Rabih Nasr

Staten Island University Hospital, Coney Island, NY, United States

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Publications (5)0.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is either due to deficient secretion of arginine vasopressin (central) or to tubular unresponsiveness (nephrogenic). Drug induced DI is a well-known entity with an extensive list of medications. Polyuria is generally defined as urine output exceeding 3 liters per day in adults. It is crucial to identify the cause of diabetes insipidus and to implement therapy as early as possible to prevent the electrolyte disturbances and the associated mortality and morbidity. It is very rare to have an idiosyncratic effect after a short use of a medication, and physicians should be aware of such a complication to avoid volume depletion. The diagnosis of diabetes insipidus is very challenging because it relies on laboratory values, urine output, and the physical examination of the patient. A high clinical suspicion of diabetes insipidus should be enough to initiate treatment. The complications related to DI are mostly related to the electrolyte imbalance that can affect the normal physiology of different organ systems.
    ISRN Nephrology. 03/2013; 2013.
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    ABSTRACT: One factor associated with poor outcomes in hemodialysis patients is exposure to a foreign membrane. Older membranes are very bioincompatible and increase complement activation, cause leukocytosis by activating circulating factors, which sequesters leukocytes in the lungs, and activates platelets. Recently, newer membranes have been developed that were designed to be more biocompatible. We tested if the different "optiflux" hemodialysis membranes had different effects on platelet levels. Ninety-nine maintenance hemodialysis patients with no known systemic or hematologic diseases affecting their platelets had blood drawn immediately prior to, 90 minutes into, and immediately following their first hemodialysis session of the week. All patients were dialyzed using a Fresenius Medical Care Optiflux polysulfone membrane F160, F180, or F200 (polysulfone synthetic dialyzer membranes, 1.6 m(2), 1.8 m(2), and 2.0 m(2) surface area, respectively, electron beam sterilized). Platelet counts were measured from each sample by analysis using a CBC analyzer. The average age of the patients was 62.7 years; 36 were female and 63 were male. The mean platelet count pre, mid, and post dialysis was 193 (standard deviation ±74.86), 191 (standard deviation ±74.67), and 197 (standard deviation ±79.34) thousand/mm3, respectively, with no statistical differences. Newer membranes have no significant effect on platelet count. This suggests that they are, in fact, more biocompatible than their predecessors and may explain their association with increased survival.
    International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease 01/2013; 6:143-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin B12 deficiency may have deleterious effects on end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on maintenance hemodialysis, and may increase erythropoietin stimulating agent (ESA) resistance, yet little is known about its prevalence in this population. Serum vitamin B12 and methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels were drawn from ESRD patients prior to hemodialysis. All patients with MMA levels greater than 800 nmol/L had peripheral smears evaluated for B12 deficiency. Those with confirmatory smears were considered to be deficient and received intramuscular vitamin B12 injections for 4 months. Post-treatment MMA levels and smears were obtained. Erythropoietin dosages were monitored throughout the treatment period. There was a 58% (60/103) prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency as defined by a positive MMA level and a positive blood smear. Out of 52 patients with positive smears, 36 (69.2%) were negative on repeat analysis after B12 treatment. Mean Epogen® (EPO) dosages significantly decreased by 16,572 ± 41,902 units per month from baseline to the post-B12 t reatment period (P = 0.0082, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Three months prior to treatment, the mean monthly EPO dose was 82,067 ± 47,906 and post, the mean EPO usage was 65,495 ± 39,691. Post treatment hemoglobin levels were not significantly different from baseline. Vitamin B12 supplementation was associated with a decrease in the mean dose of ESA administration while maintaining a stable hemoglobin level. Maintaining serum vitamin B12 levels improves functionality, and may allow a decrease in the use of ESA's, avoiding their toxicities and significant costs.
    International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease 01/2013; 6:89-93.
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Alport's syndrome is an X-linked hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane associated with ocular and hearing defects. In women, the disease is much less severe compared to that in men. However, women with Alport's syndrome can have an accelerated form of their disease during pregnancy with worsening of kidney function and can also develop preeclampsia. There are only four described cases of Alport's syndrome in pregnancy. Case Presentation. 20-year-old woman with a history of Alport's syndrome, which during pregnancy worsened resulting in hypertension, proteinuria, and acute kidney injury. Fortunately, there was complete resolution of the proteinuria and kidney injury with delivery, and the patient did not require any renal replacement therapy. Conclusion. One of the four reported cases had an accelerated form of the disease during pregnancy with rapid progression of kidney injury and end-stage renal disease. There are no definite guidelines to monitor these patients during pregnancy. Further studies are required to understand the exact pathophysiology of kidney damage that occurs in pregnant women with Alport's syndrome. This may give us some insight into the prognostic predictors, so that we can monitor these women more thoroughly and prevent adverse outcomes.
    Case Reports in Medicine 01/2013; 2013:374020.
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have demonstrated the role of inflammation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) rather than other white cell parameters was found to be a useful inflammatory marker to predict adverse outcomes in medical and surgical conditions. Nevertheless, the value of NLR in predicting DN has not been elucidated. An observational study included 338 diabetic patients, who were followed at our clinic between 2007 and 2009. We arranged our patients into tertiles according to their 2007 NLR. The primary outcome was continuous decrease of GFR >12 mL/min between 2007 and 2009 with the last GFR <60 mL/min. The lowest NLR tertile had fewer patients (2.7%) with primary outcome (i.e., worsening renal function) compared with middle and highest NLR tertiles, which had more patients with primary outcomes (8.7% and 11.5%, respectively) with a significant p-value 0.0164. When other potential confounders were individually analyzed with NLR tertile, the NLR tertiles remained a significant predictor of poor GFR outcome in the presence of other variables (hemoglobin A1C, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, age, and congestive heart failure with p-values 0.018, 0.019, 0.017, 0.033, and 0.022, respectively). NLR predicted the worsening of the renal function in diabetic patients. Further studies are needed to confirm this result.
    Renal Failure 03/2012; 34(5):571-6. · 0.94 Impact Factor