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Publications (6)12.96 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To analyze the effect of weight on psychological and functional outcomes in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, including self-perception, depression, functional level, fatigue, and self-rated health status. Methods One hundred and one (n = 101) patients with MS participated in this cross-sectional study. Outcomes were scores in the Beck Depression Inventory, NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEOFFI), Functional Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis (FAMS), Fatigue Impact Scale, and Quality Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36). Patients were classified as normal weight (18.5 < BMI < 24.9 kg/m(2)) or overweight (25.0 > BMI > 29.9 kg/m(2)). One-way analysis of covariance was conducted with gender, age, and years with disease as covariates. Results Depression levels were significantly higher in overweight versus normal-weight MS patients (F = 6.381; P = 0.013). NEOFFI scores were significantly higher in overweight versus normal-weight MS patients for extraversion (F = 6.331; P = 0.014), conscientiousness (F = 4.794; P = 0.034), and neuroticism (F = 5.422; P = 0.022) but not for openness (F = 2.174; P = 0.109) or agreeableness (F = 0.047; P = 0.829). The two groups did not significantly differ in fatigue (P > 00.5). Scores in general (F = 4.708; P = 0.032) and mental health (F = 4.583; P = 0.035) SF-36 domains were significantly lower in overweight versus normal-weight patients. Scores for FAMS domains of emotional well-being (F = 8.050; P = 0.006), general contentment (F = 7.967; P = 0.006), and family/social well-being (F = 7.662; P = 0.007) were significantly lower in overweight versus normal-weight patients. Conclusions Overweight MS patients evidenced higher depression levels, lower functional capacity, and worse self-rated health status in comparison to normal-weight MS patients. These results suggest that weight control programs should be incorporated into the management of patients with MS.
    Nutritional Neuroscience 09/2014; · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 1, to assess the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) and widespread pressure hyperalgesia; and, 2, to assess the relationship between the presence of active TrPs, pain intensity, and widespread pressure hypersensitivity in individuals with post-meniscectomy pain. Thirty-three patients with post-meniscectomy pain, 46 to 60 years of age, and 33 matched controls participated. TrPs were explored bilaterally within the tensor fasciae latae, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, adductor magnus, adductor longus, semitendinosus, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius muscles in a blinded fashion. TrPs were considered active if the referred pain reproduced knee symptoms. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were also assessed bilaterally over the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, patellar tendon, second metacarpal and tibialis anterior. Pain was collected with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS, 0-10). Patients with post -meniscectomy pain showed a greater (P<0.001) number of active TrPs (mean: 2±1) and a similar number (P=0.611) of latent TrPs (mean: 4±4) than healthy controls (mean latent TrP: 4±1). A greater number of active TrPs was associated with higher pain intensity (r=0.352; P=0.045). Patients also exhibited reduced PPT over the affected vastus medialis and patellar tendon (P<0.05) and bilaterally over the tibialis anterior muscle (P=0.001). A greater the number of active muscle TrPs was also associated with widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia. The referred pain elicited by active TrPs reproduced knee symptoms in patients with post-meniscectomy pain. Patients also showed localized reduction of PPT. The number of TrPs was associated with the intensity of pain and pressure hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest the presence of peripheral sensitization in patients with post-meniscectomy pain could be associated with the presence of active TrPs.
    The Clinical journal of pain 04/2014; · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is considered a simple entrapment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. In the last years, several studies have demonstrated the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms. To review the basis neurophysiology of peripheral and central sensitization by applying them to CTS and to determine their clinical repercussions. Several studies have revealed that patients with CTS exhibit somato-sensory changes in areas innervated by the median nerve and also in areas non-related with the median nerve. Individuals with CTS exhibited widespread mechanical and thermal pain hyperalgesia, although they suffered from unilateral symptoms. Further, patients also showed wide-spread impairments in vibration conduction, deficits in fine motor control and changes in the somato-sensory cortex. These evidences support the presence of a complex process of peripheral and central sensitization in patients with CTS which may constitute a negative prognosis factor for the management of these patients. The advances in neurosciences in the last years support the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in CTS. These mechanisms justify the necessity of conceptual changes and in the management, both conservative and surgical, of this syndrome. Additionally, central sensitization can also play a relevant role in the prognosis of CTS since it can constitute a negative prognosis factor for its treatment.
    Revista de neurologia 04/2012; 54(8):490-6. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) vary greatly and can depend on the severity of the clinical symptoms. To characterise the description and self-perception of pain in a sample of patients with CTS and to determine whether that perception of pain differs among the patients on the basis of electrodiagnostic severity criteria. The sample consisted of 92 females with CTS, who were classified as having mild, moderate or severe CTS, bearing in mind electrodiagnostic criteria. Different instruments were used in the study: a numerical scale (0-10) to evaluate the intensity of the pain, the McGill questionnaire to classify the descriptors that represent the quality of the pain, and the Boston questionnaire for assessing symptom severity and disability. The most representative descriptors were the presence of tingling (92%), heaviness (67%) and a feeling of swelling (64%). The women with mild CTS showed a longer history of pain than those with moderate and severe CTS (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences among the intensity of the pain, the disability questionnaire and most of the descriptors on the McGill questionnaire between the different groups of mild, moderate or severe CTS. The women with severe CTS described the pain as being periodic, repetitive and terribly unpleasant more often than those with mild or moderate CTS (p < 0.05). The presence of tingling and the feeling of heaviness are the most prevalent symptoms of CTS. There are no great differences in the quality of the pain among cases of mild, moderate or severe CTS.
    Revista de neurologia 04/2012; 54(7):407-14. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the differences in widespread pressure pain and thermal hypersensitivity in women with minimal, moderate, and severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy controls. A total of 72 women with CTS (19 with minimal, 18 with moderate, and 35 with severe) and 19 healthy age-matched women participated. Pressure pain thresholds were bilaterally assessed over the median, ulnar, and radial nerves, the C5 to C6 zygapophyseal joint, the carpal tunnel, and the tibialis anterior muscle. In addition, warm and cold detection thresholds and heat and cold pain thresholds were bilaterally assessed over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence. All outcome parameters were assessed by an assessor blinded to the participant's condition. No significant differences in pain parameters among patients with minimal, moderate, and severe CTS were found. The results showed that PPT were significantly decreased bilaterally over the median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the carpal tunnel, C5 to C6 zygapophyseal joint, and the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS as compared with healthy controls (all, P<0.001). In addition, patients with CTS also showed lower heat pain threshold and reduced cold pain threshold compared with controls (P<0.001). No significant sensory differences between minimal, moderate, or severe CTS were found. The similar widespread pressure and thermal hypersensitivity in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS and pain intensity suggests that increased pain sensitivity is not related to electrodiagnostic findings.
    The Clinical journal of pain 05/2011; 27(9):747-54. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A case control, blinded study. To compare the amount of cervical range of motion in women with minimal, mild/moderate, and severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) to that of healthy control participants. We also assessed the relationships between cervical range of motion and clinical variables related to the intensity and temporal profile of pain within each CTS group. It is plausible that the cervical spine may be involved in individuals with CTS. No study has investigated the relationship between cervical range of motion and symptoms associated with CTS severity. Cervical range of motion was assessed in 71 women with CTS (18 with minimal, 18 with mild/moderate, and 35 with severe signs and symptoms) and in 20 similar, healthy women. Those with CTS were aged 35 to 59 years (mean ± SD, 45 ± 8 years) and those in the healthy group were aged 31 to 60 years (45 ± 8 years). An experienced therapist, blinded to the participants' conditions, used a cervical range-of-motion (CROM) device to assess cervical range of motion. Mixed-model analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were conducted to evaluate the differences in cervical range of motion among the 3 groups of patients with CTS and healthy controls. A corrected P value of less than .025 was used as threshold for significance (Bonferroni correction). The mixed-model ANOVAs revealed that the individuals with CTS exhibited restricted cervical range of motion compared to healthy controls (P<.001), with no significant differences among the groups with minimal, mild/moderate, or severe CTS (P>.356). A significant negative correlation between pain intensity and cervical spine lateral flexion away from the affected side was identified: the greater the mean pain intensity, the lesser the cervical lateral flexion away from the affected side. Women with minimal, mild/moderate, or severe CTS exhibited less cervical range of motion compared to women of a similar age, suggesting that restricted cervical range of motion may be a common feature in individuals with CTS, independent of severity subgroups, as defined by electrodiagnosis. Future research should investigate cervical range of motion as a possible consequence or causative factor of CTS and related symptoms.
    Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy 04/2011; 41(5):305-10. · 2.95 Impact Factor