A M Domeney

ETH Zurich, Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland

Are you A M Domeney?

Claim your profile

Publications (15)40.85 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Human attentional impairments can be modelled in the rat using the prepulse inhibition (PPI) or the latent inhibition (LI) paradigm. The present study investigated the consequences of a combination of pre-weaning maternal separation (MS) and post-weaning social isolation (SI) on both PPI and LI in male and female Sprague–Dawley rats tested as adults. We report here a double dissociation between the effects of MS (repeated 4 h daily separations) and SI on PPI and LI: MS did not modify PPI, but enhanced LI. In contrast, SI disrupted PPI, the deficits being restricted to male rats, but left LI intact. There were no additive effects of MS and SI on PPI or LI. While MS improved avoidance learning, SI impaired it. Although both PPI and LI assess processes of selective attention, our results support the contention, already stated in the literature, that they involve differing neuro-psychological mechanisms. Furthermore, the fact that only males exhibited PPI deficits following SI has implications for the well-known differential vulnerability of human males to certain psychiatric disorders (e.g. schizophrenia). Finally, the combination of MS and SI could represent a relevant animal model for some aspects of schizophrenia, since both PPI and LI were altered.
    Behavioural Brain Research 07/2001; · 3.33 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Early life stressful manipulations, such as maternal separation (MS) or social isolation (SI), can influence the neurobiological development of rats and alter the response of adult animals to drugs of abuse. The present study examined the acute and sensitized behavioral responses (locomotor activity (LMA) and stereotypy) induced by amphetamine after MS or SI in male and female rats. In addition, the hypothesis that the combination of SI and MS could lead to additional effects on the behavioral response to amphetamine was tested. After the repetitive, intermittent administration of 1.5 mg/kg D-amphetamine over five consecutive days, the behavioral expression of sensitization to a challenge injection was assessed following a 2-day withdrawal period. In both sexes, MS and SI did not alter the acute locomotor activating effects of amphetamine as measured in the open-field environment after the first administration of the drug. Whereas SI altered the expression of sensitization to amphetamine in both sexes, MS did not affect it. Finally, in none of the behavioral variables measured did MS and SI interact to further modify the behavioral profile of the animals. The present results suggest that a postweaning manipulation of the environment (SI) is more effective than a preweaning manipulation (MS) in modifying the expression of sensitization to amphetamine.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 01/2001; 70(2-3):397-409. · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • I C Weiss, L Di Iorio, J Feldon, A M Domeney
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The authors investigated the effects of isolation rearing on acoustic startle response, prepulse inhibition (PPI), its modification by apomorphine, and locomotor activity in 3 rat strains: Wistar (WS), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Lister hooded (LH). SD and LH, but not WS, showed isolation-induced PPI deficits. In 2 consecutive PPI tests, only SD isolates showed significant PPI deficits. An isolation rearing effect in LH was significant only in the 1st PPI test. Apomorphine dose-dependently (0.0-0.5 mg/kg) disrupted PPI, but sensitivity to the drug differed, with WS and SD rats being more sensitive to lower doses (0.01-0.05 mg/kg) than LH rats (0.5 mg/kg). Isolates, irrespective of strain, did not differ from grouped rats in their response to the apomorphine challenge. Only WS and LH isolates demonstrated significantly increased locomotor activity. Strain differences in the different parameters measured did not predict isolation-induced effects on PPI.
    Behavioral Neuroscience 05/2000; 114(2):364-73. · 2.63 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rearing rats in isolation has been shown to be a relevant paradigm for studying early life stress and understanding the genesis of depression and related affective disorders. Recent studies from our laboratory point to the relevance of studying the social isolation syndrome as a function of home caging conditions. Accordingly, the present series of experiments assessed the contribution of each condition to the expression of the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle, food hoarding and spontaneous locomotor activity. In addition, ex vivo neurochemical changes in the brains of isolated and grouped rats reared either in sawdust-lined or in grid-floor cages were determined by measuring dopamine and serotonin as well as their major metabolites in a "psychosis circuit" that includes mainly the hippocampus and selected hippocampal efferent pathways projecting towards the anterior cingulate and infralimbic cortices, nucleus accumbens, dorsolateral caudate nucleus, amygdala and entorhinal cortex. The results of the present study demonstrate that rearing rats in isolation (i) produces a syndrome of generalized locomotor hyperactivity; (ii) increases the startle response; (iii) impairs prepulse inhibition; (iv) tends to increase food hoarding behavior; (v) increases basal dopamine turnover in the amygdaloid complex; (vi) decreases basal dopamine turnover in the infralimbic part of the medial prefrontal cortex; and (vii) decreases basal turnover of serotonin in the nucleus accumbens. In the entorhinal cortex, dopamine neurotransmission seemed to be more sensitive to the caging conditions since a decreased basal turnover of dopamine was observed in grid-reared animals. Plasma corticosterone levels were also increased in grid-reared animals compared with rats reared in sawdust cages. Finally, isolates reared on grids showed a significant positive correlation between plasma corticosterone levels and dopamine in the left nucleus accumbens.Altogether, these results support the contention that there is a link between social isolation, attention deficit, spontaneous locomotor hyperactivity and reduced dopamine turnover in the medial prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that rearing rats in grid-floor cages represents a form of chronic mild stress associated with increased corticosterone levels, decreased basal turnover of entorhinal dopamine and increased dopamine activity in the left nucleus accumbens. Finally, a significant and selective decrease in the basal turnover of serotonin in the nucleus accumbens of isolated rats may be linked to the isolation-induced locomotor hyperactivity.
    Neuroscience 02/2000; 100(4):749-68. · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study determined the impact of early handling (EH) in rats on behavioral response to environmental stress and on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) binding characteristics (Bmax and Kd) in various organs. The behavioral consequences of EH in rats were expressed as increased exploratory activity in an open-field paradigm, when compared with nonhandled control rats. These findings are interpreted in terms of decreased emotionality. The biochemical consequences of EH, in both male and female rats, were expressed as the upregulation of PBR in the adrenal and kidney and the downregulation of gonadal (testis and ovary) PBR. It is possible that the long-lasting adrenal and renal changes in PBR expression in EH rats may enable better regulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, renin–angiotensin system, and autonomic nervous system responses to stress in adulthood. The significance of the EH-induced reduction in gonadal PBR for gonadal activity in adulthood is as yet unclear.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 01/2000; · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Isabelle C Weiss, Joram Feldon, Annette M Domeney
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated the influence of circadian time (experimental testing during the light or dark phase of the light:dark cycle) on the acoustic startle response (ASR), prepulse inhibition (PPI), and apomorphine-induced PPI deficits in Wistar rats housed under a reversed light:dark cycle (lights off at 0700 h and on at 1900 h). There was no significant difference in the startle response amplitude or PPI response of animals tested during the light phase compared with those tested during the dark phase. Similarly, the response to apomorphine (0.01–0.05 mg/kg subcutaneously) was not modulated by circadian time. Thus, under the conditions adopted in the present study, ASR, PPI, and apomorphine-induced PPI deficits remained stable across the circadian cycle. Such findings may be of importance for other investigators using the PPI paradigm to study brain plasticity mechanisms and pharmacological manipulations of apomorphine-induced PPI deficits in rats housed under normal or reversed light:dark cycle conditions.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 12/1999; · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • I C Weiss, J Feldon, A M Domeney
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated isolation-induced disruptions of prepulse inhibition (PPI), and effects on locomotor activity as a function of home caging condition (sawdust vs grid-floor) in the Wistar rat. Isolates reared in grid-floor cages did not show a disruption of PPI. However, when isolates were reared in sawdust cages, a PPI deficit was evident. In an open field environment, isolates demonstrated significantly increased spontaneous locomotor activity compared to their group-housed counterparts, irrespective of the caging condition employed. Grouped animals reared in grid-floor cages, however, showed reduced activity compared to grouped animals reared in sawdust cages. Although d-amphetamine treatment appeared to enhance locomotor activity selectively in isolates, particularly in those reared in grid-floor cages, this result could be explained by the existing pre-drug activity levels. With respect to PPI, not only were isolation-induced deficits in the Wistar rat difficult to detect in a variable prepulse intensity PPI procedure, but when apparent, the deficits were of a fragile nature. The findings suggest that caging condition may be a critical methodological factor in experiments investigating isolation-induced PPI deficits. Indeed, our results may indicate that rearing animals in grid-floor cages represents a form of chronic mild stress, which can interfere with normal sensorimotor gating mechanisms, in addition to other behaviours.
    Behavioural Pharmacology 04/1999; 10(2):139-49. · 2.30 Impact Factor
  • I.C. Weiss, J. Feldon, A.M. Domeney
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 01/1999; 64(3). · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 01/1999; 64(4). · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The long-term effects of prenatal stress (three times daily restraint stress during the last week of gestation) on the behavioral response to stress, as assessed by novelty-induced locomotion, performance in the forced swim test, and the acquisition of a two-way active avoidance, were investigated in two inbred strains of rats, Fischer 344 (F344/NHsd/Zur) and Lewis (LEW/SsNHsd/Zur). Additional measures included birth weights, pain threshold on the hot plate, and basal and stress-induced corticosterone secretion. In all of the behavioral paradigms strain differences were found: LEW rats showed poorer acquisition of avoidance conditioning, displayed higher levels of activity on the open plate, less immobility time in the forced swim test, and lower pain thresholds in the hot-plate test compared with F344 rats. LEW rats had higher birth weights after prenatal stress, whereas F344 rats were lighter. Following prenatal stress the pattern of behavioral effects obtained in LEW rats in stress-related tests could be interpreted as improved coping abilities with stress, i.e., improved acquisition of active avoidance, less immobility in the forced swim test, and reduced novelty-induced locomotion. Prenatal stress was much less effective in inducing long-term behavioral changes in F344 rats, yielding only one effect, namely, enhanced novelty-induced locomotion in female F344 rats. Pain thresholds were increased as a consequence of prenatal stress, irrespective of strain and gender. Basal and stress-induced corticosterone release differed in the two strains, with LEW rats showing less stress-induced corticosterone release. Prenatal stress did not, however, affect basal or stress-induced corticosterone release. The results suggest that prenatal stress exerts long-term effects on behavior, which depend on the genetic background.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 05/1998; 59(4):799-805. · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the present study we investigated the effect of repeated maternal separation on postnatal days 12, 14, 16, and 18 for 6 h/day on Wistar rats on three latent inhibition (LI) paradigms: two-way active avoidance, conditioned emotional response (CER), and conditioned taste aversion (CTA). In addition, hyperactivity induced by d-amphetamine and stereotypies induced by apomorphine were evaluated. In all three LI experiments, the control animals showed only marginal LI, whereas the maternally separated animals showed enhanced LI (only males in CTA). In two-way active avoidance within the nonpreexposed condition maternally separated animals showed improved acquisition of avoidance learning compared with the control animals. Sensitivity in response to amphetamine and apomorphine was not altered by the maternal separation procedure. Thus, maternal separation in this study, contrary to previous reports, but in line with results obtained following early handling before weaning, led to enhancement of the LI phenomenon as assessed in each of the three procedures. As our maternal separation procedure (6 h on days 12, 14, 16, and 18) led to behavioral outcomes that differed from those reported by Ellenbroek and Cools (24 h on day 10), it is suggested that maternal separation regimens that are dissimilar may lead to different and sometimes opposite behavioral effects.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 05/1998; 59(4):873-82. · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Annette Domeney, Joram Feldon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Postweaning isolation rearing in rats is shown to have consequences for the expression of numerous behaviors. The present studies investigated isolation-induced disruptions of the prepulse inhibition (PPI) response in the Wistar rat strain, as a function of exposure of the animals to locomotor activity testing. Further, repeated testing of PPI was investigated to examine the robustness of the isolation-induced disruptions. The results indicate that experimentally naive isolation-reared animals exhibit disruptions in the PPI response that are retained in a second test 7 days later. The disruptions obtained are shown to be consistent across all pulse frequencies examined and independent of effects on startle. Exposure to activity testing, however, either before or after the measurement of PPI, abolished the isolation-induced disruption of PPI in a subsequent test. In contrast, locomotor activity testing consistently revealed a hyperactivity response in isolation-reared animals that was not influenced by the temporal occurrence of the testing. The findings are discussed relative to the interpretation of data emerging from studies where both activity testing and PPI are performed in the same animals, and in the relation to the use of PPI in isolation-reared animals as representing a nonpharmacological animal model of schizophrenia.
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior 05/1998; · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Behavioural Pharmacology 01/1998; 9. · 2.30 Impact Factor
  • I. Weiss, J. Feldon, A. Domeney
    Behavioural Pharmacology 01/1998; 9(1). · 2.30 Impact Factor
  • I. Weiss, J. Feldon, A. Domeney
    Behavioural Pharmacology 01/1998; 9(1). · 2.30 Impact Factor