Eric M Feeley

University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States

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Publications (5)87.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The IFITM family of proteins inhibit a growing number of pathogenic viruses, among them influenza A virus, dengue virus, hepatitis C virus, and Ebola virus. This review covers recent developments in our understanding of the IFITM's molecular determinants, potential mechanisms of action, and impact on pathogenesis.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 09/2013; · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IFITM3 is an interferon stimulated gene which inhibits the replication of multiple pathogenic viruses in vitro and in vivo. IFITM3 is a member of a large protein super family, whose members share a functionally-undefined area of high amino acid conservation, the CD225 domain. We performed mutational analyses of IFITM3 and identified multiple residues within the CD225 domain, consisting of the first intramembrane domain (IM1) and a conserved intracellular loop (CIL), that are required for restriction of both influenza A virus (IAV) and dengue virus (DENV) infection in vitro. Two phenylalanines within IM1 (F75 and F78) also mediate a physical association between IFITM proteins, and the loss of this interaction decreases IFITM3-mediated restriction. By extension, similar IM1-mediated associations may contribute to the functions of additional members of the CD225 domain family. IFITM3's distal N-terminal domain is also needed for full anti-viral activity, including a tyrosine (Y20), whose alteration results in mislocalization of a portion of IFITM3 to the cell periphery and surface. Comparative analyses demonstrate that similar molecular determinants are needed for IFITM3's restriction of both IAV and DENV. However, a portion of the CIL including Y99 and R87 is preferentially needed for inhibition of the orthomyxovirus. Several IFITM3 proteins engineered with rare single nucleotide polymorphisms demonstrated reduced expression or mislocalization, and these events were associated with enhanced viral replication in vitro, suggesting that possessing such alleles may impact an individual's risk for viral infection. Based on this and other data, we propose a model for IFITM3-mediated restriction.
    Journal of Virology 05/2013; · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic showed the speed with which a novel respiratory virus can spread and the ability of a generally mild infection to induce severe morbidity and mortality in a subset of the population. Recent in vitro studies show that the interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) protein family members potently restrict the replication of multiple pathogenic viruses. Both the magnitude and breadth of the IFITM proteins' in vitro effects suggest that they are critical for intrinsic resistance to such viruses, including influenza viruses. Using a knockout mouse model, we now test this hypothesis directly and find that IFITM3 is essential for defending the host against influenza A virus in vivo. Mice lacking Ifitm3 display fulminant viral pneumonia when challenged with a normally low-pathogenicity influenza virus, mirroring the destruction inflicted by the highly pathogenic 1918 'Spanish' influenza. Similar increased viral replication is seen in vitro, with protection rescued by the re-introduction of Ifitm3. To test the role of IFITM3 in human influenza virus infection, we assessed the IFITM3 alleles of individuals hospitalized with seasonal or pandemic influenza H1N1/09 viruses. We find that a statistically significant number of hospitalized subjects show enrichment for a minor IFITM3 allele (SNP rs12252-C) that alters a splice acceptor site, and functional assays show the minor CC genotype IFITM3 has reduced influenza virus restriction in vitro. Together these data reveal that the action of a single intrinsic immune effector, IFITM3, profoundly alters the course of influenza virus infection in mouse and humans.
    Nature 03/2012; 484(7395):519-23. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To replicate, viruses must gain access to the host cell's resources. Interferon (IFN) regulates the actions of a large complement of interferon effector genes (IEGs) that prevent viral replication. The interferon inducible transmembrane protein family members, IFITM1, 2 and 3, are IEGs required for inhibition of influenza A virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus replication in vitro. Here we report that IFN prevents emergence of viral genomes from the endosomal pathway, and that IFITM3 is both necessary and sufficient for this function. Notably, viral pseudoparticles were inhibited from transferring their contents into the host cell cytosol by IFN, and IFITM3 was required and sufficient for this action. We further demonstrate that IFN expands Rab7 and LAMP1-containing structures, and that IFITM3 overexpression is sufficient for this phenotype. Moreover, IFITM3 partially resides in late endosomal and lysosomal structures, placing it in the path of invading viruses. Collectively our data are consistent with the prediction that viruses that fuse in the late endosomes or lysosomes are vulnerable to IFITM3's actions, while viruses that enter at the cell surface or in the early endosomes may avoid inhibition. Multiple viruses enter host cells through the late endocytic pathway, and many of these invaders are attenuated by IFN. Therefore these findings are likely to have significance for the intrinsic immune system's neutralization of a diverse array of threats.
    PLoS Pathogens 10/2011; 7(10):e1002337. · 8.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Influenza viruses exploit host cell machinery to replicate, resulting in epidemics of respiratory illness. In turn, the host expresses antiviral restriction factors to defend against infection. To find host cell modifiers of influenza A H1N1 viral infection, we used a functional genomic screen and identified over 120 influenza A virus-dependency factors with roles in endosomal acidification, vesicular trafficking, mitochondrial metabolism, and RNA splicing. We discovered that the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins IFITM1, 2, and 3 restrict an early step in influenza A viral replication. The IFITM proteins confer basal resistance to influenza A virus but are also inducible by interferons type I and II and are critical for interferon's virustatic actions. Further characterization revealed that the IFITM proteins inhibit the early replication of flaviviruses, including dengue virus and West Nile virus. Collectively this work identifies a family of antiviral restriction factors that mediate cellular innate immunity to at least three major human pathogens.
    Cell 12/2009; 139(7):1243-54. · 31.96 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

489 Citations
87.67 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • University of Massachusetts Medical School
      • Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems
      Worcester, MA, United States
  • 2012
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States