Ami A Shah

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (19)117.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We sought to retrospectively review a single-center experience using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of refractory, active diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). The mean modified Rodnan Skin score (mRSS) at baseline was compared to the mRSS at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post-IVIG initiation by the paired Student t test. Changes in mRSS at 6 and 12 months were also compared to data from historical controls of 3 large, negative, multicenter, randomized clinical trials of other medications [D-penicillamine (D-pen), recombinant human relaxin (relaxin), and oral bovine type I collagen (collagen)] and to patients treated with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) alone using the Student t test. Thirty patients were treated with adjunctive IVIG (2 g/kg/mo) for refractory, active dcSSc. The mean baseline mRSS of our cohort was 29.6 ± 7.2, and this significantly decreased to 24.1 ± 9.6 (n = 29, p = 0.0011) at 6 months, 22.5 ± 10.0 (n = 25, p = 0.0001) at 12 months, 20.6 ± 11.8 (n = 23, p = 0.0001) at 18 months, and 15.3 ± 6.4 (n = 15, p < 0.0001) at 24 months. The mean change in mRSS at 6 months was not significantly different in the IVIG group (-5.3 ± 7.9) compared to the relaxin trial (-4.8 ± 6.99, p = 0.74) or MMF group (-3.4 ± 7.4, p = 0.26); however, at 12 months, the mean change in mRSS was significantly better in the IVIG group (-8 ± 8.3) than in the D-pen (-2.47 ± 8.6, p = 0.005) and collagen (-3.4 ± 7.12, p = 0.005) groups, and was comparable to the group of primary MMF responders (-7.1 ± 9, p = 0.67). Our observational study suggests that IVIG may be an effective adjunctive therapy for active dcSSc in patients failing other therapies.
    The Journal of rheumatology. 11/2014;
  • Arthritis & Rheumatology. 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the profile and frequency of malignancy subtypes in a large single centre UK cohort for patients with scleroderma (systemic sclerosis; SSc). We evaluated the cancer risk among SSc patients with different antibody reactivities and explored the temporal association of cancer with the duration between onset of SSc and cancer diagnosis. A retrospective study of a well-characterised cohort of SSc cases attending a large tertiary referral centre was undertaken with clinical data collected through our clinical database and review of patient records. We evaluated development of all cancers in this cohort and comparison was assessed with the SSc cohort without cancer. The effect of demographics and clinical details including antibody reactivities were explored to find associations for development of cancer in SSc. Among 2177 patients with SSc, 7.1% of patients had a history of cancer. 26% were positive for anti-centromere antibodies (ACA), 18.2% were positive for anti-Scl70 antibodies and 26.6% were positive for anti-RNA polymerase III antibody (RNAP). The major malignancy subtypes were breast cancer (42.2%), haematological (12.3%), gastrointestinal (11.0%) and gynaecological cancers (11.0%). The frequency of cancers among patients with RNAP (14.2%) was significantly increased than those with anti-Scl70 (6.3%) and ACA (6.8%) (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.001 respectively). Among the patients, who were diagnosed with cancer within 36 months of the clinical onset of SSc, there were more patients with RNAP (55.3%) than other autoantibody specificities (ACA 23.5%; p < 0.008 and anti-Scl70 antibodies 13.6%, p < 0.002 respectively). Breast cancers were temporally associated with onset of SSc among patients with anti-RNAP and SSc patients with anti-RNAP had two-fold increased hazard ratio for cancers compared to patients with ACA (p < 0.0001). Our study confirmed independently, in the largest population examined to date, that there is an association with cancer among SSc patients with anti-RNAP antibodies in close temporal relationship to onset of SSc, which supports the paraneoplastic phenomenon in this subset of SSc cases. An index of suspicion should be cautiously maintained in these cases and investigations for underlying malignancy should be considered where clinically appropriate.
    Arthritis research & therapy 02/2014; 16(1):R53. · 4.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical trial design in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) has been hampered by lack of consensus on appropriate outcome measures for reliably assessing treatment response. In the setting of connective tissue diseases (CTDs), some measures of ILD disease activity and severity may be confounded by non-pulmonary comorbidities. The Connective Tissue Disease associated Interstitial Lung Disease (CTD-ILD) working group of Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-a non-profit international organisation dedicated to consensus methodology in identification of outcome measures-conducted a series of investigations which included a Delphi process including >248 ILD medical experts as well as patient focus groups culminating in a nominal group panel of ILD experts and patients. The goal was to define and develop a consensus on the status of outcome measure candidates for use in randomised controlled trials in CTD-ILD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). A core set comprising specific measures in the domains of lung physiology, lung imaging, survival, dyspnoea, cough and health-related quality of life is proposed as appropriate for consideration for use in a hypothetical 1-year multicentre clinical trial for either CTD-ILD or IPF. As many widely used instruments were found to lack full validation, an agenda for future research is proposed. Identification of consensus preliminary domains and instruments to measure them was attained and is a major advance anticipated to facilitate multicentre RCTs in the field.
    Thorax 12/2013; · 8.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to develop a standard classification of digital ulcers (DUs) in systemic sclerosis (SSc) for use in observational or therapeutic studies and to assess the reliability of these definitions as well as of the measurement of ulcer area. Ten North American rheumatologists with expertise in SSc reviewed multiple photos of DUs, examined four SSc subjects with DUs, and came to a consensus on the definitions for digital, active, healed, and indeterminate ulcers. These ten raters then examined the right hand of ten SSc subjects twice and the left hand once to classify ulcers and to measure ulcer area. Weighted and Fleiss kappa were used to calculate intra- and interrater agreement on classification of ulcers, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess agreement on ulcer area. Because the traditional ICC calculations relied on a small number of ulcers, ICCs were recalculated using the results of linear mixed models to evaluate the variance components of observations on all the data. Intrarater kappa for classifying DU as not an ulcer/healed ulcer versus active/indeterminate ulcer was substantial (0.76), and interrater kappa was moderate (0.53). The ICC for ulcer area using the linear mixed models was moderate both for intrarater (0.57) and interrater (0.48) measurements. A consensus for the classification of DUs in SSc was developed, and after a training session, rheumatologists with expertise in SSc are able to reliably classify DUs and to measure ulcer area.
    Clinical Rheumatology 12/2013; · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autoimmune diseases are thought to be initiated by exposures to foreign antigens that cross-react with endogenous molecules. Scleroderma is an autoimmune connective tissue disease in which patients make antibodies to a limited group of autoantigens, including RPC1, encoded by the POLR3A gene. As patients with scleroderma and antibodies against RPC1 are at elevated risk for cancer, we hypothesized that the "foreign" antigens in this autoimmune disease are encoded by somatically mutated genes in the patients' incipient cancers. Studying cancers from scleroderma patients, we found genetic alterations of the POLR3A locus in six of eight patients with antibodies to RPC1 but not in eight patients without antibodies to RPC1. Analyses of peripheral blood lymphocytes and serum suggested that POLR3A mutations sparked cellular immunity and cross-reactive humoral immune responses. These results offer insight into the pathogenesis of scleroderma and provide support for the idea that acquired immunity helps control naturally occurring cancers.
    Science 12/2013; · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: -Systemic sclerosis associated pulmonary artery hypertension (SScPAH) has a worse prognosis compared to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), with a median survival of 3 years after diagnosis often due to right ventricular (RV) failure. We tested if SScPAH or systemic sclerosis related pulmonary hypertension with interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD-PH) imposes a greater pulmonary vascular load than IPAH and/or leads to worse RV contractile function. -We analyzed pulmonary artery pressures and mean flow in 282 patients with pulmonary hypertension (166 SScPAH, 49 SSc-ILD-PH, 67 IPAH). An inverse relation between pulmonary resistance (RPA) and compliance (CPA) was similar for all three groups, with a near constant resistance × compliance product. RV pressure-volume loops were measured in a subset, IPAH (n=5) and SScPAH (n=7) as well as SSc without PH (SSc-no-PH, n=7) to derive contractile indexes (end-systolic elastance [Ees] and preload recruitable stroke work [Msw]), measures of right ventricular load (arterial elastance [Ea]), and RV-pulmonary artery coupling (Ees/Ea). RV afterload was similar in SScPAH and IPAH (RPA=7.0±4.5 vs. 7.9±4.3 Wood units; Ea=0.9±0.4 vs. 1.2±0.5 mmHg/mL; CPA=2.4±1.5 vs. 1.7±1.1 mL/mmHg; p>0.3 for each). Though SScPAH did not have greater vascular stiffening compared to IPAH, RV contractility was more depressed (Ees=0.8±0.3 vs. 2.3±1.1, p<0.01; Msw=21±11 vs. 45±16, p=0.01), with differential RV-PA uncoupling (Ees/Ea=1.0±0.5 vs. 2.1±1.0, p=.03). This ratio was higher in SSc-no-PH (Ees/Ea = 2.3±1.2, p=0.02 vs. SScPAH). -RV dysfunction is worse in SScPAH compared to IPAH at similar afterload, and may be due to intrinsic systolic function rather than enhanced pulmonary vascular resistive and/or pulsatile loading.
    Circulation Heart Failure 06/2013; · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Experience suggests that African Americans may express autoimmune disease differently than other racial groups. In the context of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), we sought to determine whether race was related to a more adverse expression of disease. Between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2009, a total of 409 African American and 1808 white patients with scleroderma were evaluated at a single university medical center. While the distribution by sex was virtually identical in both groups, at 82% female, African American patients presented to the center at a younger mean age than white patients (47 vs. 53 yr; p < 0.001). Two-thirds of white patients manifested the limited cutaneous subset of disease, whereas the majority of African American patients manifested the diffuse cutaneous subset (p < 0.001). The proportion seropositive for anticentromere antibody was nearly 3-fold greater among white patients, at 34%, compared to African American patients (12%; p < 0.001). Nearly a third of African American (31%) patients had autoantibodies to topoisomerase, compared to 19% of white patients (p = 0.001). Notably, African American patients experienced an increase in prevalence of cardiac (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-2.2), renal (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1), digital ischemia (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4-2.2), muscle (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.3), and restrictive lung (OR, 6.9; 95% CI, 5.1-9.4) disease. Overall, 700 (32%) patients died (159 African American; 541 white). The cumulative incidence of mortality at 10 years was 43% among African American patients compared to 35% among white patients (log-rank p = 0.0011). Compared to white patients, African American patients experienced an 80% increase in risk of mortality (relative risk [RR], 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4-2.2), after adjustment for age at disease onset and disease duration. Further adjustment by sex, disease subtype, and scleroderma-specific autoantibody status, and for the socioeconomic measures of educational attainment and health insurance status, diminished these risk estimates (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6). The heightened risk of mortality persisted in strata defined by age at disease onset, diffuse cutaneous disease, anticentromere seropositivity, decade of care at the center, and among women. These findings support the notion that race is related to a distinct phenotypic profile in scleroderma, and a more unfavorable prognosis among African Americans, warranting heightened diagnostic evaluation and vigilant care of these patients. Further, we provide a chronologic review of the literature regarding race, organ system involvement, and mortality in scleroderma; we furnish synopses of relevant reports, and summarize findings.
    Medicine 06/2013; · 4.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Treprostinil diethanolamine is an innovative salt form of the prostacyclin analogue, treprostinil sodium, developed as an oral sustained release (SR) osmotic tablet. The availability of a formulation permitting convenient systemic delivery might have applicability to scleroderma vascular complications. We evaluated pharmacokinetics and perfusion in scleroderma patients with digital ischemia following escalating twice-daily doses of treprostinil diethanolamine SR. METHODS: In this dual-center, open-label, phase I pharmacokinetic study, scleroderma patients with digital ulcers were enrolled. Drug concentrations and perfusion, quantified by laser Doppler imaging, were measured over 12 hours at the 2mg and 4mg (or maximally tolerated) doses. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from individual plasma concentration versus time profiles using non-compartmental analysis methods. Digital perfusion and skin temperature were modeled as a function of log-transformed drug concentration and other covariates by performing repeated measures analyses using random effects models. RESULTS: Nineteen scleroderma patients (84% female, 53% limited scleroderma) received treprostinil diethanolamine SR with dose titration up to 4mg twice daily as tolerated. Peak concentrations (mean maximum plasma concentration [Cmax] = 1176 and 2107 pg/mL) occurred approximately 3.6 hours after dose administration, and overall exposure (under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to 12 hours post dose [AUC0-12] = 7187 and 12992 hr*pg/mL) was linear between the 2mg and 4mg doses. Perfusion and digital skin temperature were positively associated with log-transformed plasma concentration at the 4mg dose (p=0.015 and p=0.013, respectively). The most frequent adverse events were similar to those seen with prostacyclin analogues. CONCLUSIONS: Oral treprostinil diethanolamine was effectively absorbed in patients with scleroderma. Drug administration was temporally associated with improved cutaneous perfusion and temperature. Treprostinil diethanolamine may provide a new therapeutic option for Raynaud's phenomenon and the peripheral vascular disease of scleroderma. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00848939.
    Arthritis research & therapy 04/2013; 15(2):R54. · 4.27 Impact Factor
  • Ami A Shah, Fredrick M Wigley
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is unique among the rheumatic diseases because it presents the challenge of managing a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a widespread obliterative vasculopathy of small arteries that is associated with varying degrees of tissue fibrosis. The hallmark of scleroderma is clinical heterogeneity with subsets that vary in the degree of disease expression, organ involvement, and ultimate prognosis. Thus, the term scleroderma is used to describe patients who have common manifestations that link them together, whereas a highly variable clinical course exists that spans from mild and subtle findings to aggressive, life-threatening multisystem disease. The physician needs to carefully characterize each patient to understand the specific manifestations and level of disease activity to decide appropriate treatment. This is particularly important in treating a patient with scleroderma because there is no treatment that has been proven to modify the overall disease course, although therapy that targets specific organ involvement early before irreversible damage occurs improves both quality of life and survival. This review describes our approach as defined by evidence, expert opinion, and our experience treating patients. Scleroderma is a multisystem disease with variable expression; thus, any treatment plan must be holistic, yet at the same time focus on the dominant organ disease. The goal of therapy is to improve quality of life by minimizing specific organ involvement and subsequent life-threatening disease. At the same time the many factors that alter daily function need to be addressed, including nutrition, pain, deconditioning, musculoskeletal disuse, comorbid conditions, and the emotional aspects of the disease, such as fear, depression, and the social withdrawal caused by disfigurement.
    Mayo Clinic Proceedings 04/2013; 88(4):377-93. · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Annual echocardiography screening is widely used in scleroderma, but the utility of longitudinal assessment is unknown. We evaluated whether change in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was a risk factor for mortality and development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in a cohort of scleroderma patients. METHODS: The study population consisted of scleroderma patients who had at least three echocardiograms and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) over ≥1 year as part of routine care. The annual rate of change in RVSP was determined for each subject. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to assess the association between PAH and mortality and change in RVSP/year, adjusted for relevant covariates. RESULTS: 613 scleroderma patients with 3244 echocardiograms were studied. The adjusted relative hazards of PAH and mortality were 1.08 (95% CI 1.05-1.11) and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.15) per 1 mm Hg increase in RVSP/year, respectively. Compared with patients with a stable RVSP, the relative hazards for the development of PAH were 1.90 (95% CI 0.91-3.96), 5.09 (95% CI 2.53-10.26) and 6.15 (95% CI 3.58-10.56) for subjects whose RVSP increased at rates of 1-1.99, 2-2.99 and 3+ mm Hg/year. Compared with the same reference group, the relative hazards for death were 0.92 (95% CI 0.48-1.73), 2.16 (95% CI 1.16-4.01) and 5.05 (95% CI 3.47-7.34) for subjects whose RVSP increased at rates of 1-1.99, 2-2.99 and 3+ mm Hg/year. CONCLUSIONS: In a population of scleroderma patients, the rate of increase in RVSP is a risk factor for mortality and PAH even after adjustment for clinical characteristics and longitudinal PFT data.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 08/2012; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of systemic sclerosis (SSc) demonstrated three non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) susceptibility loci. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of these gene variants on survival and severity of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in SSc. The authors examined 1443 Caucasian SSc patients enrolled in the Genetics versus Environment In Scleroderma Outcome Study (GENISOS) and Scleroderma Family Registry (n = 914 - discovery cohort) and The Johns Hopkins Scleroderma Cohort (n = 529 - replication cohort). Forced vital capacity (FVC)% predicted was used as a surrogate for ILD severity. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms, IRF5 (rs10488631, rs12537284, rs4728142), STAT4 (rs3821236), CD247 (rs2056626) reached genome-wide significance in the SSc-GWAS and were examined in the current study. Overall, 15.5% of the patients had died over the follow-up period of 5.5 years. The IRF5 rs4728142 minor allele was predictive of longer survival in the discovery cohort (p = 0.021) and in the independent replication cohort (p = 0.047) and combined group (HR: 0.75, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.90, p = 0.002). The association of this SNP with survival was independent of age at disease onset, disease type and autoantibody profile (anticentromere and antitopoisomerase antibodies). The minor allele frequency of IRF5 rs4728142 was 49.4%. Moreover, IRF5 rs4728142 minor allele correlated with higher FVC% predicted at enrolment (p = 0.019). Finally, the IRF5 rs4728142 minor allele was associated with lower IRF5 transcript expression in patients and controls (p = 0.016 and p = 0.034, respectively), suggesting that the IRF5, rs4728142 SNP, may be functionally relevant. An SNP in the IRF5 promoter region (rs4728142), associated with lower IRF5 transcript levels, was predictive of longer survival and milder ILD in patients with SSc.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 03/2012; 71(7):1197-202. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    Ami A Shah, Antony Rosen
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    ABSTRACT: Most epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an increased risk of cancer in scleroderma patients. Reasons for this risk increase have been poorly understood and often attributed to cytotoxic therapies or damage from scleroderma. Recognition that some patients have a close temporal relationship between cancer diagnosis and scleroderma clinical onset has focused attention on the possibility that scleroderma may be a paraneoplastic syndrome in a subset of patients. This review will discuss the latest epidemiologic data linking cancer and scleroderma and explore a model for the development of paraneoplastic scleroderma. New investigations have demonstrated an association between RNA polymerase III autoantibodies and a close temporal relationship between cancer diagnosis and the development of clinical scleroderma. A unique nucleolar RNA polymerase III expression pattern has been identified in malignant tissue from these scleroderma patients suggesting that autoantigen expression in the cancer and the autoantibody response are associated. Similar data in inflammatory myositis have illustrated that disease-specific autoantigens may be expressed in cancers and damaged target tissues (muscle) undergoing regeneration. These data suggest a model of paraneoplastic autoimmunity in which cross-reactive immune responses may target autoantigens that are expressed in both cancers and diseased autoimmune target tissues.
    Current opinion in rheumatology 08/2011; 23(6):530-5. · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immunosuppressive therapy may potentially alter the natural disease course of scleroderma. There have been reports of using mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for the treatment of scleroderma skin disease. To analyse the experience of using MMF for the treatment of active diffuse cutaneous scleroderma. The authors compared the change in mean modified Rodnan skin scores (mRSS) in an MMF cohort at baseline with scores at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and with those of historical controls from a pooled analysis of three multicentre randomised clinical trials of recombinant human relaxin, d-penicillamine and oral bovine type I collagen. Improvement in mRSS after treatment with MMF compared with baseline was seen as early as 3 months and continued through the 12-month follow-up. The mRSS of the MMF cohort was not different from that of the historical controls at 6 months (MMF -3.05 ± 7.4 vs relaxin -4.83 ± 6.99, p=0.059), but was significantly lower at 12 months (MMF -7.59 ± 10.1 vs d-penicillamine -2.47 ± 8.6, p<0.001; collagen -3.4 ± 7.12, p=0.002). General and muscle severity scores and quality of life measures also improved compared with baseline. Pulmonary function remained stable. MMF may benefit skin disease in patients with diffuse scleroderma, but prospective studies are required to determine its role.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 03/2011; 70(6):1104-7. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to examine the temporal relationship between scleroderma development and malignancy, and to evaluate whether this differs by autoantibody status among affected patients. Study participants had a diagnosis of scleroderma, a diagnosis of cancer, cancer, an available serum sample, and a cancer pathology specimen. Sera were tested for autoantibodies against topoisomerase I, centromere, and RNA polymerase I/III by immunoprecipitation and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical and demographic characteristics were compared across autoantibody categories. Expression of RNA polymerases I and III was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using cancerous tissue from patients with anti-RNA polymerase antibodies. Twenty-three patients were enrolled. Six patients tested positive for anti-RNA polymerase I/III, 5 for anti-topoisomerase I, and 8 for anticentromere, and 4 were not positive for any of these antigens. The median duration of scleroderma at cancer diagnosis differed significantly between groups (-1.2 years in the anti-RNA polymerase I/III group, +13.4 years in the anti-topoisomerase I group, +11.1 years in the anticentromere group, and +2.3 years in the group that was negative for all antigens tested) (P = 0.027). RNA polymerase III demonstrated a robust nucleolar staining pattern in 4 of 5 available tumors from patients with antibodies to RNA polymerase I/III. In contrast, nucleolar RNA polymerase III staining was not detected in any of 4 examined tumors from the RNA polymerase antibody-negative group (P = 0.048). Our findings indicate that there is a close temporal relationship between the onset of cancer and scleroderma in patients with antibodies to RNA polymerase I/III, which is distinct from scleroderma patients with other autoantibody specificities. In this study, autoantibody response and tumor antigen expression are associated. We propose that malignancy may initiate the scleroderma-specific immune response and drive disease in a subset of scleroderma patients.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 09/2010; 62(9):2787-95. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical markers are needed to identify scleroderma patients at risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) since early therapy may improve survival. We investigated whether increased numbers of telangiectases in scleroderma associate with measures of pulmonary vascular disease. One hundred forty-seven consecutive adult patients with scleroderma were enrolled in this cross-sectional study and scored for the presence of matted telangiectases on 11 body areas. Per body area, telangiectases were scored as 0 if none were present, 1 if there were fewer than 10 telangiectases, and 2 if 10 or more telangiectases were counted. Linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and telangiectasia score, adjusted for age, race, smoking status, scleroderma subtype, disease duration, and autoantibody status. Logistic regression analysis was performed with PAH by right-heart catheterization (RHC) as the dependent variable. The mean telangiectasia score was 6.0 (SD 4.5, range 0-20). RVSP and telangiectasia score were positively correlated (r = 0.271, p = 0.001). The mean RVSP increased by 10.9 mm Hg for every 10-point increase in telangiectasia score (95% CI 3.6-18.3 mm Hg, p = 0.004), adjusted for potential confounders. The adjusted relative odds of PAH by RHC were 12.4 for patients with a 10-point increase in telangiectasia score (95% CI 1.78-85.9, p = 0.01). Increased numbers of telangiectases strongly associate with the presence of pulmonary vascular disease. Telangiectases may be a clinical marker of more widespread aberrant microvascular disease in scleroderma.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 12/2009; 37(1):98-104. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • Allan C Gelber, Ami A Shah
    The Journal of Rheumatology 10/2008; 35(9):1894. · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • Ami A Shah, Fredrick M Wigley
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    ABSTRACT: Many clinical manifestations of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) often go unrecognized; yet they can cause significant morbidity and are challenging to manage. This article discusses osteolysis, avascular necrosis of the wrist, oral manifestations, erectile dysfunction, pharyngeal weakness, fecal incontinence, nonscleroderma renal disease, liver disease, thyroid disease, and neurological disease in the scleroderma patient.
    Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America 03/2008; 34(1):221-38; ix. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 19-year-old woman with newly diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypertension, tonic-clonic seizures, blurry vision, nephrotic syndrome and renal insufficiency. At a general hospital, the investigations included brain MRI, echocardiography, laboratory tests including measurement of the amount of protein excreted daily, platelet count, levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine and anticardiolipin antibodies, direct Coombs' test, peripheral blood smear, and measurement of blood pressure. At a tertiary institution the investigations included physical examination, electroencephalography, brain MRI, magnetic resonance angiography, repetition of laboratory tests plus measurement of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease activity, measurement of levels of antibodies to double-stranded DNA and platelets, and renal biopsy. Thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with a possible underlying diagnosis of malignant hypertension, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or active SLE. At the general hospital, therapy included a single dose of intravenous cyclophosphamide 500 mg, eight daily plasma exchange treatments, three daily infusions of methylprednisolone 1 g followed by methylprednisolone 60 mg every 8 h, an infusion of rituximab 657 mg and ultrafiltration via hemodialysis. At the tertiary institution, therapy included an infusion of cyclophosphamide 650 mg, aspirin 81 mg daily, prednisone 40 mg daily, mycophenolate mofetil 750 mg twice daily, and aggressive management of hypertension.
    Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology 07/2007; 3(6):357-62. · 5.85 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

123 Citations
117.85 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2014
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Division of Rheumatology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2013
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Ashburn, Virginia, United States
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      Dallas, Texas, United States