Michael Kiess

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany

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Publications (27)100.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 100 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract of an article which was published elsewhere, please select a “Full Text” option. The original article is trackable via the “References” option.
    ChemInform 12/2010; 28(49). DOI:10.1002/chin.199749322
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    ABSTRACT: The cell wall of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exclusively consists of hydroxyproline-containing glycoproteins. Protein chemical analysis of its polypeptide constituents was hindered by their cross-linking via peroxidase-catalysed intermolecular isodityrosine formation and transaminase-dependent processes. To overcome this problem, we have identified putative soluble precursors using polyclonal antibodies raised against deglycosylation products of the highly purified insoluble wall fraction and analysed their amino acid sequence. The occurrence of the corresponding polypeptide in the insoluble glycoprotein framework was finally probed by epitope mapping of the polyclonal antibodies using overlapping scan peptides which, together, cover the whole amino acid sequence of the putative precursor. As a control, peptide fragments released from the insoluble wall fraction by trypsin treatment were analysed by mass spectroscopy. By this approach, the heterodimeric, chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP3 proved to be a constituent of the insoluble extracellular matrix of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Furthermore, we have shown that the polypeptide backbones of both GP3 subunits are encoded by the same gene and differ by a C-terminal truncation in the case of GP3A.
    Molecular Microbiology 09/2010; DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07302.x · 5.03 Impact Factor
  • Combinatorial Peptide and Nonpeptide Libraries: A Handbook, 12/2007: pages 363 - 386; , ISBN: 9783527614912
  • Journal of Biological Chemistry 02/2005; 280(8):7407-7407. · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A polyclonal antibody was raised against a recombinant Chlamydomonas 14-3-3-beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) fusion protein and characterized for its epitope specificity towards the corresponding Chlamydomonas 14-3-3 protein by scan-peptide analysis. This antibody recognized four Chlamydomonas polypeptides with apparent molecular masses 32, 30, 27, and 24 kDa, which also reacted with the antiserum depleted of anti-(Escherichia coli beta-Gal) IgG, but not with the corresponding preimmune serum or the antiserum preincubated with purified 14-3-3 proteins. Western-blot analyses performed with the antibody depleted of anti-(beta-Gal) IgG revealed that more or less pronounced levels of 14-3-3 proteins were present in all subcellular fractions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii except the nuclei. The highest levels of 14-3-3 protein were observed in the cytosol and microsomal fraction. The 30-kDa isoform was predominant in the cytosol, whereas the 27-kDa isoform was prevalent in the microsomes. When microsomal membranes were separated by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, Western-blot analysis revealed distinct patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms in the endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosome, and plasma membrane fractions identified by marker enzyme activities. These findings indicate that the four 14-3-3 proteins of C. reinhardtii differentially interact with endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosomes, and plasma membrane.
    European Journal of Biochemistry 01/2002; 268(24):6449-57. DOI:10.1046/j.0014-2956.2001.02593.x · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new chitinase gene, chi92, encoding the largest known chitinase from Streptomyces olivaceoviridisATCC 11238 was sequenced by means of different PCR-methods. The cloned gene was expressed in E. coliand the recombinant protein could be detected by Western-blot analysis. The multiplicity of chitinolytic enzymes of this strain is discussed.
    Biotechnology Letters 07/2000; 22(15):1203-1209. DOI:10.1023/A:1005694532044 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A method is described for the elucidation of the peptide substrate phosphorylation specificity of a protein kinase. Peptide libraries with two to six degenerate positions and a length of seven or nine amino acids were generated directly on Sepharose beads by solid-phase peptide synthesis according to the split-and-mix procedure. The immobilized peptides were incubated with the catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) as a model enzyme resulting in the phosphorylation of the beads that contain the recognition motif of the kinase. The beads were then stained with a new phosphate-monoester-specific fluorescent dye consisting of a complex of iron(III) with fluorescein-coupled iminodiacetic acid. A flow cytometer was used to analyze the phosphorylation efficiency and the beads with the highest phosphorylation degree were isolated by the use of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Pool sequencing of those beads revealed the preferred kinase motif. The results are in good agreement with data from the literature. The method lends itself to the rapid elucidation of the specificity of uncharacterized protein kinases.
    Analytical Biochemistry 01/2000; 276(2):227-41. DOI:10.1006/abio.1999.4285 · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We cloned and successfully expressed the gene for xylitol dehydrogenase from Galactocandida mastotermitis in Escherichia coli. The amino acid sequence revealed that the enzyme belongs to the superfamily of zinc containing, medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme catalyses the second step in the xylose utilising pathway converting xylose to xylulosephosphate. Xylulose-phosphate is further degraded by the transaldolase and transketolase reactions of the pentose phosphate pathway. The purified xylitol dehydrogenase from G. mastotermitis was subjected to partial amino acid sequence analysis. The resulting amino acid information was then used to construct oligonucleotide probes for PCR amplification. The PCR product was used to screen a genomic library. The identified xdh gene includes one short intron at its 5' end. Putative regulatory signals were identified with the help of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulatory sequence databases. An intronless xdh transcript, cloned by RT-PCR, was actively expressed in pBTac1 at 37 degrees C to approximately 8% of the soluble E. coli protein. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters were determined and conditions were found to stabilise the soluble and active protein.
    Biological Chemistry 01/2000; 380(12):1405-11. DOI:10.1515/BC.1999.180 · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Xylose reductases catalyse the initial reaction in the xylose utilisation pathway, the NAD(P)H+H+ dependent reduction of xylose to xylitol. In this work, the xylose reductase gene from Candida tenuis CBS 4435 was cloned and successfully expressed in E. coli. From the purified and partially sequenced protein primers were deduced for PCR. The fragment obtained was used for Southern blot analysis and screening of a subgenomic library. The clone containing the open reading frame was sequenced; the gene consisted of 969 nucleotides coding for a 322 amino acids protein with a molecular mass of 36 kDa. Putative regulatory signals were identified with the help of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulatory sequence database. In order to express the xylose reductase in E. coli, the gene was placed under positive and negative control. At low temperatures, the xylose reductase was expressed in soluble and active form up to about 10% of the soluble protein; with rising temperatures formation of visible inclusion bodies occurred. In refolding experiments we were able to recover the major portion of xylose reductase activity from the pellet fraction.
    Biological Chemistry 01/2000; 380(12):1395-403. DOI:10.1515/BC.1999.179 · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The homo-dimeric structure of a vanadium-dependent haloperoxidase (V-BPO) from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum (EC 1.1.11.X) has been solved by single isomorphous replacement anomalous scattering (SIRAS) X-ray crystallography at 2.0 A resolution (PDB accession code 1QI9), using two heavy-atom datasets of a tungstate derivative measured at two different wavelengths. The protein sequence (SwissProt entry code P81701) of V-BPO was established by combining results from protein and DNA sequencing, and electron density interpretation. The enzyme has nearly an all-helical structure, with two four-helix bundles and only three small beta-sheets. The holoenzyme contains trigonal-bipyramidal coordinated vanadium atoms at its two active centres. Structural similarity to the only other structurally characterized vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidase (V-CPO) from Curvularia inaequalis exists in the vicinity of the active site and to a lesser extent in the central four-helix bundle. Despite the low sequence and structural similarity between V-BPO and V-CPO, the vanadium binding centres are highly conserved on the N-terminal side of an alpha-helix and include the proposed catalytic histidine residue (His418(V-BPO)/His404(V-CPO)). The V-BPO structure contains, in addition, a second histidine near the active site (His411(V-BPO)), which can alter the redox potential of the catalytically active VO2-O2 species by protonation/deprotonation reactions. Specific binding sites for the organic substrates, like indoles and monochlordimedone, or for halide ions are not visible in the V-BPO structure. A reaction mechanism for the enzymatic oxidation of halides is discussed, based on the present structural, spectroscopic and biochemical knowledge of vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases, explaining the observed enzymatic differences between both enzymes.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 11/1999; 293(3):595-611. DOI:10.1006/jmbi.1999.3179 · 3.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The selenoprotein phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) changes its physical characteristics and biological functions during sperm maturation. PHGPx exists as a soluble peroxidase in spermatids but persists in mature spermatozoa as an enzymatically inactive, oxidatively cross-linked, insoluble protein. In the midpiece of mature spermatozoa, PHGPx protein represents at least 50 percent of the capsule material that embeds the helix of mitochondria. The role of PHGPx as a structural protein may explain the mechanical instability of the mitochondrial midpiece that is observed in selenium deficiency.
    Science 09/1999; 285(5432):1393-6. DOI:10.1126/science.285.5432.1393 · 31.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a major proinflammatory cytokine mediating local and systemic responses of the immune system. Two types of IL-1 receptors are known, but only the IL-1 receptor type I initiates biological responses. Here we show that two proteins with nucleic acid binding potential and mortalin, a member of the HSP70-family, are associated with the IL-1 receptor type I irrespective of IL-1 binding. The association of mortalin with the IL-1 receptor type I is specifically reversed by ATP concentrations in the physiological range. Other nucleotides are not or much less effective. The in vitro dissociation of mortalin effects neither the receptor association nor the activity of IRAK, which initiates the IL-1-dependent phosphorylation cascade. The roles of the receptor-associated proteins are therefore discussed in the context of receptor internalisation.
    BioFactors 02/1999; 9(1):49-60. · 3.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a major proinflammatory cytokine mediating local and systemic responses of the immune system. Two types of IL-1 receptors are known, but only the IL-1 receptor type I initiates biological responses. Here we show that two proteins with nucleic acid binding potential and mortalin, a member of the HSP70-family, are associated with the IL-1 receptor type I irrespective of IL-1 binding. The association of mortalin with the IL-1 receptor type I is specifically reversed by ATP concentrations in the physiological range. Other nucleotides are not or much less effective. The in vitro dissociation of mortalin effects neither the receptor association nor the activity of IRAK, which initiates the IL-1-dependent phosphorylation cascade. The roles of the receptor-associated proteins are therefore discussed in the context of receptor internalisation.
    BioFactors 01/1999; 9(1):49 - 60. DOI:10.1002/biof.5520090107 · 3.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human T cell receptor CD4 is a type I integral membrane glycoprotein that is involved in T cell activation and also acts as the primary coreceptor for human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). Here the structure of a synthetic 38 amino acid peptide corresponding to the complete cytoplasmic domain of CD4 (CD4CYTO) has been investigated under a variety of solution conditions using a combination of circular dichroism and homonuclear two-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the presence of the membrane mimetic 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), a conformational change of CD4CYTO from a random coil to an alpha-helical structure was observed. In keeping with this, CD4CYTO has the potential to associate with membranes as demonstrated by binding studies of in vitro phosphorylated CD4CYTO with microsomal membranes. Both chemical shift and nuclear Overhauser enhancement data in 50% 2,2, 2-trifluoroethanol solution provide direct experimental evidence for the predominance of a short amphiphatic alpha-helix that is approximately 4 turns in length and extends from positions Arg-402 to Lys-417. The present data provide, for the first time, compelling experimental evidence that only a fraction of CD4CYTO has a propensity for adopting secondary structure under conditions that are assumed to exist at or near to the membrane surface and that this alpha-helical structure is located in the membrane-proximal region of CD4CYTO. The N-terminal residues, that link the alpha-helix to the transmembrane anchor of CD4, and a substantial C-terminal portion (14-18 residues) of CD4CYTO are unstructured under the solution conditions investigated. Correlation of our structural data with recent studies on the biological activity of CD4CYTO indicates that the alpha-helix is of crucial importance for the interaction of CD4 with Nef and Vpu in the process of HIV-mediated CD4 down-regulation.
    Biochemistry 07/1998; 37(23):8527-38. DOI:10.1021/bi9723111 · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A hydantoinase from Arthrobacter aurescens DSM 3745 has been purified to homogeneity with a yield of 77% using a three-step purification procedure. The active enzyme is a tetramer consisting of four identical subunits, each with a molecular mass of 49670 Da as determined by mass spectrometry. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme indicates sequence identities to cyclic amidases involved in the nucleotide metabolism as the d-hydantoinase from Agrobacterium radiobacter (53%), the d-selective dihydropyrimidinase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (38%), the allantoinase from Rana catesbeiana (26%), as well as to the catalytic subunit of the urease from Heliobacter pylori (50%). However, all studies based on substrate-dependent growth, induction and catalytic behavior documented the novelty of the bacterial hydantoinase and that its physiological role is not related to any of these enzymes or known metabolic pathways. Its substrate specificity differs from hydantoinases listed in Enzyme Nomenclature and is rather more predominant for the cleavage of aryl- than for alkyl-hydantoin derivatives. It is shown that the stereoselectivity of this enzyme depends on the substrate used for bioconversion: although it is strictly l-selective for the cleavage of d,l-5-indolylmethylhydantoin, it appears to be d-selective for the hydrolysis of d,l-methylthioethylhydantoin. Due to these findings we conclude that this novel bacterial hydantoinase should be classified as a new member of the EC-group 3.5.2 of cyclic amidases.
    Journal of Biotechnology 04/1998; 61(1-61):1-13. DOI:10.1016/S0168-1656(98)00005-4 · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    Michael Kiess, H J Hecht, Henryk M. Kalisz
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    ABSTRACT: The complete amino acid sequence of glucose oxidase from Penicillium amagasakiense was determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry of peptide fragments derived from three different specific proteolytic digests and a cyanogen bromide cleavage. The complete sequence of each monomer comprises 587 amino acid residues, contains three cysteine residues, and seven potential N-glycosylation sites, of which at least five were confirmed to be glycosylated. Glucose oxidase from P. amagasakiense shows a high degree of identity (66%) and 79% similarity to glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger, and is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase family. The tertiary structures of glucose oxidase from A. niger and cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum were superimposed to provide a template for the sequence comparison of members of the GMC family. The general topology of the GMC oxidoreductases is conserved, with the exception of the presence of an active site lid in cholesterol oxidase and the insertion of additional structural elements in the substrate-binding domain of alcohol oxidase. The overall structure can be divided into five distinct sequence regions: FAD-binding domain, extended FAD-binding domain, flavin attachment loop and intermediate region, FAD covering lid, and substrate-binding domain. The FAD-binding and the extended FAD-binding domains are composed of several separate sequence regions. The other three regions each comprise a single contiguous sequence. Four major consensus patterns have been identified, including the nucleotide-binding consensus sequence close to their N-termini. The functions of the two motifs recently selected by the Genetics Computer Group, Madison, Wisconsin, as additional signature patterns of the GMC oxidoreductases are discussed. The other consensus patterns belong to either the FAD-binding or the extended FAD-binding domain. In addition, the roles of conserved residues are discussed wherever possible.
    European Journal of Biochemistry 03/1998; 252(1):90-9. DOI:10.1046/j.1432-1327.1998.2520090.x · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tryparedoxin has recently been discovered as a constituent of the trypanosomal peroxidase system catalysing the reduction of a peroxiredoxin-type peroxidase by trypanothione [Nogoceke et al. (1997) Biol. Chem. 378, 827-836] and has attracted interest as a potential molecular target for the development of trypanocidal agents. Here we describe the first isolation of a novel gene from Crithidia fasciculata encoding a different tryparedoxin designated tryparedoxin II. The deduced amino acid sequence of tryparedoxin II (accession number AF055986) differs substantially from the partial sequence reported for the tryparedoxin described previously and now renamed tryparedoxin I. It shares the sequence motif Vx3FSAxWCPPCR shown to represent the catalytic site in tryparedoxin I [Gommel et al. (1997) Eur. J. Biochem. 248, 913-918] with mouse nucleoredoxin (accession number X92750), and a thioredoxin-like gene product of Caenorhabditis elegans (accession number U23511). Depending on which ATG is considered functional as translation start codon, tryparedoxin II, with 150 or 165 amino acid residues, is 50% larger than the typical thioredoxins. The tryparedoxins appear phylogenetically related to the thioredoxins, but sequence similarities are restricted to the active site motifs and their intimate neighbourhood. His-tagged tryparedoxin II expressed in E. coli exhibited ping-pong kinetics in the trypanothione:peroxiredoxin assay with kinetic parameters (KM peroxiredoxin = 4.2 microM, KM trypanothione = 33 microM, Vmax/[E] = 952 min(-1)) similar to those reported for tryparedoxin I [Gommel et al. (1997) Eur. J. Biochem. 248, 913-918]. The co-existence of two distinct tryparedoxins in C. fasciculata suggests diversified biological roles of this novel type of protein, which in trypanosomatids may substitute for the pleiotropic redox catalyst thioredoxin.
    Biological Chemistry 01/1998; 379(8-9):1137-42. DOI:10.1515/bchm.1998.379.8-9.1137 · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tryparedoxin, a thioredoxin-related protein from Crithidia fasciculata with a molecular mass of 16 kDa catalyses the reduction of a peroxiredoxin-type peroxidase, Cf21, at the expense of trypanothione [Nogoceke, E., Gommel, D. U., Kiess, M., Kalisz, H. M. & Flohé, L. E. (1997) Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 378, 827-836]. The kinetic analysis of tryparedoxin revealed an enzyme substitution mechanism. The corresponding molecular event was elucidated to be a reversible oxidoreduction of the disulfide bridge in the thioredoxin-related motif WCPPC. The amino-proximal cysteine residue of this active site was more reactive in S-alkylation experiments than the distal residue. The natural substrates of tryparedoxin, trypanothione and Cf21, could only be substituted by glutathione and glutathione disulfide with considerable loss in activity. The pronounced specificity of tryparedoxin is further accentuated by low limiting Km values for Cf21 and trypanothione (2.2 microM and 130 microM, respectively, as compared to 990 microM for gluthathione disulfide and an infinite value for glutathione). Tryparedoxin can therefore be classified as a trypanothione: peroxiredoxin oxidoreductase. The reduction of tryparedoxin by trypanothione appears to be the rate-limiting step in the trypanothione-dependent hydroperoxide reduction because(a) the regeneration of reduced tryparedoxin from the tryparedoxin-trypanothione complex is rate limiting (k[cat] 392 min[-1]), (b) the physiological trypanothione concentrations may not always saturate tryparedoxin, and (c) the rate constants for the net forward reaction of Cf21 are faster than those of the tryparedoxin reaction. The functional characteristics of tryparedoxin explain the limited capacity of trypanosomatids in coping with oxidative stress and qualify the enzyme as a potential target for the design of specific trypanocidal compounds.
    European Journal of Biochemistry 10/1997; 248(3):913-8. DOI:10.1111/j.1432-1033.1997.t01-1-00913.x · 3.58 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
100.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010
    • Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
      • Department of Chemical Biology (CBIO)
      Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 1996–1999
    • Technische Universität Braunschweig
      Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 1994
    • Grünenthal GmbH
      Aachen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany