Michael E. Jones

University of Oxford, Oxford, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (93)274.66 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the diffuse emission at 5 GHz in the first quadrant of the Galactic plane using two months of preliminary intensity data taken with the C-Band All Sky Survey (C-BASS) northern instrument at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, California. Combining C-BASS maps with ancillary data to make temperature-temperature plots we find synchrotron spectral indices of $\beta = -2.65 \pm 0.05$ between 0.408 GHz and 5 GHz and $ \beta = -2.72 \pm 0.09$ between 1.420 GHz and 5 GHz for $-10^{\circ} < |b| < -4^{\circ}$, $20^{\circ} < l < 40^{\circ}$. Through the subtraction of a radio recombination line (RRL) free-free template we determine the synchrotron spectral index in the Galactic plane ($ |b| < 4^{\circ}$) to be $\beta = -2.56 \pm 0.07$ between 0.408 GHz and 5 GHz, with a contribution of $53 \pm 8$ per cent from free-free emission at 5\,GHz. These results are consistent with previous low frequency measurements in the Galactic plane. By including C-BASS data in spectral fits we demonstrate the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) associated with the HII complexes W43, W44 and W47 near 30 GHz, at 4.4 sigma, 3.1 sigma and 2.5 sigma respectively. The CORNISH VLA 5 GHz source catalogue rules out the possibility that the excess emission detected around 30\;GHz may be due to ultra-compact HII regions. Diffuse AME was also identified at a 4 sigma level within $30^{\circ} < l < 40^{\circ}$, $-2^{\circ} < b < 2^{\circ}$ between 5 GHz and 22.8 GHz.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2015; 448(4). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stv212 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Proper modelling of astronomical receivers is vital: it describes the systematic errors in the raw data, guides the receiver design process, and assists data calibration. In this paper we describe a method of analytically modelling the full signal and noise behaviour of arbitrarily complex radio receivers. We use electrical scattering matrices to describe the signal behaviour of individual components in the receiver, and noise correlation matrices to describe their noise behaviour. These are combined to produce the full receiver model. We apply this approach to a specified receiver architecture: a hybrid of a continous comparison radiometer and correlation polarimeter designed for the C-Band All-Sky Survey. We produce analytic descriptions of the receiver Mueller matrix and noise temperature, and discuss how imperfections in crucial components affect the raw data. Many of the conclusions drawn are generally applicable to correlation polarimeters and continuous comparison radiometers.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2014; 446(2). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu2172 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Simulations of SKA1-low were performed to estimate the noise level in images produced by the telescope over a frequency range 50-600 MHz, which extends the 50-350 MHz range of the current baseline design. The root-mean-square (RMS) deviation between images produced by an ideal, error-free SKA1-low and those produced by SKA1-low with varying levels of uncorrelated gain and phase errors was simulated. The residual in-field and sidelobe noise levels were assessed. It was found that the RMS deviations decreased as the frequency increased. The residual sidelobe noise decreased by a factor of ~5 from 50 to 100 MHz, and continued to decrease at higher frequencies, attributable to wider strong sidelobes and brighter sources at lower frequencies. The thermal noise limit is found to range between ~10 - 0.3 $\mu$Jy and is reached after ~100-100 000 hrs integration, depending on observation frequency, with the shortest integration time required at ~100 MHz.
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    ABSTRACT: The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) is a project to map the full sky in total intensity and linear polarization at 5 GHz. The northern component of the survey uses a broadband single-frequency analogue receiver fitted to a 6.1-m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California, USA. The receiver architecture combines a continuous-comparison radiometer and a correlation polarimeter in a single receiver for stable simultaneous measurement of both total intensity and linear polarization, using custom-designed analogue receiver components. The continuous-comparison radiometer measures the temperature difference between the sky and temperature-stabilized cold electrical reference loads. A cryogenic front-end is used to minimize receiver noise, with a system temperature of $\approx 30$ K in both linear polarization and total intensity. Custom cryogenic notch filters are used to counteract man-made radio frequency interference. The radiometer $1/f$ noise is dominated by atmospheric fluctuations, while the polarimeter achieves a $1/f$ noise knee frequency of 10 mHz, equal to the telescope azimuthal scan frequency.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2013; DOI:10.1093/mnras/stt2359 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the cosmic microwave background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales(~1°). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters that form the focal planes use a compact design based on high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 μKs1/2) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 μKs1/2 at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range ℓ ~ 25-975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance, and sources of systematic error of the instrument.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2013; 768(1):9. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/768/1/9 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the development of two circularly symmetric antennas with high polarization purity and low spill-over. Both were designed to be used in an all-sky polarization and intensity survey at 5 GHz (the C-Band All-Sky Survey, C-BASS). The survey requirements call for very low cross-polar signal levels and far-out sidelobes. Two different existing antennas, with 6.1-m and 7.6-m diameter primaries, were adapted by replacing the feed and secondary optics, resulting in identical beam performances of 0.73° FWHM, cross-polarization better than - 50 dB, and far-out sidelobes below -70 dB. The polarization purity was realized by using a symmetric low-loss dielectric foam support structure for the secondary mirror, avoiding the need for secondary support struts. Ground spill-over was largely reduced by using absorbing baffles around the primary and secondary mirrors, and by the use of a low-sidelobe profiled corrugated feedhorn. The 6.1-m antenna and receiver have been completed and tested. Results show that the co-polar beam matches the design simulations very closely in the main beam and down to levels of - 80 dB in the backlobes. With the absorbing baffles in place the far-out ( >; 100°) sidelobe response is reduced below -90 dB. Cross-polar response could only be measured down to a noise floor of - 20 dB but is also consistent with the design simulations. Temperature loading and groundspill due to the secondary support were measured at less than 1 K.
    IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation 01/2013; 61(1):117-124. DOI:10.1109/TAP.2012.2219843 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the design and testing of a 2–20-GHz continuum-band analog lag correlator with 16 frequency channels for astronomical interferometry. The correlator has been designed for future use with a prototype single-baseline interferometer operating at 185–275 GHz. The design uses a broad-band Wilkinson divider tree with integral thin-film resistors implemented on an alumina substrate, and custom-made broad-band InGaP/GaAs Gilbert Cell multipliers. The prototype correlator has been fully bench-tested, together with the necessary readout electronics for acquisition of the output signals. The results of these measurements show that the response of the correlator is well behaved over the band. An investigation of the noise behavior also shows that the signal-to-noise ratio of the system is not limited by the correlator performance.
    IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement 08/2012; 61(8):2253-2261. DOI:10.1109/TIM.2012.2184960 · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 uK sqrt(s). Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of ~1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12.8', allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-Cl (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between l=25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with LCDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r=1.1+0.9-0.8 (r<2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r=1.2+0.9-0.8 (r<2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r=0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.
    The Astrophysical Journal 07/2012; 760(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/760/2/145 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the design and testing of a 2-20 GHz continuum band analog lag correlator with 16 frequency channels for astronomical interferometry. The correlator has been designed for future use with a prototype single-baseline interferometer operating at 185-275 GHz. The design uses a broadband Wilkinson divider tree with integral thin-film resistors implemented on an alumina substrate, and custom-made broadband InGaP/GaAs Gilbert Cell multipliers. The prototype correlator has been fully bench-tested, together with the necessary readout electronics for acquisition of the output signals. The results of these measurements show that the response of the correlator is well behaved over the band. An investigation of the noise behaviour also shows that the signal-to-noise of the system is not limited by the correlator performance.
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    ABSTRACT: The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43 GHz and 94 GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, over 10,000 hr of data were collected, first with the 19 element 43 GHz array (3458 hr) and then with the 90 element 94 GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering 1000 deg2. This paper reports initial results from the 43 GHz receiver, which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69 μK. The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until the null tests passed. Cross-correlating maps with different telescope pointings is used to eliminate a bias. This paper reports the EE, BB, and EB power spectra in the multipole range = 25-475. With the exception of the lowest multipole bin for one of the fields, where a polarized foreground, consistent with Galactic synchrotron radiation, is detected with 3σ significance, the E-mode spectrum is consistent with the ΛCDM model, confirming the only previous detection of the first acoustic peak. The B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero, leading to a measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.35+1.06 –0.87. The combination of a new time-stream "double-demodulation" technique, side-fed Dragonian optics, natural sky rotation, and frequent boresight rotation leads to the lowest level of systematic contamination in the B-mode power so far reported, below the level of r = 0.1.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2011; 741(2):111. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/111 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe an upgrade to the Cosmic Background Imager instrument to increase its surface brightness sensitivity at small angular scales. The upgrade consisted of replacing the thirteen 0.9-m antennas with 1.4-m antennas incorporating a novel combination of design features, which provided excellent sidelobe and spillover performance for low manufacturing cost. Off-the-shelf spun primaries were used, and the secondary mirrors were oversized and shaped relative to a standard Cassegrain in order to provide an optimum compromise between aperture efficiency and low spillover lobes. Low-order distortions in the primary mirrors were compensated for by custom machining of the secondary mirrors. The secondaries were supported on a transparent dielectric foam cone to minimize scattering. The antennas were tested in the complete instrument, and the beam shape and spillover noise contributions were as expected. We demonstrate the performance of the telescope and the inter-calibration with the previous system using observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cluster Abell 1689. The enhanced instrument has been used to study the cosmic microwave background, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and diffuse Galactic emission.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 08/2011; 418(4). DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19661.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The diffuse cm wave IR-correlated signal, the 'anomalous' CMB foreground, is thought to arise in the dust in cirrus clouds. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) cm wave data of two translucent clouds, ζ Oph and LDN 1780 with the aim of characterizing the anomalous emission in the translucent cloud environment. In ζ Oph, the measured brightness at 31 GHz is 2.4σ higher than an extrapolation from 5-GHz measurements assuming a free-free spectrum on 8 arcmin scales. The SED of this cloud on angular scales of 1° is dominated by free-free emission in the cm range. In LDN 1780 we detected a 3σ excess in the SED on angular scales of 1° that can be fitted using a spinning dust model. In this cloud, there is a spatial correlation between the CBI data and IR images, which trace dust. The correlation is better with near-IR templates (IRAS 12 and 25 μm) than with IRAS 100 μm, which suggests a very small grain origin for the emission at 31 GHz. We calculated the 31-GHz emissivities in both clouds. They are similar and have intermediate values between that of cirrus clouds and dark clouds. Nevertheless, we found an indication of an inverse relationship between emissivity and column density, which further supports the VSGs origin for the cm emission since the proportion of big relative to small grains is smaller in diffuse clouds.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2011; 414(3):2424-2435. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.18562.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The diffuse cm-wave IR-correlated signal, the "anomalous" CMB foreground, is thought to arise in the dust in cirrus clouds. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) cm-wave data of two translucent clouds, {\zeta} Oph and LDN 1780 with the aim of characterising the anomalous emission in the translucent cloud environment. In {\zeta} Oph, the measured brightness at 31 GHz is 2.4{\sigma} higher than an extrapolation from 5 GHz measurements assuming a free-free spectrum on 8 arcmin scales. The SED of this cloud on angular scales of 1{\odot} is dominated by free-free emission in the cm-range. In LDN 1780 we detected a 3 {\sigma} excess in the SED on angular scales of 1{\odot} that can be fitted using a spinning dust model. In this cloud, there is a spatial correlation between the CBI data and IR images, which trace dust. The correlation is better with near-IR templates (IRAS 12 and 25 {\mu}m) than with IRAS 100 {\mu}m, which suggests a very small grain origin for the emission at 31 GHz. We calculated the 31 GHz emissivities in both clouds. They are similar and have intermediate values between that of cirrus clouds and dark clouds. Nevertheless, we found an indication of an inverse relationship between emissivity and column density, which further supports the VSGs origin for the cm-emission since the proportion of big relative to small grains is smaller in diffuse clouds.
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    ABSTRACT: We present a parametrized model of the intracluster medium that is suitable for jointly analysing pointed observations of the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) effect and X-ray emission in galaxy clusters. The model is based on assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, the Navarro, Frenk and White model for the dark matter and a softened power-law profile for the gas entropy. We test this entropy-based model against high and low signal-to-noise ratio ratio mock observations of a relaxed and recently merged cluster from N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, using Bayesian hyperparameters to optimize the relative statistical weighting of the mock SZ and X-ray data. We find that it accurately reproduces both the global values of the cluster temperature, total mass and gas mass fraction (fgas), and the radial dependencies of these quantities outside the core (r > 100 kpc). For reference, we also provide a comparison with results from the single isothermal β model. We confirm previous results that the single isothermal β model can result in significant biases in derived cluster properties.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2010; 410(1):341 - 358. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17447.x · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lynds dark cloud LDN1622 represents one of the best examples of anomalous dust emission, possibly originating from small spinning dust grains. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) 31-GHz data of LDN1621, a diffuse dark cloud to the north of LDN1622 in a region known as Orion East. A broken ring-like structure with diameter approximate to 20 arcmin of diffuse emission is detected at 31 GHz, at approximate to 20-30 mJy beam-1 with an angular resolution of approximate to 5 arcmin. The ring-like structure is highly correlated with far-infrared (FIR) emission at 12-100 mu m with correlation coefficients of r approximate to 0.7-0.8, significant at similar to 10 Sigma. The FIR-correlated emission at 31 GHz therefore appears to be mostly due to radiation associated with dust. Multifrequency data are used to place constraints on other components of emission that could be contributing to the 31-GHz flux. An analysis of the GB6 survey maps at 4.85 GHz yields a 3 Sigma upper limit on free-free emission of 7.2 mJy beam-1 (less than or similar to 30 per cent of the observed flux) at the CBI resolution. The bulk of the 31-GHz flux therefore appears to be mostly due to dust radiation. Aperture photometry, at an angular resolution of 13 arcmin and with an aperture of diameter 30 arcmin, allowed the use of IRAS maps and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-yr W-band map at 93.5 GHz. A single modified blackbody model was fitted to the data to estimate the contribution from thermal dust, which amounts to similar to 10 per cent at 31 GHz. In this model, an excess of 1.52 +/- 0.66 Jy (2.3 Sigma) is seen at 31 GHz. Correlations with the IRAS 100 mu m gave a coupling coefficient of 18.1 +/- 4.4 mu K (MJy sr-1)-1, consistent with the values found for LDN1622.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2010; DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17079.x · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) aims to produce sensitive, all-sky maps of diffuse Galactic emission at 5 GHz in total intensity and linear polarization. These maps will be used (with other surveys) to separate the several astrophysical components contributing to microwave emission, and in particular will allow an accurate map of synchrotron emission to be produced for the subtraction of foregrounds from measurements of the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background. We describe the design of the analog instrument, the optics of our 6.1 m dish at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, the status of observations, and first-look data. Comment: 10 pages, 11 figures, published in Proceedings of SPIE MIllimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy V (2010), Vol. 7741, 77411I-1 - 77411I-10
    Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering 08/2010; DOI:10.1117/12.858011 · 0.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Very Small Array (VSA) has been used to survey the l = 27 to 46 deg, |b|<4 deg region of the Galactic plane at a resolution of 13 arcmin. The survey consists of 44 pointings of the VSA, each with a r.m.s. sensitivity of ~90 mJy/beam. These data are combined in a mosaic to produce a map of the area. The majority of the sources within the map are HII regions. We investigated anomalous radio emission from the warm dust in 9 HII regions of the survey by making spectra extending from GHz frequencies to the FIR IRAS frequencies. Acillary radio data at 1.4, 2.7, 4.85, 8.35, 10.55, 14.35 and 94 GHz in addition to the 100, 60, 25 and 12 micron IRAS bands were used to construct the spectra. From each spectrum the free-free, thermal dust and anomalous dust emission were determined for each HII region. The mean ratio of 33 GHz anomalous flux density to FIR 100 micron flux density for the 9 selected HII regions was 1.10 +/-0.21x10^(-4). When combined with 6 HII regions previously observed with the VSA and the CBI, the anomalous emission from warm dust in HII regions is detected with a 33 GHz emissivity of 4.65 +/- 0.4 micro K/ (MJy/sr) at 11.5{\sigma}. The anomalous radio emission in HII regions is on average 41+/-10 per cent of the radio continuum at 33 GHz. Comment: 18 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
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    ABSTRACT: The Very Small Array (VSA) has been used to survey the ℓ∼ 27° to region of the Galactic plane at a resolution of 13 arcmin. This ℓ-range covers a section through the Local, Sagittarius and the Cetus spiral arms. The survey consists of 44 pointings of the VSA, each with an rms sensitivity of ∼90 mJy beam−1. These data are combined in a mosaic to produce a map of the area. The majority of the sources within the map are H ii regions.The main aim of the programme was to investigate the anomalous radio emission from the warm dust in individual H ii regions of the survey. This programme required making a spectrum extending from GHz frequencies to the far-infrared (FIR) IRAS frequencies for each of nine strong sources selected to lie in unconfused areas. It was necessary to process each of the frequency maps with the same u, v coverage as was used for the VSA 33 GHz observations. The additional radio data were at 1.4, 2.7, 4.85, 8.35, 10.55, 14.35 and 94 GHz in addition to the 100, 60, 25 and 12 μm IRAS bands. From each spectrum the free–free, thermal dust and anomalous dust emission were determined for each H ii region. The mean ratio of 33 GHz anomalous flux density to FIR 100 μm flux density for the nine selected H ii regions was ΔS(33 GHz)/S(100 μm) = 1.10 ± 0.21 × 10−4. When combined with six H ii regions previously observed with the VSA and the Cosmic Background Imager, the anomalous emission from warm dust in H ii regions is detected with a 33 GHz emissivity of 4.65 ± 0.40 μK (MJy sr−1)−1 (11.5σ). This level of anomalous emission is 0.3 to 0.5 of that detected in cool dust clouds.A radio spectrum of the H ii region anomalous emission covering GHz frequencies is constructed. It has the shape expected for spinning dust composed of very small grains. The anomalous radio emission in H ii regions is on average 41 ± 10 per cent of the radio continuum at 33 GHz. Another result is that the excess (i.e. non-free–free) emission from H ii regions at 94 GHz correlates strongly with the 100 μm emission; it is also inversely correlated with the dust temperature. Both these latter results are as expected for very large grain dust emission. The anomalous emission on the other hand is expected to originate in very small spinning grains and correlates more closely with the 25 μm emission.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 06/2010; 406(3):1629 - 1643. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16809.x · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lynds dark cloud LDN1622 represents one of the best examples of anomalous dust emission, possibly originating from small spinning dust grains. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) 31 GHz data of LDN1621, a diffuse dark cloud to the north of LDN1622 in a region known as Orion East. A broken ring with diameter g\approx 20 arcmin of diffuse emission is detected at 31 GHz, at \approx 20-30 mJy beam$^{-1}$ with an angular resolution of \approx 5 arcmin. The ring-like structure is highly correlated with Far Infra-Red emission at $12-100 \mu$m with correlation coefficients of r \approx 0.7-0.8, significant at $\sim10\sigma$. Multi-frequency data are used to place constraints on other components of emission that could be contributing to the 31 GHz flux. An analysis of the GB6 survey maps at 4.85 GHz yields a $3\sigma$ upper limit on free-free emission of 7.2 mJy beam$^{-1}$ ($\la 30 per cent of the observed flux) at the CBI resolution. The bulk of the 31 GHz flux therefore appears to be mostly due to dust radiation. Aperture photometry, at an angular resolution of 13 arcmin and with an aperture of diameter 30 arcmin, allowed the use of IRAS maps and the {\it WMAP} 5-year W-band map at 93.5 GHz. A single modified blackbody model was fitted to the data to estimate the contribution from thermal dust, which amounts to $\sim$ 10 per cent at 31 GHz. In this model, an excess of 1.52\pm 0.66 Jy (2.3\sigma) is seen at 31 GHz. Future high frequency $\sim$ 100-1000 GHz data, such as those from the {\it Planck} satellite, are required to accurately determine the thermal dust contribution at 31 GHz. Correlations with the IRAS $100 \mu$m gave a coupling coefficient of $18.1\pm4.4 \mu$K (MJy/sr)$^{-1}$, consistent with the values found for LDN1622. Comment: 8 pages, 3 figures, 3 tables, submitted to MNRAS
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    ABSTRACT: The C-Band All Sky Survey (C-BASS) will perform an all sky-survey in total intensity and polarization at 5GHz to sub-millikelvin sensitivity. The resulting map will serve as a synchrotron template for foreground subtraction from future CMB studies. CBASS data will also be used to map the magnetic field of our Galaxy, and in combination with other data sets it may shed some light on the nature of the anomalous dust-correlated emission in the Galaxy. The Northern map observations have begun in Owens Valley, California, with the Southern sky to follow from South Africa. In this talk we present an overview of the experiment, focusing on a description of the instrument and the primary science goals of the project.

Publication Stats

2k Citations
274.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2015
    • University of Oxford
      • Department of Physics
      Oxford, England, United Kingdom
  • 2013
    • University of Concepción
      • Departamento de Astronomía
      Ciudad de Concepcion, Biobío, Chile
  • 2010
    • Universidad de La Laguna
      • Department of Astrophysics
      San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain
  • 2008
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2001–2008
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Physics: Cavendish Laboratory
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2004
    • University of Porto
      • Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto
      Oporto, Porto, Portugal
  • 2003–2004
    • Spanish National Research Council
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2002
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Astronomy
      Berkeley, MO, United States
  • 1998
    • Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom