Yan Zhang

Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China

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Publications (47)276.83 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Selenium (Se) and sulfur (S) are closely related elements that exhibit similar chemical properties. Some genes related to S metabolism are also involved in Se utilization in many organisms. However, the evolutionary relationship between the two utilization traits is unclear.
    BMC genomics. 10/2014; 15(1):908.
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    ABSTRACT: Trace elements are essential for human metabolism and dysregulation of their homoeostasis is associated with numerous disorders. Here we characterize mechanisms that regulate trace elements in human cells by designing and performing a genome-wide high-throughput siRNA/ionomics screen, and examining top hits in cellular and biochemical assays. The screen reveals high stability of the ionomes, especially the zinc ionome, and yields known regulators and novel candidates. We further uncover fundamental differences in the regulation of different trace elements. Specifically, selenium levels are controlled through the selenocysteine machinery and expression of abundant selenoproteins; copper balance is affected by lipid metabolism and requires machinery involved in protein trafficking and post-translational modifications; and the iron levels are influenced by iron import and expression of the iron/haeme-containing enzymes. Our approach can be applied to a variety of disease models and/or nutritional conditions, and the generated data set opens new directions for studies of human trace element metabolism.
    Nature Communications 02/2014; 5:3301. · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human longevity is always a biological hotspot and so much effort has been devoted to identifying genes and genetic variations associated with longer lives. Most of the demographic studies have highlighted that females have a longer life span than males. The reasons for this are not entirely clear. In this study, we carried out a pool-based, epigenome-wide investigation of DNA methylation profiles in male and female nonagenarians/centenarians using the Illumina 450 K Methylation Beadchip assays. Although no significant difference was detected for the average methylation levels of examined CpGs (or probes) between male and female samples, a significant number of differentially methylated probes (DMPs) were identified, which appeared to be enriched in certain chromosome regions and certain parts of genes. Further analysis of DMP-containing genes (named DMGs) revealed that almost all of them are solely hypermethylated or hypomethylated. Functional enrichment analysis of these DMGs indicated that DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation may regulate genes involved in different biological processes, such as hormone regulation, neuron projection, and disease-related pathways. This is the first effort to explore the gender-based methylome difference in nonagenarians/centenarians, which may provide new insights into the complex mechanism of longevity gender gap of human beings.
    BioMed research international. 01/2014; 2014:396727.
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    ABSTRACT: Background The naked mole rats (NMRs) are small-sized underground rodents with plenty of unusual traits. Their life expectancy can be up to thirty years, more than seven times longer than laboratory rat. Furthermore, they are resistant to both congenital and experimentally induced cancer genesis. These peculiar physiological and pathological characteristics allow them to become a suitable model for cancer and aging research. Results In this paper, we carried out a genome-wide comparative analysis of rat and NMR using the recently published genome sequence of NMR. First, we identified all the rat-NMR orthologous genes and specific genes within each of them. The expanded and contracted numbers of protein families in NMR were also analyzed when compared to rat. Seven cancer-related protein families appeared to be significantly expanded, whereas several receptor families were found to be contracted in NMR. We then chose those rat genes that were inexistent in NMR and adopted KEGG pathway database to investigate the metabolic processes in which their proteins may be involved. These genes were significantly enriched in two rat cancer pathways, "Pathway in cancer" and "Bladder cancer". In the rat "Pathway in cancer", 9 out of 14 paths leading to evading apoptosis appeared to be affected in NMR. In addition, a significant number of other NMR-missing genes enriched in several cancer-related pathways have been known to be related to a variety of cancers, implying that many of them may be also related to tumorigenesis in mammals. Finally, investigation of sequence variations among orthologous proteins between rat and NMR revealed that significant fragment insertions/deletions within important functional domains were present in some NMR proteins, which might lead to expressional and/or functional changes of these genes in different species. Conclusions Overall, this study provides insights into understanding the possible anti-cancer mechanisms of NMR as well as searching for new cancer-related candidate genes.
    BMC Systems Biology 10/2013; 7(2). · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The trace element selenium (Se) is required for the biosynthesis of selenocysteine (Sec), the 21st amino acid in the genetic code, but its role in the ecology of harmful algal blooms (HABs) is unknown. Here, we examined the role of Se in the biology and ecology of the harmful pelagophyte, Aureococcus anophagefferens, through cell culture, genomic analyses, and ecosystem studies. This organism has the largest and the most diverse selenoproteome identified to date that consists of at least 59 selenoproteins, including known eukaryotic selenoproteins, selenoproteins previously only detected in bacteria, and novel selenoproteins. The A. anophagefferens selenoproteome was dominated by the thioredoxin fold proteins and oxidoreductase functions were assigned to the majority of detected selenoproteins. Insertion of Sec in these proteins was supported by a unique Sec insertion sequence. Se was required for the growth of A. anophagefferens as cultures grew maximally at nanomolar Se concentrations. In a coastal ecosystem, dissolved Se concentrations were elevated before and after A. anophagefferens blooms, but were reduced by >95% during the peak of blooms to 0.05 nM. Consistent with this pattern, enrichment of seawater with selenite before and after a bloom did not affect the growth of A. anophagefferens, but enrichment during the peak of the bloom significantly increased population growth rates. These findings demonstrate that Se inventories, which can be anthropogenically enriched, can support proliferation of HABs, such as A. anophagefferens through its synthesis of a large arsenal of Se-dependent oxidoreductases that fine-tune cellular redox homeostasis.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 7 March 2013; doi:10.1038/ismej.2013.25.
    The ISME Journal 03/2013; · 8.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Each phase of eukaryotic cell cycle is tightly controlled by multi-component regulatory networks based on complex relationships of protein phosphorylation. In order to better understand the relationships between kinases and their substrate proteins during the progress of cell cycle, we analyzed phosphoproteome of HeLa cells during G1, S and G2/M phases of cell cycle using our developed quantitative phosphoproteomic approaches. A total of 4,776 high-confidence phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) in 1,177 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis for predicting kinase groups revealed that 46 kinase groups could be assigned to 4,321 phosphosites. The majority of phosphoproteins harboring two or more phosphosites could be phosphorylated by different kinase groups, in which nine major kinase groups accounted for more than 90% phosphosites. Further analyses showed that approximately half of the examined two-phosphosite combinations were correlatively regulated, regardless of whether the kinase groups were same or not. In general, the majority of proteins containing correlated phosphosites had solely co-regulated or counter-regulated phosphosites, and co-regulation was significantly more frequent than counter-regulation, suggesting that the former may be more important for regulating the cell cycle. In conclusion, our findings provide new insights into the complex regulatory mechanisms of protein phosphorylation networks during eukaryotic cell cycle.
    Proteomics 01/2013; · 4.43 Impact Factor
  • Vadim N Gladyshev, Yan Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: Biological trace metals are needed in small quantities, but used by all living organisms. They are employed in key cellular functions in a variety of biological processes, resulting in the various degree of dependence of organisms on metals. Most effort in the field has been placed on experimental studies of metal utilization pathways and metal-dependent proteins. On the other hand, systemic level analyses of metalloproteomes (or metallomes) have been limited for most metals. In this chapter, we focus on the recent advances in comparative genomics, which provides many insights into evolution and function of metal utilization. These studies suggested that iron and zinc are widely used in biology (presumably by all organisms), whereas some other metals such as copper, molybdenum, nickel, and cobalt, show scattered occurrence in various groups of organisms. For these metals, most user proteins are well characterized and their dependence on a specific element is evolutionarily conserved. We also discuss evolutionary dynamics of the dependence of user proteins on different metals. Overall, comparative genomics analysis of metallomes provides a foundation for the systemic level understanding of metal utilization as well as for investigating the general features, functions, and evolutionary dynamics of metal use in the three domains of life.
    Metal ions in life sciences. 01/2013; 12:529-80.
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    ABSTRACT: Background. The selenocysteine(Sec)-containing proteins, selenoproteins, are an important group of proteins present in all three kingdoms of life. Although the selenoproteomes of many organisms have been analyzed, systematic studies on selenoproteins in platyhelminthes are still lacking. Moreover, comparison of selenoproteomes between free-living and parasitic animals is rarely studied. Results. In this study, three representative organisms (Schmidtea mediterranea, Schistosoma japonicum and Taenia solium) were selected for comparative analysis of selenoproteomes in Platyhelminthes. Using a SelGenAmic-based selenoprotein prediction algorithm, a total of 37 selenoprotein genes were identified in these organisms. The size of selenoproteomes and selenoprotein families were found to be associated with different lifestyles: free-living organisms have larger selenoproteome whereas parasitic lifestyle corresponds to reduced selenoproteomes. Five selenoproteins, SelT, Sel15, GPx, SPS2 and TR, were found to be present in all examined platyhelminthes as well as almost all sequenced animals, suggesting their essential role in metazoans. Finally, a new splicing form of SelW that lacked the first exon was found to be present in S. japonicum. Conclusions. Our data provide a first glance into the selenoproteomes of organisms in the phylum Platyhelminthes and may help understand function and evolutionary dynamics of selenium utilization in diversified metazoans.
    PeerJ. 01/2013; 1:e202.
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    ABSTRACT: Trace elements have been recognized to play an important role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is difficult to precisely identify the relationship between these elements and the progression of PD because of an insufficient number of patients. In this study, quantifications of selenium (Se), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry were performed in plasma from 238 PD patients and 302 controls recruited from eastern China, which is so far the largest cohort of PD patients and controls for measuring plasma levels of these elements. We found that plasma Se and Fe concentrations were significantly increased whereas Cu and Zn concentrations decreased in PD patients as compared with controls. Meanwhile, these four elements displayed differential changes with regard to age. Linear and logistic regression analyses revealed that both Fe and Zn were negatively correlated with age in PD patients. Association analysis suggests that lower plasma Se and Fe levels may reduce the risk for PD, whereas lower plasma Zn is probably a PD risk factor. Finally, a model was generated to predict PD patients based on the plasma concentrations of these four trace elements as well as other features such as sex and age, which achieved an accuracy of 80.97±1.34% using 10-fold cross-validation. In summary, our data provide new insights into the roles of Se, Cu, Fe and Zn in PD progression.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(12):e83060. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Methionine (Met) residues in proteins can be readily oxidized by reactive oxygen species to Met sulfoxide (MetO). MetO is a promising physiological marker of oxidative stress and its inefficient repair by MetO reductases (Msrs) has been linked to neurodegeneration and aging. Conventional methods of assaying MetO formation and reduction rely on chromatographic or mass spectrometry procedures, but the use of Met-rich proteins (MRPs) may offer a more streamlined alternative. RESULTS: We carried out a computational search of completely sequenced genomes for MRPs deficient in cysteine (Cys) residues and identified several proteins containing 20% or more Met residues. We used these MRPs to examine Met oxidation and MetO reduction by in-gel shift assays and immunoblot assays with antibodies generated against various oxidized MRPs. The oxidation of Cys-free MRPs by hydrogen peroxide could be conveniently monitored by SDS-PAGE and was specific for Met, as evidenced by quantitative reduction of these proteins with Msrs in DTT- and thioredoxin-dependent assays. We found that hypochlorite was especially efficient in oxidizing MRPs. Finally, we further developed a procedure wherein antibodies made against oxidized MRPs were isolated on affinity resins containing same or other oxidized or reduced MRPs. This procedure yielded reagents specific for MetO in these proteins, but proved to be ineffective in developing antibodies with broad MetO specificity. CONCLUSION: Our data show that MRPs provide a convenient tool for characterization of Met oxidation, MetO reduction and Msr activities, and could be used for various aspects of redox biology involving reversible Met oxidation.
    BMC Biochemistry 10/2012; 13(1):21. · 1.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many methods have been developed to identify disease genes and further module biomarkers of complex diseases based on gene expression data. It is generally difficult to distinguish whether the variations in gene expression are causative or merely the effect of a disease. The limitation of relying on gene expression data alone highlights the need to develop new approaches that can explore various data to reflect the casual relationship between network modules and disease traits. METHODS: In this work, we developed a novel network-based approach to identify putative causal module biomarkers of complex diseases by integrating heterogeneous information, for example, epigenomic data, gene expression data, and protein-protein interaction network. We first formulated the identification of modules as a mathematical programming problem, which can be solved efficiently and effectively in an accurate manner. Then, we applied our approach to colorectal cancer (CRC) and identified several network modules that can serve as potential module biomarkers for characterizing CRC. Further validations using three additional gene expression datasets verified their candidate biomarker properties and the effectiveness of the method. Functional enrichment analysis also revealed that the identified modules are strongly related to hallmarks of cancer, and the enriched functions, such as inflammatory response, receptor and signaling pathways, are specific to CRC. RESULTS: Through constructing a transcription factor (TF)-module network, we found that aberrant DNA methylation of genes encoding TF considerably contributes to the activity change of some genes, which may function as causal genes of CRC, and that can also be exploited to develop efficient therapies or effective drugs. CONCLUSION: Our method can potentially be extended to the study of other complex diseases and the multiclassification problem.
    Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 09/2012; · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    Yan Zhang, Jie Lin, Yang Gao
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    ABSTRACT: Homologous recombination is a fundamental cellular process that is most widely used by cells to rearrange genes and accurately repair DNA double-strand breaks. It may result in the formation of a critical intermediate named Holliday junction, which is a four-way DNA junction and needs to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Different Holliday junction resolution systems and enzymes have been characterized from all three domains of life. In bacteria, the RuvABC complex is the most important resolution system. In this study, we conducted comparative genomics studies to identify a novel DNA-binding protein, YebC, which may serve as a key transcriptional regulator that mainly regulates the gene expression of RuvABC resolvasome in bacteria. On the other hand, the presence of YebC orthologs in some organisms lacking RuvC implied that it might participate in other biological processes. Further phylogenetic analysis of YebC protein sequences revealed two functionally different subtypes: YebC_I and YebC_II. Distribution of YebC_I is much wider than YebC_II. Only YebC_I proteins may play an important role in regulating RuvABC gene expression in bacteria. Investigation of YebC-like proteins in eukaryotes suggested that they may have originated from YebC_II proteins and evolved a new function as a specific translational activator in mitochondria. Finally, additional phylum-specific genes associated with Holliday junction resolution were predicted. Overall, our data provide new insights into the basic mechanism of Holliday junction resolution and homologous recombination in bacteria.
    BMC Systems Biology 07/2012; 6 Suppl 1:S20. · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer is one of the most important public health problems in developed countries. To date, a systematic understanding of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer is still lacking. In this work, we identified differentially expressed protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) between normal and cancer tissues based on a recent RNA-seq study from Caucasian population. We then investigated the relationship between differentially expressed genes and lncRNAs. Furthermore, based on a recently published prostate cancer study on Chinese population, we identified differentially expressed genes between Caucasian and Chinese populations to investigate racial difference. Moreover, for the first time, we compared the correlation of lncRNA-gene across populations. In the end, a lot of differentially expressed genes and lncRNAs were identified. Our results revealed that most of the lncRNA-gene pairs were positively correlated especially for the lncRNA-host gene pairs, indicating the probable mechanism of lncRNA. And 320 genes were differentially expressed in prostate cancer across populations, which may help us to investigate the ethnic differences of prostate cancer. In addition, our results suggested that lncRNAs regulate genes in different manners across populations. Our findings may help understand molecular events underlying prostate cancer development.
    Systems Biology (ISB), 2012 IEEE 6th International Conference on; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Selenium is an essential trace element in mammals due to its presence in proteins in the form of selenocysteine (Sec). Human genome codes for 25 Sec-containing protein genes, and mouse and rat genomes for 24. We characterized the selenoproteomes of 44 sequenced vertebrates by applying gene prediction and phylogenetic reconstruction methods, supplemented with the analyses of gene structures, alternative splicing isoforms, untranslated regions, SECIS elements, and pseudogenes. In total, we detected 45 selenoprotein subfamilies. 28 of them were found in mammals, and 41 in bony fishes. We define the ancestral vertebrate (28 proteins) and mammalian (25 proteins) selenoproteomes, and describe how they evolved along lineages through gene duplication (20 events), gene loss (10 events) and replacement of Sec with cysteine (12 events). We show that an intronless selenophosphate synthetase 2 gene evolved in early mammals and replaced functionally the original multiexon gene in placental mammals, whereas both genes remain in marsupials. Mammalian thioredoxin reductase 1 and thioredoxin-glutathione reductase evolved from an ancestral glutaredoxin-domain containing enzyme, still present in fish. Selenoprotein V and GPx6 evolved specifically in placental mammals from duplications of SelW and GPx3, respectively, and GPx6 lost Sec several times independently. Bony fishes were characterized by duplications of several selenoprotein families (GPx1, GPx3, GPx4, Dio3, MsrB1, SelJ, SelO, SelT, SelU1, and SelW2). Finally, we report identification of new isoforms for several selenoproteins and describe unusually conserved selenoprotein pseudogenes. This analysis represents the first comprehensive survey of the vertebrate and mammal selenoproteomes, and depicts their evolution along lineages. It also provides a wealth of information on these selenoproteins and their forms.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(3):e33066. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The naked mole rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived underground mammal, whose maximum lifespan can be up to 30 years and more than 7 times longer than house mouse. In addition, they are resistant to both spontaneous and experimentally induced tumorigenesis. These special biologic or behavioral characteristics make them most suitable for cancer and longevity research. The recent genome sequencing of NMR has provided the opportunity for the study of molecular mechanisms of such extreme traits. In this study, we carried out a comparative analysis of the complete set of NMR and rat genes. First, we identified all orthologous genes shared between these two animals. We further focused on the rat genes that were absent in NMR and used KEGG pathway database to identify the biological meaning of their proteins. The top three pathways include “Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction”, “Neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction” and “Pathways in cancer”, which was consistent with the unique NMR traits. Interestingly, in the rat cancer pathway which contains 13 paths leading to evading apoptosis, 8 of them appeared to be interrupted in NMR. Finally, we found that 50% of genes lacked in “Pathways in cancer” and 40% of genes lacked in “MAPK signaling pathway” have been known to be related to a variety of cancers. Overall, this study provides insights into searching for new cancer-related genes and understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of NMR.
    Systems Biology (ISB), 2012 IEEE 6th International Conference on; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Selenoprotein K (SelK) is an 11-kDa endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein of unknown function. Herein, we defined a new eukaryotic protein family that includes SelK, selenoprotein S (SelS), and distantly related proteins. Comparative genomics analyses indicate that this family is the most widespread eukaryotic selenoprotein family. A biochemical search for proteins that interact with SelK revealed ER-associated degradation (ERAD) components (p97 ATPase, Derlins, and SelS). In this complex, SelK showed higher affinity for Derlin-1, whereas SelS had higher affinity for Derlin-2, suggesting that these selenoproteins could determine the nature of the substrate translocated through the Derlin channel. SelK co-precipitated with soluble glycosylated ERAD substrates and was involved in their degradation. Its gene contained a functional ER stress response element, and its expression was up-regulated by conditions that induce the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER. Components of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex (ribophorins, OST48, and STT3A) and an ER chaperone, calnexin, were found to bind SelK. A glycosylated form of SelK was also detected, reflecting its association with the oligosaccharyltransferase complex. These data suggest that SelK is involved in the Derlin-dependent ERAD of glycosylated misfolded proteins and that the function defined by the prototypic SelK is the widespread function of selenium in eukaryotes.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2011; 286(50):42937-48. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 2-Cysteine (Cys) peroxiredoxins (Prxs), which include mammalian Prxs I–IV, possess two conserved Cys residues that are readily oxidized by H2O2 to form a disulfide. In the case of Prx I–III, the disulfide is reduced by thioredoxin, thus enabling these proteins to function as peroxidases. Prx IV was shown previously to be synthesized as a 31-kDa polypeptide with an NH2-terminal signal peptide that is subsequently cleaved to generate a 27-kDa form of the protein that is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. A form of Prx IV, larger than 27 kDa revealed by immunoblot analysis was suggested to represent the unprocessed, 31-kDa form, but this larger form was detected only in spermatids of the postpubertal testis. We now show that the larger form of Prx IV (here designated Prx IV-L) detected in the testis is actually a product of alternative transcription of the Prx IV gene that is encoded by newly identified exon 1A together with exons 2–7 that are shared with the 27-kDa form (designated Prx IV-S). Prx IV-L was detected in spermatids but not in mature sperm, it could form disulfide-linked dimers but not higher order oligomers via oxidation, and it was resistant to hyperoxidation unless additional reductant was added, suggesting that its peroxidase activity is limited in vivo. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Prx IV-S gene is present in all vertebrates examined, whereas the Prx IV-L gene was detected only in placental mammals. We suggest that Prx IV-L functions as an H2O2 sensor that mediates protein thiol oxidation required for the maturation of spermatozoa in placental mammals.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 11/2011; 286(45):39002-39012. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    Yang Gao, Yan Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: Homologous recombination is a fundamental cellular process that is most widely used by cells to rearrange genes and accurately repair DNA double-strand breaks. It may result in the formation of a critical intermediate named Holliday junction, which is a four-way DNA junction and needs to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Different Holliday junction resolution systems and enzymes have been characterized from all three domains of life. In bacteria, the RuvABC complex is the most important resolution system. In this study, we conducted comparative genomics studies to identify a novel DNA-binding protein, YebC, which may serve as a key regulator of RuvABC resolvasome. On the other hand, the presence of YebC orthologs in some organisms lacking RuvC implied that it might participate in other biological processes. Further phylogenetic analysis of YebC protein sequences revealed two functionally different subtypes of this family: YebC_I and YebC_II. Only YebC_I subgroup may play an important role in regulating RuvABC gene expression in bacteria. Investigation of YebC-like proteins in eukaryotes suggested that they may have originated from YebC_II proteins and evolved a new function as a specific translational activator in mitochondria. Finally, additional phylum-specific genes associated with Holliday junction resolution were predicted. Overall, this study provides new insight into the basic mechanism of Holliday junction resolution and homologous recombination in bacteria.
    Systems Biology (ISB), 2011 IEEE International Conference on; 10/2011
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    ABSTRACT: 2-Cysteine (Cys) peroxiredoxins (Prxs), which include mammalian Prxs I-IV, possess two conserved Cys residues that are readily oxidized by H(2)O(2) to form a disulfide. In the case of Prx I-III, the disulfide is reduced by thioredoxin, thus enabling these proteins to function as peroxidases. Prx IV was shown previously to be synthesized as a 31-kDa polypeptide with an NH(2)-terminal signal peptide that is subsequently cleaved to generate a 27-kDa form of the protein that is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. A form of Prx IV, larger than 27 kDa revealed by immunoblot analysis was suggested to represent the unprocessed, 31-kDa form, but this larger form was detected only in spermatids of the postpubertal testis. We now show that the larger form of Prx IV (here designated Prx IV-L) detected in the testis is actually a product of alternative transcription of the Prx IV gene that is encoded by newly identified exon 1A together with exons 2-7 that are shared with the 27-kDa form (designated Prx IV-S). Prx IV-L was detected in spermatids but not in mature sperm, it could form disulfide-linked dimers but not higher order oligomers via oxidation, and it was resistant to hyperoxidation unless additional reductant was added, suggesting that its peroxidase activity is limited in vivo. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Prx IV-S gene is present in all vertebrates examined, whereas the Prx IV-L gene was detected only in placental mammals. We suggest that Prx IV-L functions as an H(2)O(2) sensor that mediates protein thiol oxidation required for the maturation of spermatozoa in placental mammals.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 08/2011; 286(45):39002-12. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Yan Zhang, Vadim N Gladyshev
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    ABSTRACT: Biological trace elements are needed in small quantities but are used by all living organisms. A growing list of trace element-dependent proteins and trace element utilization pathways highlights the importance of these elements for life. In this minireview, we focus on recent advances in comparative genomics of trace elements and explore the evolutionary dynamics of the dependence of user proteins on these elements. Many zinc protein families evolved representatives that lack this metal, whereas selenocysteine in proteins is dynamically exchanged with cysteine. Several other elements, such as molybdenum and nickel, have a limited number of user protein families, but they are strictly dependent on these metals. Comparative genomics of trace elements provides a foundation for investigating the fundamental properties, functions, and evolutionary dynamics of trace element dependence in biology.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/2011; 286(27):23623-9. · 4.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

968 Citations
276.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2014
    • Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China
    • Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology
      • Key Laboratory of Synthetic Biology
      Beijing, Beijing Shi, China
    • Chinese Academy of Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2013
    • Stony Brook University
      • School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
      Stony Brook, New York, United States
  • 2010–2013
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009–2013
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2011
    • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      • Division of Genetics
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2005–2009
    • University of Nebraska at Lincoln
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Lincoln, NE, United States
  • 2008
    • Yeungnam University
      • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      Daikyū, Daegu, South Korea