Rudolf R. Sinkovics

Lappeenranta University of Technology, Villmanstrand, South Karelia, Finland

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Publications (106)53.81 Total impact

  • Source
    Heinz Tüselmann, Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Grigory Pishchulov
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    ABSTRACT: The question of how to assess research outputs published in journals is now a global concern for academics. Numerous journal ratings and rankings exist, some featuring perceptual and peer-review-based journal ranks, some focusing on objective information related to citations, some using a combination of the two. This research consolidates existing journal rankings into an up-to-date and comprehensive list. Existing approaches to determining journal rankings are significantly advanced with the application of a new classification approach, ‘random forests’, and data envelopment analysis. As a result, a fresh look at a publication’s place in the global research community is offered. While our approach is applicable to all management and business journals, we specifically exemplify the relative position of ‘operations research, management science, production and operations management’ journals within the broader management field, as well as within their own subject domain.
    Omega 03/2015; 51:11-23. DOI:10.1016/j.omega.2014.08.002 · 3.19 Impact Factor
  • Zaheer Khan, Yong Kyu Lew, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate how international joint ventures (IJVs) established in emerging economies help their local suppliers with technological knowledge transfer. Data from 50 Pakistani-owned Tier 1 suppliers, three of the major assemblers, and policy makers in the Ministry of Industries and Production in Pakistan is collected. Findings suggest that, in the context of the Pakistani emerging economy, IJVs can also play a critical role as the boundary spanners of knowledge transfer. Local suppliers are linked with their global suppliers' networks through associational learning. Social capital between the IJVs and the local component suppliers and the IJVs' willingness to initiate a knowledge transfer dialogue among local and global Tier 1 suppliers are critically important factors that enable this transfer.
    02/2015; 5(1). DOI:10.1002/gsj.1089
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    ABSTRACT: Cultural diversity can impede the standardization of marketing programs and increase the complexity of marketing research efforts (see Assael, 1992; Cateora, 1996; Douglas and Craig, 1992). In the context of marketing research, the cross-cultural comparability of research results is a particularly thorny topic which is frequently ignored by researchers. Yet, neglecting cross-cultural comparability issues may render marketing research input for international marketing decisions meaningless (Manrai and Manrai, 1996).
    Proceedings of the 1997 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) Annual Conference, 01/2015: pages 74-78;
  • Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean, Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Daekwan Kim
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    ABSTRACT: The literature suggests that advances in information and communication technologies have been a major driver of the restructuring of multinational enterprises and their cross-border supply chain management. However, the role of information technology usage for collaboration and its antecedents and performance implications in cross-border exchange relationships have not been clearly specified. In response to this claim, this study examines the determinants of electronic collaboration (E-collaboration) and its outcomes for suppliers with regard to their international customers. Drawing on an empirical foundation of 240 Taiwanese-based electronics equipment manufacturers, we test the effects of technological, organizational and environmental dimensions on E-collaboration and its impact on relationship performance in international exchange. The findings on the pertinence of E-collaboration in international customer–supplier relationships are presented and discussed.
    Information & Management 11/2014; 51(7-7):854-864. DOI:10.1016/j.im.2014.08.002 · 1.79 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Mo Yamin, Khalid Nadvi, Yingying Zhang Zhang
    International Business Review 08/2014; 23(4). DOI:10.1016/j.ibusrev.2014.04.001 · 1.51 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Noemi Sinkovics, Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Mo Yamin
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an exploratory study of how social value creation and business models may be interrelated in the context of the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) business formation. We develop our analysis around five case studies of actual businesses set up in rural India by people in the BOP. We attempt to draw implications from the performance of the business models in the BOP for what MNE strategies of engagement with the BOP may learn from the processes we analysed.
    International Business Review 08/2014; 23(4). DOI:10.1016/j.ibusrev.2013.12.004 · 1.51 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Grigory Pishchulov, Heinz Tüselmann, Rudolf R Sinkovics
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The question of how to assess research outputs published in journals is now a global concern for academics. Numerous journal ratings and rankings exist, some featuring perceptual and peer-review-based journal ranks, some focusing on objective information related to citations, some using a combination of the two. This research consolidates existing journal rankings into an up-to-date and comprehensive list. Existing approaches to determining journal rankings are significantly advanced with the application of a new classification approach, ‘random forests’, and data envelopment analysis. As a result, a fresh look at a publication’s place in the global research community is offered. While our approach is applicable to all management and business journals, we specifically exemplify the relative position of ‘operations research, management science, production and operations management’ journals within the broader management field, as well as within their own subject domain.
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    ABSTRACT: Does affiliation with a business group enhance a firm's performance? What is the potential effect of this affiliation especially in declining economic periods? The literature provides contradictory results on this proposition. In this study, the authors explore the role of business group affiliation as a firm-specific factor and its impact in different environments, adding to our understanding of the firm-growth phenomenon. The empirical context is a large sample of firms registered in the United Kingdom, drawn from the FAME database. The analysis provides evidence for significant impact of business group affiliations on firm growth, especially during adverse economic conditions. However, the business group–firm growth relationship is moderated by firm-specific characteristics (e.g. firm size), and group specific characteristics (e.g. type of ownership and country of origin). Regarding the latter, it is specifically revealed that the impact of group affiliation is not uniform across all countries, a possibility that has been ignored in the international business literature. Among its contributions, this research introduces a novel typology of firms in growing and declining industries. The proposed typology enables us to advance propositions with respect to varying trajectories of business affiliations for firms of different size and nationality/region of origin of business groups.
    International Business Review 02/2014; 23(1):195–211. DOI:10.1016/j.ibusrev.2013.04.003 · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Globalization drives firms to develop product innovation through their global supply chains. While innovations generated by supply channel members, as opposed to individual partners, are playing an increasingly important role in the success of all supply chain partners, there has been limited research on how supply chain relationships cultivate the process of such innovation generation, particularly in emerging markets. Correspondingly, this study explores how multinational suppliers can develop adaptive product innovation to create competitive advantage in emerging markets. Drawing on the knowledge-based view and transaction cost economics, this study investigates the influence of supplier involvement and other factors on supplier innovation and performance. The results of a survey of 170 multinational automobile suppliers in China provide support for most of the hypotheses. Specifically, supplier involvement in codesign has an inverted U-shaped relationship with product innovation. Furthermore, knowledge protection, trust, and technological uncertainty are all found to drive greater product innovation. In addition, the institutional environment moderates the effect of product innovation on performance. Overall, this study enhances our understanding of how MNEs can acquire local knowledge and develop adaptive products in emerging markets.
    Journal of Product Innovation Management 01/2014; 31(1-1):98-113. DOI:10.1111/jpim.12082 · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • 01/2014: pages 841-862; Springer Berlin Heidelberg., ISBN: 3642397468
  • Mo Yamin, Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Christopher Richardson
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines two aspects of the internationalisation of innovation in Finnish multinational companies, the growing innovativeness of foreign subsidiaries ('creative subsidiaries') and the phenomenon of 'cross-fertilisation', between R&D labs in Finland and those in foreign subsidiaries, in the innovative process of Finnish MNEs. We review existing literature pertaining to innovation in multinational enterprises and the growing capability of foreign subsidiaries to undertake innovation. Consistent with the general thrust of the literature we develop and examine two hypotheses relating to subsidiary innovation and cross-fertilisation between subsidiaries and the parent for 30 Finnish MNEs between the years 1975-1995, employing patent data from the US patent office. Our findings provide support for the hypotheses. We conclude by pointing out the limitations of the current study and deriving implications from our findings for future research.
    European J of International Management 01/2014; 8(3):310 - 330. DOI:10.1504/EJIM.2014.060771 · 0.47 Impact Factor
  • Yong Kyu Lew, Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Olli Kuivalainen
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    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates to what extent resource governance of international ventures affects dynamic capability and market performance in the high-tech firms’ internationalization process. We examine the non-equity-based international network collaborations of high-tech firms as forms of strategic resource seeking within the internationalization process. Within the context of upstream technology collaborations by international software and hardware firms, this paper proposes and empirically examines the impact of resource governance mechanisms (i.e. trust-building and behavioral monitoring) on the exploratory capabilities of firms. The findings indicate that building trust in the internationalization process of network ventures contributes to the firm-level exploratory capabilities and, in turn, market performance. Furthermore, this paper tests the moderating effects of structural capital on the capability–performance relationship. The relationship is stronger when network relationships existed before the inception of the international technology alliance. We also find a negative moderating effect from the existence of an actual alliance and from network duration on the relationship between exploratory capability and market performance. To this end, the longevity of the alliance may not always be something firms should aim for. The paper highlights the criticality of relational and structural capital in the internationalization process and the importance of exploratory capability for creating radical innovation in high-tech industries.
    International Business Review 12/2013; 22(6):1101–1120. DOI:10.1016/j.ibusrev.2013.03.001 · 1.51 Impact Factor
  • Elfriede Penz, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: Social systems play a pivotal role in shaping customers' views, the adoption process and subsequent product diffusion for novel products. Perceptions of Austrian consumers regarding payment systems were assessed in a cross-sectional analysis applying social representations theory. Social representations help to unravel the sources of individuals' attitudinal or perceptual similarities and differences, which often stem from inter-group differences. In short, they are useful for the investigation of ‘deeper structure’ aspects of consumer behaviour, as has been shown in previous studies. This may be seen as a further step forward for marketing research, which operates largely on social phenomena. This study addresses the shortage of non-cognitive-based research in marketing by offering a methodological approach that uses triangulation on the basis of associative answers from social groups. A four-step analytic design revealed that consumer groups transpose the abstract concept of payment systems into tangible objects and processes in a similar way; however, their social background impacted which value was attached to established as well as new means of payment. Cash is still seen as the prototypical form of payment; newer forms, such as credit cards or ATM cards, appear already in the periphery of representations, urgently needing well-concerted marketing efforts to become recognized as substitutes for cash. From a managerial view, the research employs social phenomena as a basis for segmenting natural rather than nominal groups in order to better serve consumers' needs in an increasingly connected social reality. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of Consumer Behaviour 07/2013; 12(4). DOI:10.1002/cb.1420 · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • Yong Kyu Lew, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates governance mechanisms in international technology alliances (ITAs), firm-level innovation capabilities, and performance outcomes in the mobile computing market. This high-tech market is characterized by numerous cross-border strategic technology collaborations between software and hardware firms. Anchoring our work in interfirm governance theories and the resource-based view, we develop a model and empirically test relationships related to behavioral governance mechanisms, innovation capabilities, and business performance. In the cross-industry and cross-border context, the empirical model explains to what extent complementary strategic resources, through a relational governance mechanism, contribute to the innovation capabilities of high-tech firms, providing competitive advantage. The data, analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) path modeling, indicates that technological commitment is a factor in expediting technology resource exchange in ITAs between heterogeneous firms. Technological commitment is captured by the extent to which a focal firm commits to investing its technology resources in an ITA to maintain the relationship. The results also show that firm-level performance is only influenced by market development capability, and not new product development capability, in product innovation. However, we did not find any significant moderating effects of firm size and industry type on the model. This paper offers insights into how high-tech firms benefit from interfirm governance in international technology resource exchange arrangements. Furthermore, it provides evidence of the methodological usefulness of PLS path modeling in strategic alliance, capability and performance research.
    Long Range Planning 02/2013; 46(s 1–2):13–38. DOI:10.1016/j.lrp.2012.09.006 · 2.11 Impact Factor
  • Noemi Sinkovics, Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Ruey-Jer Bryan Jean
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ While the internet enjoys increasing interest regarding its potential to extend the global reach of firms, especially small and medium-sized firms (SMEs), little work has been done on the viability of the internet as a new and effective path to internationalization. Specifically, it is unclear how the internet can successfully support export marketing. The purpose of this paper is to examine the drivers and performance outcomes of two patterns of internet use supporting export marketing: the internet as an alternative to a physical presence and the internet as a sales channel. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Data were collected from 115UK-based SMEs involved in "active online internationalization". Relationships are examined in a "soft-modeling" partial least squares (PLS) analysis. Findings ‐ The findings suggest that online channel support positively enhances export performance for SMEs. Yet, the use of the internet as an alternative to a physical market presence does not lead to higher export performance. Specifically, born-global firms that are relying too much on the internet are prone to fall into the "virtuality trap". Entrepreneurial firms that use the internet as a sales channel can improve their overall performance, however. Research limitations/implications ‐ This paper provides some empirical evidence of the existence of the notion of the "virtuality trap". The paper also shows that the internet can serve a valuable complementary role. Traditional exporters are likely to use the internet as a complement to, and thus to support, existing physical operations. Practical implications ‐ Managers should focus on relationship building and on-site learning, instead of putting too much emphasis on the internet as a substitute for a physical market presence. Originality/value ‐ The authors develop a framework and explore previously untested relationships that suggest the internet may play a complementary role in firm internationalization.
    International Marketing Review 01/2013; 30(2). DOI:10.1108/02651331311314556 · 1.18 Impact Factor
  • Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean, Daekwan Kim, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: While innovations generated by supply channel relationships, as opposed to individual partners, play an increasingly important role in the success of all supply chain partners, there has been a dearth of research in the literature on how supply chain relationships cultivate the process of such innovation generation. We explore supplier market knowledge acquisition, relationship learning, systems collaboration, and technological uncertainty as antecedents of supplier innovation generation, which is in turn hypothesized to positively affect the relationship performance of the supplier. Furthermore, supplier dependence on the buyer is investigated as a moderator of the effects of such antecedents on supplier innovation generation. Empirical tests, which used a sample of 236 Taiwanese executives, supported most of the hypotheses, and some implications of the results are discussed.
    Decision Sciences 12/2012; 43(6-6):1003-1038. DOI:10.1111/j.1540-5915.2012.00380.x · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Eva A. Alfoldi
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    ABSTRACT: The business and management community increasingly recognises that qualitative research is a 'messy', non-linear and often unpredictable undertaking. Yet, a considerable proportion of the qualitative research published in top journals is still presented as the result of a linear, predictable research process, thus wrongly suggesting deductive reasoning. In this paper, we focus on a particular type of 'messiness' where during fieldwork, the research context is revealed to be more complex than anticipated, forcing the researcher to gradually refine/shift their focus to reflect 'what really matters'. We adopt Stake's notion of progressive focusing for this gradual approach. Progressive focusing is well-suited to qualitative research in international business requiring complex iteration between theory and data, and the truthful yet coherent presentation of the research process. We propose that this dual challenge of complexity and trustworthiness may be addressed by using computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS). We present conceptual considerations and guidelines and offer a view on a 'messy', non-linear doctoral research project conducted using a progressive focusing approach, to demonstrate how CAQDAS can help to develop and re-negotiate insights from theory and interview data, as well as enhance trustworthiness, transparency and publication potential.
    Management International Review 12/2012; 52(6):817-845. DOI:10.2307/41682288 · 0.75 Impact Factor
  • Christopher Richardson, Mo Yamin, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates the impact of social and business interactions on firm internationalisation within the context of an industrial cluster created from scratch by policymakers. Based on in-depth interviews with firms in Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor cluster, our findings suggest that a permanent cluster of this nature may not be able to stimulate the development of frequent, spontaneous, informal interaction and rich social networks often seen in ‘organic’ clusters, thus limiting the cluster's effect on firm internationalisation. However, the paper also shows that ‘temporary clusters’, such as trade shows and conferences, organised by policymakers on a regular basis within the broader context of the permanent cluster, can help firms to quickly acquire relevant knowledge.
    International Business Review 10/2012; 21(5-5):794-805. DOI:10.1016/j.ibusrev.2011.09.002 · 1.51 Impact Factor
  • Zhaleh Najafi-Tavani, Axèle Giroud, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: Building on network theory, this study investigates knowledge development in subsidiaries in the knowledge-intensive business service (KIBS) sector. Foreign subsidiaries’ internal and external networks are divided into three main categories: relations with (1) the local environment (external embeddedness), (2) parent firms (subsidiary–parent firm embeddedness and autonomy), and (3) sister subsidiaries (subsidiary–subsidiary embeddedness). Hypotheses are tested using a sample of 184 subsidiaries, located in the UK, whose parent firms are based outside the UK. While our results indicate that external embeddedness, subsidiary–parent embeddedness, and autonomy are main determinants of knowledge development within KIBS multinational companies, they show no association between subsidiary–subsidiary embeddedness and knowledge development.
    Service Industries Journal 08/2012; DOI:10.1080/02642069.2012.665895 · 2.58 Impact Factor
  • Zhaleh Najafi-Tavani, Axèle Giroud, Rudolf R. Sinkovics
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    ABSTRACT: • Building upon knowledge-based and network views, this paper seeks to examine how subsidiary characteristics (subsidiary willingness and subsidiary external embeddedness) and relationship characteristics (internal embeddedness, socialization mechanisms and shared values) impact the extent of Reverse Knowledge Transfer (RKT). • A survey was carried out to build a database of 178 subsidiaries operating in Knowledge Intensive Business Service (KIBS) sectors in the United Kingdom. • Our analysis indicates that willingness and socialization mechanisms are the most significant determinants of the extent of RKT. Further, the impacts of shared values and internal embeddedness are mediated by subsidiary willingness. The results also highlight the significant association between socialization mechanisms and internal embeddedness. Contrary to our expectation, external embeddedness has a negative influence on the extent of RKT.

Publication Stats

2k Citations
53.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014–2015
    • Lappeenranta University of Technology
      Villmanstrand, South Karelia, Finland
    • Technische Universität Dortmund
      • Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences
      Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2003–2015
    • The University of Manchester
      • Manchester Business School (MBS)
      Manchester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • Florida State University
      • College of Business
      Tallahassee, Florida, United States
  • 1999–2007
    • SH-Gen Wiesbaden
      Wiesbaden, Hesse, Germany
  • 2006
    • IMSA Amsterdam
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005
    • Universität Heidelberg
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1999–2003
    • Hochschule Mannheim
      Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1998–2000
    • Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien
      • Institute of International Marketing Management
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 1997
    • Klinikum Stuttgart
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany