20.6 +/- 2.9 vs 36 +/- 15.7), pulmonary vascular resistances (350 +/- 96 vs 460 +/- 119.4), cardiac index (3.2 +/- 0.6 vs 5.4 +/- 0.9). On the base of our initial experience we conclude that a careful evaluation of CF candidates for lung transplantation is recommended. A deterioration of pulmonary function tests and quality of life are useful parameters to accept patients in the waiting list; however priority should be attributed also on the base of cardio-pulmonary hemodynamics. A larger series of patients is required to draw definitive conclusions.
    European Journal of Pediatric Surgery 11/1998; 8(5):274-7. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Between November 1996 and November 1997 we have transplanted 13 patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Bilateral Sequential Lung Transplantation (BSLT) was successfully performed in all patients; one patient died from pneumonia and sepsis in the postoperative period and 12 are alive and well after a follow-up ranging between 1 and 13 months. Blood gas analysis improved from mean values of PaO2: 56 mm/Hg (with oxygen) and PaCO2: 43 mm/Hg to mean values of PaO2: 85 mm/Hg and PaCO2: 37 mm/Hg. Pulmonary function tests also improved dramatically: FEV1 improved from 20% predicted to 98% predicted. FVC also improved from 39% to 100%. The quality of life markedly improved: the ideal body weight moved from about 84% to normal values within nine months, and the 6-minute walk-test improved after transplantation from a preoperative distance of 325 meters, to 600 meters after 6 months. In conclusion, our favorable experience with BSLT in CF patients emphasizes the importance of lung transplantation in these patients. Carefully selected and properly managed patients may benefit from transplantation in terms of quality and duration of life.
    European Journal of Pediatric Surgery 09/1998; 8(4):208-11. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Between April 1993 and April 1996, 146 endoscopic procedures were performed in 128 patients (144 with Nd:YAG laser) with benign or malignant obstructions of the airway. Removal of foreign bodies are not included in this series. Twenty resections were performed with the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope under local anesthesia and 126 with the rigid tube under general anesthesia. Power settings were always between 20 and 35 Watts. Eighteen procedures were performed in emergency. Fifteen patients had a benign postintubation tracheal stricture (20 treatments-11 Dumon stents and 1 Montgomery tube). Eighty-two patients (90 treatments-12 stents) had malignant lesions of the airways (trachea 11, carina 2, RMB 22, LMB 27, TI 11, LULB 3, RULB 2, LILB 4). Laryngeal, tracheal or bronchial granulations were present in 19 patients (21 treatments). Other lesions were present in 11 patients (14 treatments-6 stents). Major complications occurring during laser resections were bleeding (2), hypoxia (1) and cardiac arrhythmia (2); 2 patients died 24 hours after the procedure for cardio-respiratory failure. The airway calibre was improved in 100% of patients with benign lesions and 82.4% of patients with malignancy. In the latter group the trachea, main stem bronchi and truncus intermedius calibre was improved better than the lobar bronchi. All patients with malignancy underwent chemo-radiotherapy without respiratory distress. Nd:YAG laser therapy is a safe and effective mean of releasing airway obstructions; indwelling stents contribute to further improve the results.
    Minerva chirurgica 07/1998; 53(6):483-8. · 0.39 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation Proceedings 07/1998; 30(4):1521-2. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been used as pulmonary vasodilator without any effect on systemic hemodynamics. iNO has been also used in cardiac and thoracic surgery, involving lung transplantation. In this case report a patient, 41 years old female, affected by bronchiectasis, underwent bilateral sequential single lung transplantation and during one lung ventilation and pulmonary artery clamped iNO allowed to avoid cardiopulmonary bypass and to carry out the procedure successfully.
    Minerva anestesiologica 07/1998; 64(6):297-301. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients undergoing pulmonary resections often present postoperative air leaks of varying magnitude and duration; this complication is more frequent with incomplete or absent interlobar fissures. Small leaks close spontaneously within 5-7 days; larger leaks may persist longer and could be associated with increased morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. We evaluated the role of different techniques to complete interlobar fissures before pulmonary lobectomy to prevent postoperative air leaks and reduce hospital stay and costs. A total of 30 patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy for lung cancer and presenting incomplete interlobar fissures that needed to be opened both anteriorly and posteriorly were randomized into three groups. In Group I, fissures were created with a GIA stapler and buttressed with bovine pericardial sleeves. In Group II, we used TA 55 staplers alone; in Group III we used the 'old fashion' cautery, clamps and silk ties. The three groups were homogeneous for age, type of pulmonary resection and stage of the tumor. The duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stay were compared with the one-way variance analysis. Postoperative air leaks for Groups I, II and III persisted for 2 +/- 0.94, 5.3 +/- 2 and 5.3 +/- 1.7 days, respectively. Mean hospital stay was 4.4 +/- 0.96, 7.8 +/- 2.14 and 7.2 +/- 1.5, respectively. The difference between groups in terms of duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stay was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). The use of GIA staplers and pericardial sleeves to complete interlobar fissures for pulmonary lobectomy significantly reduces the duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stay; no complications were associated with this technique.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 05/1998; 13(4):361-4. · 2.67 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 02/1998; 157(1):292-3. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    Transplantation Proceedings 01/1998; 29(8):3367-70. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Patients undergoing pulmonary resections often present postoperative air leaks of varying magnitude and duration; this complication is more frequent with incomplete or absent interlobar fissures. Small leaks close spontaneously within 5–7 days; larger leaks may persist longer and could be associated with increased morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. We evaluated the role of different techniques to complete interlobar fissures before pulmonary lobectomy to prevent postoperative air leaks and reduce hospital stay and costs. Methods: A total of 30 patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy for lung cancer and presenting incomplete interlobar fissures that needed to be opened both anteriorly and posteriorly were randomized into three groups. In Group I, fissures were created with a GIA stapler and buttressed with bovine pericardial sleeves. In Group II, we used TA 55 staplers alone; in Group III we used the ‘old fashion’ cautery, clamps and silk ties. The three groups were homogeneous for age, type of pulmonary resection and stage of the tumor. The duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stay were compared with the one-way variance analysis. Results: Postoperative air leaks for Groups I, II and III persisted for 2±0.94, 5.3±2 and 5.3±1.7 days, respectively. Mean hospital stay was 4.4±0.96, 7.8±2.14 and 7.2±1.5, respectively. The difference between groups in terms of duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stay was statistically significant (P=0.0001). Conclusions: The use of GIA staplers and pericardial sleeves to complete interlobar fissures for pulmonary lobectomy significantly reduces the duration of postoperative air leaks and hospital stay; no complications were associated with this technique.
    European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery - EUR J CARDIO-THORAC SURG. 01/1998; 13(4):361-364.
  • Transplantation Proceedings 01/1998; 29(8):3362-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thymomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Treatment of invasive lesions is not well standardized. The aim of this study is to propose a clinicopathologically based protocol for multimodality therapy. Between 1965 and 1988, we operated on 83 patients with thymoma who did not receive standardized adjuvant therapy. In 1989, on the basis of the retrospective analysis of the data, we started a multimodality therapy protocol and used it for 65 patients. Twelve patients had medullary thymoma (11 stage I and 1 stage II), 13 had mixed type (6 stage I and 7 stage II), and 40 had cortical thymoma (4 stage I, 11 stage II, 12 stage III, and 13 stage IV). We considered three groups. Group I (n = 18 patients), benign thymoma, included stage I and II medullary and stage I mixed thymomas; radical resection with no adjuvant therapy was performed. Group II (n = 22), invasive thymoma, included stage I and II cortical and stage II mixed thymomas; postoperative chemotherapy plus radiotherapy was always administered. Group III (n = 25), malignant thymoma, comprised stage III and IV cortical thymomas and stage III mixed thymomas; resectable stage III lesions were removed, and highly invasive stage III and stage IV lesions underwent biopsy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and surgical resection; postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy was administered to all patients. The 8-year survival rate for patients in stages I, II, III, and IV was 95%, 100%, 92%, and 68%, respectively. Patients with medullary thymoma had a 92% 8-year survival rate; those with mixed type, 100%; and those with cortical thymoma, 85%. Group I had an 8-year survival rate of 94%; group II, 100%; and group III, 76%. Survival was compared with that of patients operated on before 1989: differences were not significant for group I; survival improved in group II (100% versus 81%; p = not significant); and group III showed significant improvement (76% versus 43%; p < 0.049). Multimodality treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy may improve the results of radical resection and the survival of patients with invasive and malignant thymoma.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 12/1997; 64(6):1585-91; discussion 1591-2. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bronchoscopy and imaging techniques are the most valuable tools for noninvasive staging of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer but their overall accuracy is not satisfactory. Neoadjuvant therapy protocols require strict criteria for patient selection and invasive staging should be carried out to establish standardized inclusion criteria and to homogenize posttreatment results. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of thoracoscopy in the assessment of the real extent of lung cancer in patients with the clinical suspicion of stage IIIB disease. From January 1993 to March 1996, we observed 64 patients with suspected IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Forty-three patients were considered eligible for this study and were divided into three groups: group I, cytologically negative pleural effusion (n = 10); group II, computed tomographic suspicion of mediastinal infiltration (n = 30); and group III, contralateral lymphadenopathy not accessible by mediastinoscopy (n = 3). No complications related to thoracoscopy occurred. Of 10 patients in group I, thoracoscopy up-staged the disease to IIIB in 6 (60%). Of 30 patients with suspicion of T4 (group II), thoracoscopy confirmed T4 in 15 patients (50%). Nine (30%) were downstaged to stage IIIA and 2 (6.6%) to stage II. In 4 patients (13.4%) thoracoscopy failed to yield definitive staging. In all 3 patients of group III, thoracoscopy confirmed stage IIIB. Thoracoscopy proved adequate for correct staging in 39 of 43 patients (91%); therefore, it should be considered in the staging work-up of suspected stage IIIB patients.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 12/1997; 64(5):1409-11. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to ascertain the safety and efficacy of bronchial sleeve resection and reconstruction of the pulmonary artery in patients who had undergone induction chemotherapy for lung cancer. Between January 1991 and July 1996, we operated on 68 patients who had received three cycles of cisplatin-based induction chemotherapy. In 27 of these cases, we performed a lobectomy (n = 25) or bilobectomy (n = 2) associated with reconstruction of the bronchus, the pulmonary artery, or both. In only five additional patients, pneumonectomy had to be carried out. Before chemotherapy, 14 patients were in stage IIIA and 13 were in stage IIIB. All patients in stage IIIB had T4 disease; no N3 cases were included. At thoracotomy, one patient had no evidence of tumor, six were in stage I, 13 were in stage II, six were in stage IIIA, and one was in stage IIIB. Sixteen patients had epidermoid carcinoma and 11 had adenocarcinoma. Sixteen patients underwent bronchial sleeve resection; 11 had various types of pulmonary artery reconstruction, associated with the bronchial sleeve in eight cases. In 26 patients, resection was radical with histologically negative margins. Neither bronchial complications nor deaths occurred. One patient had empyema and two had wound infections. Mean chest tube duration was 6 days. After a postoperative follow-up of 4 to 69 months (mean 25 months), 14 patients are alive and free of disease, one is alive with disease, and 12 have died. There were no local recurrences. The 1- and 4-year survival rates are 78% and 39%, respectively. Although it is technically demanding, lobectomy associated with bronchovascular reconstruction is feasible, with good immediate and long-term results, after induction chemotherapy.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 12/1997; 114(5):830-5; discussion 835-7. · 3.53 Impact Factor